Agribusiness
USDA Announces Measures to Help Farmers Diversify Weed Control Efforts PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Agribusiness
Written by USDA Office of Communications   
Friday, 17 October 2014 13:35

WASHINGTON, Oct. 15, 2014 — Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack today announced several steps that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is taking to address the increase of herbicide resistant weeds in U.S. agricultural systems.

"Weed control in major crops is almost entirely accomplished with herbicides today," said Vilsack. "USDA, working in collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency, must continue to identify ways to encourage producers to adopt diverse tactics for weed management in addition to herbicide control. The actions we are taking today are part of this effort."

Today USDA is announcing several of the steps it is taking to help farmers manage their herbicide resistant weed problems in a more holistic and sustainable way:

  • USDA's Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) will offer financial assistance under its Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) for herbicide resistant weed control practices that utilize Integrated Pest Management plans and practices.
  • Later this year NRCS will be soliciting proposals under the Conservation Innovation Grants (CIG) Program for innovative conservation systems that address herbicide resistant weeds.
  • USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) will actively promote use of best management practices (BMPs) in design protocols for regulated authorized releases of genetically engineered (GE) crops and will include recommendations for BMPs with the authorization of field trials of HR crops.
  • USDA is partnering with the Weed Science Society of America (WSSA) and is providing funds to develop education and outreach materials for various stakeholders on managing herbicide–resistant weeds. The Secretary has directed Dr. Sheryl Kunickis, Director of the USDA Office of Pest Management Policy, as the point person leading this effort with the USDA.

The issue of herbicide resistant weeds has become one of increasing importance for agriculture. When herbicides are repeatedly used to control weeds, the weeds that survive herbicide treatment can multiply and spread.

With EPA's announcement today on the registration of new uses for herbicide mixtures containing the herbicides 2,4-D and glyphosate (in the Enlist® formulation) in conjunction with new genetically engineered crop varieties, farmers are being offered one more new tool to better manage emerging populations of herbicide-resistant weeds in corn and soybeans crops. In its decision for 2,4-D use on genetically modified corn and soybean, EPA has outlined new requirements for registrants as part of a product stewardship program.

The USDA Office of Pest Management Policy worked with EPA to address the issue of herbicide resistance through appropriate label language that will require registrants to develop a stewardship program for the herbicide, develop training and education on proper use of the product that includes diversifying weed management, investigate and report nonperformance, and develop and implement a remediation plan for suspected herbicide resistant weeds.

EPA intends to require the same stewardship plans for all new applications for product registration on genetically modified crops with the goal being to encourage effective resistance management while maintaining needed flexibility for growers.

USDA recognizes that the problem of herbicide resistant weed control will not be solved solely through the application of new herbicides. USDA has worked with the Weed Science Society of America for a number of years on identifying best management practices for farmers and on addressing impediments to adoption of those practices.

USDA will continue to work to ensure that growers have the diverse tools they need to address the management of herbicide resistant weeds.

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USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. To file a complaint of discrimination, write: USDA, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410 or call (866) 632-9992 (Toll-free Customer Service), (800) 877-8339 (Local or Federal relay), (866) 377-8642 (Relay voice users).


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USDA Announces 19 USB Farmer-Director Appointments PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Agribusiness
Written by United Soybean Board   
Wednesday, 15 October 2014 09:17
Fourteen returning, five new directors will be sworn in at annual meeting

ST. LOUIS (October 14, 2014) - Nineteen farmer-leaders will be sworn in as directors of the United Soybean Board (USB) in December, after their recent appointments by U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack.

The 19 soybean farmers from across the United States include five new appointees and 14 returning directors. These volunteer farmers invest soy checkoff funds on behalf of all U.S. soybean farmers in projects to increase the value of U.S. soybean meal and oil, ensure U.S. farmers and their customers maintain the freedom and infrastructure to operate, and meet the needs of U.S. soy’s customers.

“We’re looking forward to welcoming these new and returning farmer-leaders to the board,” says Jim Call, USB chairman and soybean farmer from Madison, Minnesota. “We know that they will work with their fellow USB directors in wisely investing checkoff dollars for the benefit of all U.S. soybean farmers.”

Appointed farmer-leaders include:

  • Angela M. Dee, Aliceville, Alabama*
  • Robert L. Stobaugh, Atkins, Arkansas*
  • Dwain L. Ford, Kinmundy, Illinois*
  • Michael A. Beard, Frankfort, Indiana*
  • Larry K. Marek, Riverside, Iowa*
  • Thomas E. Oswald, Cleghorn, Iowa
  • Craig M. Gigstad, Valley Falls, Kansas*
  • Keith N. Tapp, Sebree, Kentucky*
  • Belinda L. Burrier, Union Bridge, Maryland
  • Herbert N. Miller, Niles, Michigan
  • Scott G. Singlestad, Waseca, Minnesota*
  • James D. Sneed, Senatobia, Mississippi*
  • George L. Rone, Portageville, Missouri
  • Mike G. Korth, Randolph, Nebraska
  • Daniel J. Corcoran, Piketon, Ohio*
  • Ellie W. Green, Lynchburg, South Carolina*
  • Robert J. Metz, Peever, South Dakota*
  • David E. Nichols, Ridgely, Tennessee*
  • Thomas P. Rotello, Navasota, Texas*

*Indicates returning director

All appointees serve three-year terms, beginning Dec. 11, when they’ll be sworn in at USB’s annual meeting in St. Louis. Qualified State Soybean Boards (QSSBs) nominated all of the appointees.

