Suscribe to Weekly RiverCitiesReader.com Updates
* indicates required

View previous campaigns.

  • Buy Pixelmator MAC (en)
  • Discount - Autodesk AutoCAD Inventor Professional Suite 2010 (32 bit)
  • Buy OEM Autodesk AutoCAD Civil 3D Land Desktop Companion 2009
  • Download Lynda.com - Practical Photoshop Selections
  • Discount - Vmware Workstation 10
  • Buy OEM Apple Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard Server
  • Buy OEM MacPhun Intensify
  • Buy Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 MAC (en,es,de,fr,it,ja)
  • Download Siemens Solid Edge ST6 (32-bit)
  • Download Autodesk AutoCAD Plant 3D 2014 (32-bit)
  • Download Acala DVD to Pocket PC
  • Don’t Regulate Marijuana like Alcohol – Keep Government Out! PDF Print E-mail
    Commentary/Politics - Guest Commentaries
    Written by James C. Wilson   
    Tuesday, 24 February 2015 06:48

    On February 20, U.S. Representatives Jared Polis (D-Colorado) and Earl Blumenauer (D-Oregon) introduced two new bills for federal marijuana legalization. The U.S. government’s practice of imprisoning, fining, harassing, and stigmatizing marijuana users is tragic and has damaged many lives. Ending prohibition is a welcome change, but these bills have severe problems. If passed, they would turn marijuana into a cartelized industry rather than a business opportunity for everyday people.

    Blumenaur’s bill, The Marijuana Tax Revenue Act of 2015 (HR 1014), would place a federal excise tax on marijuana, and occupational taxes on the marijuana-related businesses. Polis’ HR 1013, The Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol Act, would end federal prohibition of marijuana and transfer enforcement from the Drug Enforcement Agency to the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, & Explosives. The bills would subject marijuana to the same sort of taxation and regulation as alcohol and tobacco, using Colorado as a nationwide model. Such a regime would lead to the development of “big marijuana” firms similar to “big alcohol” and “big tobacco.”

     
    The Best Defense (for the Welfare State) Is an Expensive Offense PDF Print E-mail
    Commentary/Politics - Guest Commentaries
    Written by Thomas L. Knapp   
    Friday, 06 February 2015 05:54

    In late January, the U.S. military-industrial complex reported results for 2014’s fourth quarter and expectations for 2015. Good times! Northrop Grumman knocked down nearly $6 billion in Q4 2014 and expects 2015 sales of around $23.5 billion. Raytheon did about as well last fall and expects a big radar order from the Air Force this year. Meanwhile, the Pentagon announced a travel upgrade for the president of the United States – a new Air Force One. Base cost for the Boeing 747-8? $368 million, before presidential modifications.

    Anyone who doesn’t live under a rock (or whose rock gets bombed periodically) knows that the U.S. government spends more on its military than any other nation-state. A useful way of understanding how much more: If the U.S. “defense” budget were cut by 90 percent, it would remain the first- or second-largest military spender in the world (depending on fluctuations in China’s military expenditures).

    That 90 percent – and then some – is the single-largest welfare entitlement program in the U.S. government’s budget, even omitting “emergency supplementals” for the military misadventure of the week and military spending snuck into other budget lines.

     
    The Political Class’ War on Immigrants Is a Diversion PDF Print E-mail
    Commentary/Politics - Guest Commentaries
    Written by Chad Nelson   
    Wednesday, 04 February 2015 05:48

    As Loretta Lynch’s U.S. Senate confirmation hearings for the office of Attorney General opened on January 28, Republicans were dying to ask her just how friendly she might be to the class of people government defines as “illegal aliens.” In an exchange with immigration scrooge Jeff Sessions (R-Alabama), Sessions wondered who Lynch believes has the right to work in America. Specifically, he asked: Who has “more right” – a lawful immigrant, a citizen, or a person who entered the country unlawfully? Lynch wisely opted to dodge Sessions’ silly multiple-choice question, instead responding that if a person is here unlawfully, she’d prefer it be as a participant in America’s workforce.

    Sessions’ line of questioning – and the answer he was fishing for – reveal much about the political class’ warped thinking. The bipartisan immigration-bashing contingent in Washington believes, as Sheldon Richman notes, “permission to work is theirs to bestow.” Unfortunately, that belief is the law of the land. Today, who may work is a question decided largely by Washington bureaucrats and special interests jockeying to buy legal monopolies on their services. While you may think yourself free to pursue work of your choosing, the countless prerequisites and riders imposed by government drastically narrow your choices. If you’re fortunate enough to overcome those obstacles, your ability to remain effective at your craft is often curtailed as you’re forced to wade through a morass of government-mandated compliance.

