Schulz's MediaCom VOD Picks
Suscribe to Weekly RiverCitiesReader.com Updates
* indicates required

View previous campaigns.

Gripping "Traffic" Is One for the Ages: Also, "All the Pretty Horses" and "Miss Congeniality" PDF Print E-mail
Movies - Reviews
Written by Mike Schulz   
Tuesday, 09 January 2001 18:00

Catherine Zeta-Jones in TrafficTRAFFIC

Sitting in the audience for Steven Soderbergh’s drug drama Traffic, I heard a sound that had been sorely missing from 12-plus months of moviegoing: rapt, appreciative silence. It was the sort of silence that you only get when a director is in full control of his work, when the actors are working at peak form, and when the storyline is so gripping that you can’t wait to see where it will lead you next. Based on a British mini-series, Traffic is something increasingly rare in modern films: a large-scale epic with a human pulse, in which every character and nuance is sharply defined, and in which your alliances and points of view change with each passing scene. The accolades and awards already bestowed on the film aren’t simply a matter of it being the best of a bum year; it’s one of the best movies released in many years.

 
The Eyes Have It, and an Apology from Hollywood: "Cast Away" and "The Family Man" PDF Print E-mail
Movies - Reviews
Written by Mike Schulz   
Tuesday, 02 January 2001 18:00

Tom Hanks in Cast AwayCAST AWAY

In Cast Away, Robert Zemeckis’ most fully satisfying work in ages, Tom Hanks stars as Chuck Noland, a FedEx engineer for whom the world can’t move fast enough; he’s obsessed with time-saving, whether it be with associates in Moscow or friends at home. Before boarding a plane for a business conference, he even goes so far as to give his girlfriend (Helen Hunt) a wrapped engagement ring, instructing her to open it when he returns. (He saves lead-in time on its actual presentation.) But somewhere over the Pacific, the plane crashes (in one of cinema’s most terrifying airplane disasters), and Chuck is washed up on a deserted island with little hope of escape or rescue; suddenly, he has all the time in the world, and the film, which had previously been lightning quick, slows down to a crawl.

 
The Perils – and Pleasures – of Self-Involvement: "The Emperor's New Groove" and "What Women Want" PDF Print E-mail
Movies - Reviews
Written by Mike Schulz   
Tuesday, 19 December 2000 18:00

The Emperor's New GrooveTHE EMPEROR'S NEW GROOVE

Despite being saddled with a crummy title, Disney’s The Emperor’s New Groove turns out to be the studio’s most sheerly pleasurable animated feature in ages. It appears to have been made not only for those of us who were sick to death of the tired old Disney formula, but by people who were sick to death of the tired old Disney formula; it attacks the studio’s shopworn clichés with a vengeance that is both hilarious and utterly deserved.

 
No Rescue from These Flawed Films: "Proof of Life" and "Vertical Limit" PDF Print E-mail
Movies - Reviews
Written by Mike Schulz   
Wednesday, 13 December 2000 18:00

Meg Ryan and Russell Crowe in Proof of LifePROOF OF LIFE

Proof of Life, the kidnapping drama by director Taylor Hackford, stars David Morse as Peter Bowman, an American engineer living near the Andes who gets abducted by a group of Latin American revolutionaries convinced that Bowman’s dam-building project is an insidious political maneuver.

 
"Unbreakable" Fails to Build on Promise -- or Premise PDF Print E-mail
Movies - Reviews
Written by Mike Schulz   
Tuesday, 28 November 2000 18:00

Samuel L. Jackson in UnbreakableUNBREAKABLE

You gotta give M. Night Shymalan credit: The man gives great preview. Though it’s impossible to determine just how much of a hand he had in creating the theatrical trailer for his new thriller Unbreakable, by the time the words “from the writer/director of The Sixth Sense” hit the screen, they’re completely superfluous; a mere 30 seconds in, you know it couldn’t possibly be the work of anyone else.

 
<< Start < Prev 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 Next > End >>

Page 157 of 164