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Transparency Measure Is Ripe for Abuse PDF Print E-mail
Commentary/Politics - Guest Commentaries
Written by Thomas A. Schatz   
Wednesday, 13 July 2011 08:31

The lowest qualified bid by the most competent contestant traditionally wins the government contract. Unfortunately, the “Change” gang now wants to fiddle with this decades-old, generally reliable formula.

President Obama hopes to throw another item onto the scale as bureaucrats weigh bids: political donations. A draft executive order would instruct federal officials to consider the political contributions of prospective government contractors. While this move is being portrayed as a matter of increased transparency, it will actually fuel unintended consequences and indirectly overturn an important Supreme Court decision on free speech.

 
Does The New “White House Rural Council” Equal the UN’s Agenda 21? PDF Print E-mail
Commentary/Politics - Guest Commentaries
Written by Mike Opelka   
Thursday, 30 June 2011 05:11

On June 9, President Barack Obama signed his 86th executive order, and almost nobody noticed.

Executive Order 13575 is designed to begin taking control of almost all aspects of the lives of 16 percent of the American people. Why didn’t we notice it? Weinergate. In the middle of the Anthony Weiner scandal, as the press and most of the American people were distracted, Obama created something called the White House Rural Council (WHRC).

Section One of 13575 states the following: “Sixteen percent of the American population lives in rural counties. Strong, sustainable rural communities are essential to winning the future and ensuring American competitiveness in the years ahead. These communities supply our food, fiber, and energy, safeguard our natural resources, and are essential in the development of science and innovation. Though rural communities face numerous challenges, they also present enormous economic potential. The Federal Government has an important role to play in order to expand access to the capital necessary for economic growth, promote innovation, improve access to health care and education, and expand outdoor recreational activities on public lands.”

Warning bells should have been sounding all across rural America when the phrase “sustainable rural communities” came up. As we know from researching the UN plan for “sustainable development” known as Agenda 21, these are code words for the true, fundamental transformation of America.

 
Thomas Jefferson, the American Mind, and the Cosmic System PDF Print E-mail
Commentary/Politics - Guest Commentaries
Written by John W. Whitehead   
Wednesday, 29 June 2011 05:26

On May 26, 1776, John Adams – who represented Massachusetts at the Second Continental Congress – wrote exultantly to his friend James Warren that “every post and every day rolls in upon us independence like a torrent.” Adams had reason for rejoicing, for this was what he and others had hoped and worked for almost since the Congress had convened in May of the previous year. It helped, to be sure, that George III had proclaimed the colonies in rebellion, and this encouraged the Americans to take him at his word. Later, George Washington proceeded to drive General Howe out of Boston. This demonstrated that Americans need not stand on the defensive, but could vindicate themselves in military strategy quite as well as in political.

However exciting to some, America was going through the difficult process of being born. In any event, the stage of history was being set. On June 7, 1776, Richard Henry Lee of Virginia introduced three resolutions calling for independence, foreign alliances, and confederation. Some wanted unity and voted to postpone the final vote for three weeks. This allowed time for debate and for the hesitant and fainthearted to come over or step out. In the meantime, Congress appointed a committee to prepare a “Declaration of Independence.” This committee consisted of Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Roger Sherman, Robert Livingston, and Thomas Jefferson.

Jefferson had come to the Continental Congress the previous year, bringing with him a reputation for literature, science, and a talent for composition. His writings, said John Adams, “were remarkable for their peculiar felicity of expression.” In part because of his rhetorical gifts, in part because he already had a reputation for working quickly, in part because it was thought that Virginia – as the oldest, the largest, and the most deeply committed of the states – should take the lead, the committee unanimously turned to Jefferson to prepare a draft declaration.

 
Big Business Getting Something for Nothing PDF Print E-mail
Commentary/Politics - Guest Commentaries
Written by David S. D’Amato   
Thursday, 16 June 2011 05:37

In early June, as a prelude to an expansive study of the Fortune 500 due later this summer, Citizens for Tax Justice (CTJ) published an analysis of “the current corporate tax debate.” Anarchists oppose taxes on principle as an exalted form of theft, but the fact that the most profitable firms in the country aren’t paying up raises other important questions.

Arguing that the “tax code has ... become overburdened with loopholes, shelters, and special tax breaks,” CTJ’s study demonstrates that 12 of America’s largest companies currently pay, in effect, a tax rate of negative 1.5 percent. That means that some corporations – among them Boeing – are in fact making money through the tax system as it is currently operating.

 
Bankrupt Nations Try (and Fail) to Stop the Future PDF Print E-mail
Commentary/Politics - Guest Commentaries
Written by Simon Black   
Monday, 30 May 2011 05:34

Debt is slavery ... or at least indentured servitude of the worst kind. That looming mortgage, the high-interest credit-card debt, the short-term car loan – these are the forces that keep people from breaking free and taking action.

Ironically, debt begets more debt. According to FinAid, the average U.S. student-loan debt for a four-year-private-university graduate is nearly $36,000, and $24,000 for a public university. Throw in that first car loan and maybe a mortgage, and suddenly you’re staring at hundreds of thousands of dollars in demoralizing claims on your future income.

At this point, most people figure: Hey, I’m already in debt up to my nose; might as well get in up to my eyeballs and buy a new plasma screen on credit.

 
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