Chicago, Six Other Metros Add More Than 60,000 Jobs in November PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Business & Economy
Written by Greg Rivara   
Monday, 30 December 2013 08:33

Temporary Layoffs Push Up Rate Outside Suburban Chicago

Not Seasonally Adjusted Unemployment Rates
Metropolitan Area   Nov. 2013*   Nov. 2012
Bloomington-Normal  7.0%  6.1%
Champaign-Urbana    7.9%  7.1%
Chicago-Joliet-Naperville 8.1%  8.3%
Danville      11.7% 9.4%
Davenport-Moline-Rock Isl.      6.5%  6.3%
Decatur       12.2% 10.1%
Kankakee-Bradley    10.7% 9.9%
Lake-Kenosha, IL-WI 8.0%  7.7%
Peoria  8.9%  7.5%
Rockford      11.0% 10.3%
Springfield   7.4%  6.9%
St. Louis (IL-Section)    8.4%  8.3%
* Data subject to revision.

CHICAGO – The November unemployment rate in the Chicago Joliet Naperville Metro Division fell .02 to reach 8.1 percent while temporary layoffs pushed rates higher elsewhere, according to preliminary data released today by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) and the Illinois Department of Employment Security (IDES). Not seasonally adjusted data compares November 2013 to November 2012.

Illinois businesses added jobs in seven metros.
Largest increases:

Chicago-Joliet-Naperville (+1.5 percent, +55,300),

Lake-Kenosha (+1.2 percent, +4,700),

Champaign-Urbana (+0.9 percent, +1,000).

Largest decreases:

Decatur (-3.0 percent, -1,600),

Peoria (-1.7 percent, -3,100), and

Bloomington-Normal (-1.0 percent, -900).

Much of these decreases are connected to a temporary slowdown in global manufacturing demand. Industry sectors recording job growth in the most metros: Education and Health Services (11 of 12), Leisure and Hospitality (eight of 12), and Other Services (seven of 12).

Not seasonally adjusted data compares the current month to the same month of the previous year. The
November 2013 not seasonally adjusted Illinois rate was 8.3 percent and 12.2 percent at its peak in this
economic cycle in January 2010. Nationally, the unemployment rate was 6.6 percent in November and 10.6 percent in January 2010 at its peak. The unemployment rate identifies those who are out of work and looking for work and is not tied to collecting unemployment insurance benefits. Historically, the state unemployment rate is higher than the national rate.

Total Non-farm Jobs (Not Seasonally Adjusted) – November 2013
Metropolitan Area   November 2013*   November 2012**  Over-the-Year Change
Bloomington-Normal MSA    91,300      92,200     -900
Champaign-Urbana MSA      109,400     108,400    1,000
Chicago-Joliet-Naperville Metro Div.  3,823,300    3,768,000     55,300
Danville MSA  29,900      29,800      100
Davenport-Moline-Rock Island MSA      185,000    184,900   100
Decatur MSA   51,100      52,700      -1,600
Kankakee-Bradley MSA      44,700      44,600      100
Lake County-Kenosha County Metro Div. 396,100    391,400 4,700
Peoria MSA    183,600     186,700     -3,100
Rockford MSA  150,700     151,200     -500
Springfield MSA     113,200     112,600     600
Illinois Section of St. Louis MSA     230,000    230,500     -500
*Preliminary    **Revised

Not Seasonally Adjusted Unemployment Rates (percent) for Local Counties and Areas Nov 13      Nov 12

Davenport-Rock Island-Moline IL-IA MSA
Rock Island County  7.1 % 6.7 %
Henry County  7.0 % 6.2 %
Mercer County    6.8 % 6.1 %
Scott County, IA    5.6 % 5.9 %

Cities
Rock Island City 7.3 % 7.4 %
Moline City   7.2 % 6.4 %
Galesburg City      9.3 % 8.2 %

Counties
Bureau County 9.0 % 8.6 %
Fulton County 10.0 %      8.9 %
Henderson County    6.2 % 7.3 %
Knox County   8.6 % 7.8 %
Stark County  10.2 %      7.9 %
Warren County 7.1 % 6.6 %
Whiteside County    9.3 % 8.3 %

Historically, the Illinois unemployment rate is higher than the national rate. Only six times since January 2000 has the state rate been lower than the national rate. The data is seasonally adjusted and includes times of both economic expansion and contraction.

Davenport-Moline-Rock Island IL-IA MSA

The not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate increased slightly to 6.5 percent in November 2013 from 6.3 percent in November 2012.  Non-farm employment increased from its year-ago level by +100. Job growth occurred in Construction (+700), Professional-Business Services (+500), Educational-Health Services (+200), Transportation-Warehousing-Utilities (+200), Wholesale Trade (+200), Other Services (+100), Leisure-Hospitality (+100), and Information (+100).

Declines were posted in Government (-1,500) and Manufacturing (-500) compared to November 2012. Illinois has added +281,400 private sector jobs since January 2010 when job growth returned to Illinois following nearly two years of monthly declines. State data is seasonally adjusted. Since January 2010, leading growth sectors in Illinois are Professional and Business Services (+116,400); Educational and Health Services (+61,000) and Trade, Transportation and Utilities (+58,700). Government has lost the most jobs since January 2010, down -28,600. The unemployment rate identifies those who are out of work and seeking employment. A person who exhausts benefits, or is ineligible, still will be reflected in the unemployment rate if they actively seek work. The IDES supports economic stability by administering unemployment benefits, collecting business contributions to fund those benefits, connecting employers with qualified job seekers, and providing economic information to assist career planning and economic development.

Note:

• Monthly 2012 unemployment rates and total non-farm jobs for Illinois metro areas were revised in February 2013, as required by the U.S. Dept. of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). Comments and tables distributed for prior metro area news releases should be discarded as any records or historical analysis previously cited may no longer be valid.

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This message is a service of the State of Illinois.  If you have any questions about this document, please contact the Illinois Office of Communication and Information (IOCI), Room 611, Stratton Office Building, Springfield, Illinois 62706, (217) 558-1548.

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