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Now Playing: Friday, July 31, through Thursday, August 6 PDF Print E-mail
Now Playing
Written by Mike Schulz   
Wednesday, 29 July 2015 10:00

VacationFor show schedule information, visit:

61 Drive-in Theatre, Delmar

Blue Grass Drive-in, Blue Grass

FilmScene, Iowa City

Putnam Museum, Davenport

Rave Cinemas Davenport 53rd 18 + IMAX, Davenport

Regal Moline Stadium 14, Moline

 

(Hyperlinked titles take you to Mike Schulz's full reviews; the IMDb hyperlinks take you to the films' Internet Movie Database pages.)

 
True Detective / Truly Defective: "Mr. Holmes," "Southpaw," "Paper Towns," and "Pixels" PDF Print E-mail
Reviews
Written by Mike Schulz   
Saturday, 25 July 2015 16:42

Ian McKellen and Milo Parker in Mr. HolmesFriday, July 24, 10:40 a.m.-ish: It’s been so long since my last quadruple-feature – a miraculous six months plus! – that I’m only mildly dreading today’s, and only then because I know it’s ending with Adam Sandler. It’s beginning, however, with Mr. Holmes, and while I can’t imagine the world needing yet another showcase for Arthur Conan Doyle’s literary sleuth, I’m psyched knowing this latest iteration will reunite director Bill Condon with his Gods & Monsters star Ian McKellen and Kinsey co-star Laura Linney. Most of the movie consists of McKellen’s 93-year-old Sherlock, in 1947, contending with failing memory and the haunting case that forced his retirement, while Linney’s Irish housekeeper Mrs. Munro cooks and tidies up. But while several mysteries arise and are duly resolved in the film, I am distracted throughout by two unresolved questions. (1) Who is this little kid Milo Parker who plays Sherock’s protégé (and Mrs. Munro’s son) Roger? And (2) How is this boy giving a performance that might be topping those of the excellent McKellen and Linney?

 
Monog-Amy: "Trainwreck" and "Ant-Man" PDF Print E-mail
Reviews
Written by Mike Schulz   
Saturday, 18 July 2015 12:07

Amy Schumer and Bill Hader in TrainwreckTRAINWRECK

Longtime admirers of Comedy Central’s Inside Amy Schumer could easily be troubled by director Judd Apatow’s Trainwreck, considering that by its finale, the wickedly smart, subversive, hysterical Schumer has morphed into a pretty standard rom-com heroine. (The transformation may be particularly dispiriting knowing that Schumer wrote the script.) As for me, I came to the party late, not having seen the star’s sketch-series output until a few months ago, so I’m still living happily in the Amy Schumer afterglow, and was grateful for the oftentimes very funny Trainwreck at least being better than standard Hollywood rom-coms. Schumer’s more die-hard fans may well bristle, but hey – I barely know the woman.

 
Da Minion Republic: "Minions," "The Gallows," and "Self/less" PDF Print E-mail
Reviews
Written by Mike Schulz   
Monday, 13 July 2015 10:34

MinionsMINIONS

The previews for the Despicable Me prequel-slash-spin-off Minions made me laugh out loud every single time I saw them ... the first dozen times I saw them. After the second dozen, though, I started to get a little nervous. By then, I had experienced roughly 72 collective minutes of these squat, yellow henchmen with their helium squawks and adorable bulging eyes (or, in some cases, eye), and my initially hearty laughter had been replaced by occasional grins and a smidge of irritation. Granted, I was only seeing three to five minutes of footage over and over, but would directors Kyle Balda’s and Pierre Coffin’s animated outing wind up feeling the same? Would a solid hour and a half of Minions, and Minions, be too much of a good thing? Answer: Not really. And also: Kind of.

 
Slumberless Party: "The Overnight" and "The Wolfpack" PDF Print E-mail
Reviews
Written by Mike Schulz   
Wednesday, 08 July 2015 13:15

Adam Scott and Taylor Schilling in The OvernightTHE OVERNIGHT

Even with a goatee, Adam Scott has such a sweet baby face, and can exude such endearing boyishness, that when you see him in an early playground scene in his latest film, you’re half-surprised that a more towering adult isn’t pushing him on a swing. Yet longtime fans know that Scott also possesses a canny understanding of how to employ his naturally guileless countenance for tension (as in the 2002 thriller High Crimes) or melancholy (HBO’s sadly ignored Tell Me You Love Me) or acerbic wit (Party Down, Parks & Recreation, and numerous et ceteras). And that chameleon-ic talent makes him perhaps perfectly cast in the new comedy The Overnight, writer/director Patrick Brice’s three-quarters-successful chronicling of an alternately invigorating and deeply uncomfortable grown-up sleepover.

 
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