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Portraits of Corruption: “A Time of Malfeasance,” Through October 14 at the Figge PDF Print E-mail
Reviews
Written by Michelle Garrison   
Thursday, 22 September 2011 09:16

'A Time of Malfeasance #11' and '#12'

What kind of person habitually lies, cheats, and steals? In the exhibit A Time of Malfeasance at the Figge Art Museum, printmaker Virginia Myers visualizes corruption through the psychological landscapes in which its perpetrators reside.

Malfeasance refers to a public official abusing his or her post, either through illicit or harmful endeavors. The early 1970s, when these works were created, was a period of political turmoil – Vietnam, Watergate, oil embargoes, and economic recession. Although this historical context was a likely influence on Myers, the artist doesn’t reference these events specifically; instead, she abstracts the mindset of the participants.

Myers has been a professor in the University of Iowa Fine Arts Department since 1962 and has been working in printmaking for more than 50 years. The Malfeasance prints were made using dry-point etching, a process in which the artist scratches the image into a copper plate, inks the surface, and prints it with a press onto paper.

The show includes 21 individual prints, with six framed in pairs. The largest of the group measures roughly three by two-and-a-half feet, with the smaller works sized approximately 10 by 12 inches. Completed in 1974, this series was gifted to the Figge by collector Herbert Tyler. These works, located on the second floor, will be on display through October 14.

 
Personal Art Therapy: Works by Breast-Cancer Survivors Are Showcased in "Living Proof," September 30 through October 29 at Bucktown Center for the Arts PDF Print E-mail
Feature Stories
Written by Mike Schulz   
Wednesday, 14 September 2011 07:00

Pamela Crouch

“It was awful,” says area artist and performer Pamela Crouch. “The year and a half I went through the whole cancer thing was just awful. The worst thing ever. But I have an amazing husband, I have an amazing family, and I have the love and support of all these people who are available.

“And when they’re not available? I have a paintbrush.”

That, in a nutshell, is the concept behind Living Proof, the group exhibit – on display throughout the Bucktown Center for the Arts from September 30 through October 29 – that will showcase artistic works, in numerous media, by more than a dozen breast-cancer survivors residing between Chicago and Camanche, Iowa. Originally conceived by Crouch and Chicago-area artist Mary Ellen Cunningham, Living Proof will be enjoying its second Bucktown exhibition in as many years, and will feature roughly five-dozen never-before-displayed works created by both professional and amateur artists.

“A lot of times,” says Moline resident Crouch of living with cancer, “you’re so tired. You’re so exhausted. You’re overwhelmed and you feel very isolated. And that’s what Living Proof is about: getting those feelings out in some kind of creative way.”

 
Art in Plain Sight: Two Davenport Cathedral Spires PDF Print E-mail
Feature Stories
Written by Bruce Walters   
Thursday, 08 September 2011 07:26

Sacred Heart Cathedral. Photo by Bruce Walters.When Sacred Heart Cathedral (at the corner of Iowa and 10th streets in Davenport) was completed in 1891, its bell tower and spire was the tallest structure in the Quad Cities. Soaring majestically above the surrounding trees and neighborhood, its approximate height of 160 feet seemed even greater because of its placement at the top of a steep hill near the crest of the bluff overlooking the Mississippi.

Several blocks to the west, Trinity Episcopal Cathedral (at 121 West 12th Street) had been constructed 18 years before. Although a spire was part of architect’s original plans, it was not built because of a lack of funds.

But in 1998, Elizabeth Haines (a member of the Trinity congregation) personally financed the building of a bell tower and spire. In memory of her grandparents – who were charter members of the cathedral – the 131-foot tower was built to its original specifications.

 
“Our Van Gogh, Cézanne, and Corot”: A Memorial Tribute to Jim Konrad, Through September 17 at the Augustana College Art Museum PDF Print E-mail
Feature Stories
Written by Jeff Ignatius   
Friday, 26 August 2011 08:35

'Family Portrait' (1976)

There is no doubt that Jim Konrad was a brilliant technician.

“He knew more about the nature of artist materials than any other artist in the Quad Cities,” said Sherry Maurer, director of the Augustana College Art Museum.

“He was very serious about technique,” said his wife Cathy. “And they [his artworks] all have superb technique – color form, composition, things like that.” She called him an “artist’s artist.”

Peter Xiao, a teaching colleague of Konrad’s at Augustana for more than two decades, said the artist’s work is “perfectly balanced” in terms of color – the dark and light, the chromatic scheme.

The Figge Art Museum, in its description of two Konrad works in its collection, notes his “meticulous craftsmanship and expertise in painting methods and materials.”

And in an interview with Bruce Carter earlier this year for the WVIK program Art Talks, Konrad (whom I never met) called himself a teacher of fundamentals. “The more you understand about how to use your materials and how to do it, the more it frees you to be an artist,” he said.

'Landscape (Grey Barn)' (1990)

Konrad’s technical acumen is plainly evident in the Augustana College Art Museum’s current memorial exhibit, celebrating the artist and faculty member who died in May at age 67.

For just one admittedly minor illustration, look at how he painted masking tape in a number of pieces. As Maurer said, “Sometimes ... we’ve had big debates as to whether it’s real tape or not.”

But praising somebody’s proficiency – even one as fine-tuned as Konrad’s – can be a backhanded compliment. And the body of work on display at Augustana College shows an artist fluent in many forms of expression who explored the world in rich and sometimes discomforting ways.

 
Art in Plain Sight: Deere & Company Headquarters PDF Print E-mail
Feature Stories
Written by Bruce Walters   
Wednesday, 17 August 2011 05:58

Photo by Bruce Walters.

Hill Arches is a bronze sculpture created in 1974 by one of the most prominent sculptors of the 20th Century, Henry Moore (1898-1986). Moore’s monumental works are often based on human forms, but as its title suggests, this piece is meant to be seen in a relationship with its environment.

It is located on a small island in the reflecting pond directly in front of the Deere & Company world-headquarters building in Moline, off John Deere Road a little more than three miles east of Interstate 74.

Viewed from the island, the sculpture is massive. Weighing more than 8,800 pounds, it is 18 feet in length and 12 feet high. But when viewed from a distance, its open spaces give it an unfolding, rising quality. Though large, it appears to float just above the lawn, its base hidden by the grass. This is a fitting paradox for a sculpture that works both with the modern architectural style of the world headquarters and with its surrounding landscape.

 
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