The 70 farmer-directors of USB oversee the investments of the soy checkoff to maximize profit opportunities for all U.S. soybean farmers. These volunteers invest and leverage checkoff funds to increase the value of U.S. soy meal and oil, to ensure U.S. soybean farmers and their customers have the freedom and infrastructure to operate, and to meet the needs of U.S. soy’s customers. As stipulated in the federal Soybean Promotion, Research and Consumer Information Act, the USDA Agricultural Marketing Service has oversight responsibilities for USB and the soy checkoff.

For more information on the United Soybean Board, visit www.unitedsoybean.org
Visit us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/UnitedSoybeanBoard
Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/unitedsoy
View our YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/user/UnitedSoybeanBoard

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Soy Buyers Prefer Predictability of U.S. Shipments PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Agribusiness
Written by United Soybean Board   
Friday, 03 October 2014 13:26
Soy checkoff study compares cost, transit times of soy shipments from U.S., Brazil, Argentina

ST. LOUIS (October 2, 2014) - Some international buyers prefer U.S. soy to that from top competitors Brazil and Argentina because they can count on it reaching them in a timely manner, according to a new soy-checkoff-funded study.

In fact, foreign soy buyers often pay as much attention to the timeliness of a shipment delivery as they do to the price. That’s because late shipments can be expensive for buyers, as they incur costs in trying to find replacement crop, slowing down crush facilities and other problems that arise when shipments don’t arrive in the time frame that was promised.

“Our industry depends on the reliability of our transportation system to keep us competitive in the global market,” says Dwain Ford, soybean farmer from Kinmundy, Illinois, and United Soybean Board (USB) International Opportunities Target Area coordinator. “This study really shows the advantage the roads, rails and rivers give us and how important it is to maintain and improve our infrastructure.”

Conducted in partnership with the checkoff-supported Soy Transportation Coalition, the study gathered input from buyers in China, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam to get firsthand reports on the timeliness of shipments and the repercussions late shipments have on their businesses. In most of these markets, U.S. shipments were the most predictable, with several participants adding that they prefer to buy from the United States because of this predictability.

Argentina has the advantage when it comes to shipping costs because of its relatively short distances from the growing areas to major ports for export. But U.S. soy rises to the top because of the relatively short amount of time it takes for soybeans to move from the growing areas to export position, which greatly impacts the United States’ edge in delivery predictability. Even though U.S. soybeans have the longest distances to travel, the extensive U.S. rail and river infrastructures move these beans quickly, and the port infrastructure allows for timely loading and limited delays. Both Brazil and Argentina have significantly less rail and underdeveloped inland waterway systems, so roads are the main mode used to move products from growing areas to export position.

“It’s great to see the infrastructure here in the United States is still doing its job,” adds Ford. “But if our competitors continue to update their infrastructure and we don’t, we could easily fall behind. It’s vital to U.S. soybean farmers and the U.S. soy industry that we protect this advantage.”

The 70 farmer-directors of USB oversee the investments of the soy checkoff to maximize profit opportunities for all U.S. soybean farmers. These volunteers invest and leverage checkoff funds to increase the value of U.S. soy meal and oil, to ensure U.S. soybean farmers and their customers have the freedom and infrastructure to operate, and to meet the needs of U.S. soy’s customers. As stipulated in the federal Soybean Promotion, Research and Consumer Information Act, the USDA Agricultural Marketing Service has oversight responsibilities for USB and the soy checkoff.

For more information on the United Soybean Board, visit www.unitedsoybean.org
Visit us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/UnitedSoybeanBoard
Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/unitedsoy
View our YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/user/UnitedSoybeanBoard

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ISU Extension Calendar late-October 2014 PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Agribusiness
Written by Amanda Heitz   
Friday, 03 October 2014 13:12

Oct. 15, 2014 Right-of-Way, Forest, and Aquatic Pest Management, Scott County Extension Office,

9:00 am-11:30 am

Oct. 23, 2014 Mosquito and Public Health Pest Management, Scott County Extension Office,

9:00 am-11:30 am

Oct. 28, 2014 Scott County Extension Council Meeting, Scott County Extension Office, 7:00 pm

 
Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack to Announce New Support for America's Specialty Crop Producers PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Agribusiness
Written by USDA Office of Communications   
Thursday, 02 October 2014 08:01

2014 Farm Bill’s marquee specialty crop programs now providing funding

WASHINGTON, Oct. 1, 2014 – TOMORROW, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack will host a media conference call to announce new funding to help grow Florida’s, and the nation’s, specialty crop industries. Specialty crops include fruits and vegetables, as well as nuts and nursery products. The funding is being provided through the 2014 Farm Bill’s marquee specialty crop programs, which substantially increased specialty crop support for fruit and vegetable growers.

The 2014 Farm Bill provided historic support to strengthen rural communities by supporting local and regional markets and improving access to fresh, healthy, and nutritious high quality products for millions of Americans. It is one of relatively few bipartisan pieces of legislation passed during this session of Congress.

Thursday, Oct. 2, 2014
3:30 p.m. EDT

WHAT: Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack will host a media conference call to announce new funding to help grow Florida’s, and the nation’s, specialty crop industries.

 
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