     
    The American Police State in 2014 PDF Print E-mail
    Commentary/Politics - Guest Commentaries
    Written by John W. Whitehead   
    Wednesday, 28 January 2015 10:34

    “You’re either a cop or little people.” – Police captain Harry Bryant in Blade Runner

    For those of us who managed to survive 2014 with our lives intact and our freedoms hanging by a thread, it was a year of crackdowns, clampdowns, shutdowns, showdowns, shootdowns, standdowns, knockdowns, putdowns, breakdowns, lockdowns, takedowns, slowdowns, meltdowns, and never-ending letdowns.

    We’ve had our freedoms turned inside out, our democratic structure flipped upside down, and our house of cards left in shambles.

     
    From Neighborhood Cops to Robocops PDF Print E-mail
    Commentary/Politics - Guest Commentaries
    Written by John W. Whitehead   
    Thursday, 22 January 2015 05:08

    “Technological progress has merely provided us with more efficient means for going backwards.” – Aldous Huxley, Ends & Means

    If 2014 was the year of militarized police, armored tanks, and stop-and-frisk searches, 2015 may well be the year of technologized police, surveillance blimps, and scan-and-frisk searches.

    Just as we witnessed neighborhood cops being transformed into soldier cops, we’re about to see them shapeshift once again, this time into robocops, complete with robotic exoskeletons, super-vision contact lenses, computer-linked visors, and mind-reading helmets.

    Similarly, just as military equipment created for the battlefield has been deployed on American soil against American citizens, we’re about to see military technology employed here at home in a manner sure to annihilate what’s left of our privacy and Fourth Amendment rights.

    For instance, with the flick of a switch (and often without your even being aware of the interference), police can now shut down your cell phone, scan your body for “suspicious” items as you walk down the street, test the air in your car for alcohol vapors as you drive down the street, identify you at a glance and run a background check on you for outstanding warrants, piggyback on your surveillance devices to listen in on your conversations and “see” what you see on your private cameras, and track your car’s movements via a GPS-enabled dart.

    That doesn’t even begin to scrape the surface of what’s coming down the pike, with law enforcement and military agencies boasting technologies so advanced as to render everything up until now mere child’s play.

    Once these technologies, which used to belong exclusively to the realm of futuristic sci-fi films, have been unleashed on an unsuspecting American public, it will completely change the face of American policing and, in the process, transform the landscape of what we used to call our freedoms.

    It doesn’t even matter that these technologies can be put to beneficial uses. As we’ve learned the hard way, once the government gets involved, it’s only a matter of time before the harm outweighs the benefits.

    Imagine self-guided “smart” bullets that can track their target as it moves, solar-powered airships that provide persistent wide-area surveillance and tracking of ground “targets,” a grenade launcher that can deliver 14 flash-bang rounds, invisible tanks that can blend into their surroundings and masquerade as a snow bank or a soccer mom’s station wagon, and a guided mortar weapon that can target someone up to 12 miles away.

    Or what about “less lethal weapons” such as the speech-jammer gun, which can render a target tongue-tied; sticky foam guns, which shoot foam that hardens on contact, immobilizing the victim; and shock-wave generators, which use the shockwaves from a controlled explosion to knock people over.

    Now imagine trying to defend yourself against such devices, which are incapable of distinguishing between an enemy combatant and a civilian. For that matter, imagine attempting to defend yourself or your loved ones against police officers made superhuman thanks to technology that renders them bullet-proof, shatter-proof, all-seeing, all-knowing, and all-powerful.

    Does rendering a government agent superhuman make them inhuman, as well – unable to relate to the mass of humanity they are sworn to protect and defend?

    Pointing out that the clothes people wear can affect how they act, Salon.com reporter Geordie McRuer notes that “when clothing has symbolic meaning – such as a uniform that is worn only by a certain profession – it prepares the mind for the pursuit of goals that are consistent with the symbolic meaning of the clothing.”

    McRuer continues: “When we dress our police officers in camouflage before deploying them to a peaceful protest, the result will be police who think more like soldiers. This likely includes heightening their perception of physical threats, and increasing the likelihood that they react to those threats with violence. Simply put, dressing police up like soldiers potentially changes how they see a situation, changing protesters into enemy combatants, rather than what they are: civilians exercising their democratic rights. ...

    “When police wear soldiers’ clothing, and hold soldiers’ weapons, it primes them to think and act like soldiers. Furthermore, clothing that conceals their identity – such as the helmets, gas masks, goggles, body armor, and riot shields that are now standard-issue for officers at peaceful protests – will increase the likelihood that officers react aggressively to the situation. As a result of the fact that they are also dressed like soldiers, they are more likely to interpret the situation as hostile and will more readily identify violence as the best solution.”

