Suscribe to Weekly RiverCitiesReader.com Updates
* indicates required

View previous campaigns.

“Shared Sacrifice”: Obama’s Demagoguery PDF Print E-mail
Commentary/Politics - Guest Commentaries
Written by Sheldon Richman   
Tuesday, 02 August 2011 07:28

The most offensive claim made during the debt-ceiling controversy is that there’s a moral equivalence between cutting government spending and raising taxes. President Obama asks for “shared sacrifice” to reduce the budget deficit. In his view, if the government spends more than it takes in – it currently borrows more than 40 cents of every dollar spent – the “balanced” approach is to “cut” spending and raise taxes.

There are quotation marks around “cut” for a good reason. No one – Republican House Speaker John Boehner included – wants to cut spending in the commonsense meaning of the term: namely, reducing government spending from today’s level ($3.8 trillion). No, in Washington-talk, to cut a budget is merely to reduce the rate of increase that would have occurred in the future if current law were left unchanged.

If the politicians were honest – and reporters committed to telling the public the truth – they would talk about smaller increases in spending, not “cuts,” but even that wouldn’t be entirely truthful, because in many cases the reduction in future increases itself is an illusion. It involves merely canceling the authority to spend money that no one expects to actually be spent.

 
The Plight of Marco Sauceda and the Loss of Our Freedoms PDF Print E-mail
Commentary/Politics - Guest Commentaries
Written by John W. Whitehead   
Thursday, 28 July 2011 08:20

A person should feel secure in their own home. No matter black, white, Hispanic, Asian – I don’t care who they are – they should feel secure in their own home. The police have no right to come in your house and push you around and beat you up and do the things they did on March, 15, 2009.” – Ryan Deaton, defense attorney for Marco Sauceda

Too often, we elevate the events of the American Revolution to near-mythic status and forget that the real revolutionaries were neither agitators nor hotheads, neither looking for trouble nor trying to start a fight. Rather, they were people just like you and me, simply trying to make it from one day to another, a task that was increasingly difficult as Britain’s rule became more and more oppressive.

Caught up in the drama of Red Coats marching, muskets exploding, and flags waving in the night, we lose sight of the enduring significance of the Revolution and what makes it relevant to our world today. Yet the American Revolution did not so much start with a bang as with a whimper – a literal cry for relief from people groaning under the weight of an oppressive government’s demands.

 
Transparency Measure Is Ripe for Abuse PDF Print E-mail
Commentary/Politics - Guest Commentaries
Written by Thomas A. Schatz   
Wednesday, 13 July 2011 08:31

The lowest qualified bid by the most competent contestant traditionally wins the government contract. Unfortunately, the “Change” gang now wants to fiddle with this decades-old, generally reliable formula.

President Obama hopes to throw another item onto the scale as bureaucrats weigh bids: political donations. A draft executive order would instruct federal officials to consider the political contributions of prospective government contractors. While this move is being portrayed as a matter of increased transparency, it will actually fuel unintended consequences and indirectly overturn an important Supreme Court decision on free speech.

 
Does The New “White House Rural Council” Equal the UN’s Agenda 21? PDF Print E-mail
Commentary/Politics - Guest Commentaries
Written by Mike Opelka   
Thursday, 30 June 2011 05:11

On June 9, President Barack Obama signed his 86th executive order, and almost nobody noticed.

Executive Order 13575 is designed to begin taking control of almost all aspects of the lives of 16 percent of the American people. Why didn’t we notice it? Weinergate. In the middle of the Anthony Weiner scandal, as the press and most of the American people were distracted, Obama created something called the White House Rural Council (WHRC).

Section One of 13575 states the following: “Sixteen percent of the American population lives in rural counties. Strong, sustainable rural communities are essential to winning the future and ensuring American competitiveness in the years ahead. These communities supply our food, fiber, and energy, safeguard our natural resources, and are essential in the development of science and innovation. Though rural communities face numerous challenges, they also present enormous economic potential. The Federal Government has an important role to play in order to expand access to the capital necessary for economic growth, promote innovation, improve access to health care and education, and expand outdoor recreational activities on public lands.”

Warning bells should have been sounding all across rural America when the phrase “sustainable rural communities” came up. As we know from researching the UN plan for “sustainable development” known as Agenda 21, these are code words for the true, fundamental transformation of America.

 
Thomas Jefferson, the American Mind, and the Cosmic System PDF Print E-mail
Commentary/Politics - Guest Commentaries
Written by John W. Whitehead   
Wednesday, 29 June 2011 05:26

On May 26, 1776, John Adams – who represented Massachusetts at the Second Continental Congress – wrote exultantly to his friend James Warren that “every post and every day rolls in upon us independence like a torrent.” Adams had reason for rejoicing, for this was what he and others had hoped and worked for almost since the Congress had convened in May of the previous year. It helped, to be sure, that George III had proclaimed the colonies in rebellion, and this encouraged the Americans to take him at his word. Later, George Washington proceeded to drive General Howe out of Boston. This demonstrated that Americans need not stand on the defensive, but could vindicate themselves in military strategy quite as well as in political.

However exciting to some, America was going through the difficult process of being born. In any event, the stage of history was being set. On June 7, 1776, Richard Henry Lee of Virginia introduced three resolutions calling for independence, foreign alliances, and confederation. Some wanted unity and voted to postpone the final vote for three weeks. This allowed time for debate and for the hesitant and fainthearted to come over or step out. In the meantime, Congress appointed a committee to prepare a “Declaration of Independence.” This committee consisted of Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Roger Sherman, Robert Livingston, and Thomas Jefferson.

Jefferson had come to the Continental Congress the previous year, bringing with him a reputation for literature, science, and a talent for composition. His writings, said John Adams, “were remarkable for their peculiar felicity of expression.” In part because of his rhetorical gifts, in part because he already had a reputation for working quickly, in part because it was thought that Virginia – as the oldest, the largest, and the most deeply committed of the states – should take the lead, the committee unanimously turned to Jefferson to prepare a draft declaration.

 
<< Start < Prev 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Next > End >>

Page 13 of 86