    While robocops are troubling enough, the problem we’re facing is so much greater than technology-enhanced domestic soldiers.

    We’re on the cusp of a major paradigm shift from fascism disguised as a democracy into a technocratic surveillance society in which there are no citizens, only targets. We’re all targets now, to be scanned, surveilled, tracked, and treated like blips on a screen.

    What’s taking place in Maryland right now is a perfect example of this shift. With Congress’ approval and generous funding (and without the consensus of area residents), the Army has just launched two massive, billion-dollar surveillance airships into the skies over Baltimore, each three times the size of a Goodyear blimp, ostensibly to defend against cruise-missile attacks. Government officials claim the surveillance blimps, which provide highly detailed radar imaging within a 340-mile radius, are not presently being used to track individuals or carry out surveillance against citizens, but it’s only a matter of time before that becomes par for the course.

    In New York, police will soon start employing mobile scanners that allow them to scan people on the street to detect any hidden object under their clothes, be it a gun, a knife, or anything else that appears “suspicious.” The scanners will also let them carry out enhanced data collection in the field – fingerprints, iris scans, facial mapping – which will build the government’s biometric database that much faster. These scanners are a more-mobile version of the low-radiation X-ray vans used to scan the contents of passing cars.

    Google Glass, being considered for use by officers, would allow police to access computer databases, as well as run background checks on and record anyone in their line of sight.

    One program, funded by $160 million in asset-forfeiture funds, would equip police officers and vehicles with biometric smartphones that can scan individuals’ fingerprints and cross-check them against criminal databases. The devices will also contain real-time 911 data; warrant information from federal, state, and city databases; photographs of missing persons, suspects, Crime Stoppers posters, and other persons of interest; and the latest cache of information on terror suspects.

    Stand-off lasers can detect alcohol vapors in a moving car: “If alcohol vapors are detected in the car, a message with a photo of the car including its license plate is sent to a police officer waiting down the road. Then, the police officer stops the car and checks for signs of alcohol using conventional tests.”

    Ekin Patrol cameras, described as “the first truly intelligent patrol unit in the world,” can not only detect the speed of passing cars but can generate tickets instantaneously; recognize and store the license plates of stopped, moving, or parked vehicles; measure traffic density and violation data; and engage in facial recognition of drivers and passengers.

    Collectively, all of these gizmos, gadgets, and surveillance devices render us not just suspects in a surveillance state but also inmates in an electronic concentration camp. As journalist Lynn Stuart Parramore notes: “The Information Age ... has turned out rather differently than many expected. Instead of information made available for us, the key feature seems to be information collected about us. Rather of granting us anonymity and privacy with which to explore a world of facts and data, our own data is relentlessly and continually collected and monitored. The wondrous things that were supposed to make our lives easier – mobile devices, Gmail, Skype, GPS, and Facebook – have become tools to track us, for whatever purposes the trackers decide. We have been happily shopping for the bars to our own prisons, one product at a time.”

    Unfortunately, eager for progress and ill-suited to consider the moral and spiritual ramifications of our planned obsolescence, we have yet to truly fathom what it means to live in an environment in which we are always on red alert, always under observation, and always having our actions measured, judged, and found wanting under some law or other intrusive government regulation.

    There are those who are not at all worried about this impending future, certain that they have nothing to hide. Rest assured, soon we will all have nowhere to hide from the prying eyes of a government bound and determined to know everything about us – where we go, what we do, what we say, what we read, what we keep in our pockets, how much money we have on us, how we spend that money, who we know, what we eat and drink, and where we are at any given moment. The government is also prepared to use that information against us, whenever it becomes convenient and profitable to do so.

    Making the case that we’re being transformed as citizens, neighbors, and human beings, Parramore identifies six factors arising from a society in which surveillance becomes the norm: a shift in power dynamics, in which the “watcher” becomes all-seeing and all-powerful; an incentive to turn citizens into outlaws by criminalizing otherwise lawful activities; diminished citizenship; an environment of suspicion and paranoia; a divided society composed of the watchers and the watched; and “a society of edgy, unhappy beings whose sense of themselves is chronically diminished.”

    As Parramore rightly concludes, this is “not exactly a recipe for Utopia.”

    Constitutional attorney and author John W. Whitehead is founder and president of The Rutherford Institute (Rutherford.org). His award-winning book A Government of Wolves: The Emerging American Police State is available online at Amazon.com. He can be contacted at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

     
    << Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

    Page 1 of 88