Agribusiness
Soy Buyers Prefer Predictability of U.S. Shipments PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Agribusiness
Written by United Soybean Board   
Friday, 03 October 2014 13:26
Soy checkoff study compares cost, transit times of soy shipments from U.S., Brazil, Argentina

ST. LOUIS (October 2, 2014) - Some international buyers prefer U.S. soy to that from top competitors Brazil and Argentina because they can count on it reaching them in a timely manner, according to a new soy-checkoff-funded study.

In fact, foreign soy buyers often pay as much attention to the timeliness of a shipment delivery as they do to the price. That’s because late shipments can be expensive for buyers, as they incur costs in trying to find replacement crop, slowing down crush facilities and other problems that arise when shipments don’t arrive in the time frame that was promised.

“Our industry depends on the reliability of our transportation system to keep us competitive in the global market,” says Dwain Ford, soybean farmer from Kinmundy, Illinois, and United Soybean Board (USB) International Opportunities Target Area coordinator. “This study really shows the advantage the roads, rails and rivers give us and how important it is to maintain and improve our infrastructure.”

Conducted in partnership with the checkoff-supported Soy Transportation Coalition, the study gathered input from buyers in China, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam to get firsthand reports on the timeliness of shipments and the repercussions late shipments have on their businesses. In most of these markets, U.S. shipments were the most predictable, with several participants adding that they prefer to buy from the United States because of this predictability.

Argentina has the advantage when it comes to shipping costs because of its relatively short distances from the growing areas to major ports for export. But U.S. soy rises to the top because of the relatively short amount of time it takes for soybeans to move from the growing areas to export position, which greatly impacts the United States’ edge in delivery predictability. Even though U.S. soybeans have the longest distances to travel, the extensive U.S. rail and river infrastructures move these beans quickly, and the port infrastructure allows for timely loading and limited delays. Both Brazil and Argentina have significantly less rail and underdeveloped inland waterway systems, so roads are the main mode used to move products from growing areas to export position.

“It’s great to see the infrastructure here in the United States is still doing its job,” adds Ford. “But if our competitors continue to update their infrastructure and we don’t, we could easily fall behind. It’s vital to U.S. soybean farmers and the U.S. soy industry that we protect this advantage.”

The 70 farmer-directors of USB oversee the investments of the soy checkoff to maximize profit opportunities for all U.S. soybean farmers. These volunteers invest and leverage checkoff funds to increase the value of U.S. soy meal and oil, to ensure U.S. soybean farmers and their customers have the freedom and infrastructure to operate, and to meet the needs of U.S. soy’s customers. As stipulated in the federal Soybean Promotion, Research and Consumer Information Act, the USDA Agricultural Marketing Service has oversight responsibilities for USB and the soy checkoff.

For more information on the United Soybean Board, visit www.unitedsoybean.org
Visit us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/UnitedSoybeanBoard
Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/unitedsoy
View our YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/user/UnitedSoybeanBoard

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ISU Extension Calendar late-October 2014 PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Agribusiness
Written by Amanda Heitz   
Friday, 03 October 2014 13:12

Oct. 15, 2014 Right-of-Way, Forest, and Aquatic Pest Management, Scott County Extension Office,

9:00 am-11:30 am

Oct. 23, 2014 Mosquito and Public Health Pest Management, Scott County Extension Office,

9:00 am-11:30 am

Oct. 28, 2014 Scott County Extension Council Meeting, Scott County Extension Office, 7:00 pm

 
Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack to Announce New Support for America's Specialty Crop Producers PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Agribusiness
Written by USDA Office of Communications   
Thursday, 02 October 2014 08:01

2014 Farm Bill’s marquee specialty crop programs now providing funding

WASHINGTON, Oct. 1, 2014 – TOMORROW, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack will host a media conference call to announce new funding to help grow Florida’s, and the nation’s, specialty crop industries. Specialty crops include fruits and vegetables, as well as nuts and nursery products. The funding is being provided through the 2014 Farm Bill’s marquee specialty crop programs, which substantially increased specialty crop support for fruit and vegetable growers.

The 2014 Farm Bill provided historic support to strengthen rural communities by supporting local and regional markets and improving access to fresh, healthy, and nutritious high quality products for millions of Americans. It is one of relatively few bipartisan pieces of legislation passed during this session of Congress.

Thursday, Oct. 2, 2014
3:30 p.m. EDT

WHAT: Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack will host a media conference call to announce new funding to help grow Florida’s, and the nation’s, specialty crop industries.

 
Branstad signs Harvest Weight proclamation PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Agribusiness
Written by Office of the Governor of the State of Iowa   
Wednesday, 01 October 2014 16:02

Proclamation to aid farmers in hauling harvest in an efficient and effective manner

 

(DES MOINES) – Gov. Terry E. Branstad today signed a proclamation to allow the transportation of overweight loads of soybeans, corn, hay, straw, silage and stover.  The proclamation takes effect today, October 1, 2014, and expires after 60 days.

“I am pleased today to sign this proclamation to allow Iowa farmers to move their crop yields in an effective and efficient manner,” said Branstad. “Iowa’s farmers are a critical component of Iowa’s economy and this proclamation will ensure they’re able to transport their crop ahead of deteriorating weather conditions.”

“Governor Branstad and I continue to look for ways in which government can assist Iowans and today’s harvest weight proclamation is another way we’re able to ensure producers can get their yield out of the fields and to market,” said Lt. Gov. Kim Reynolds.

This proclamation is intended to allow vehicles transporting soybeans, corn, hay, straw, silage and stover to be overweight, not exceeding 90,000 pounds gross weight, without a permit, but only for the duration of this proclamation.  This action is intended to allow loads transported on all highways within Iowa, excluding the interstate system, and those which do not exceed a maximum of 90,000 pounds gross weight, do not exceed the maximum axle weight limit determined under the nonprimary highway maximum gross weight table in Iowa Code §321.463(5)(b), by more than twelve and one-half percent (12.5%), do not exceed the legal maximum axle weight limit of 20,000 pounds, and comply with posted limits on roads and bridges.

The Iowa Department of Transportation is directed to monitor the operation of this proclamation to assure the public’s safety and facilitate the movement of the trucks involved.

The signed proclamation can be found here.

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New Calculator Can Help Soybean Farmers with Seed Decisions PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Agribusiness
Written by United Soybean Board   
Wednesday, 01 October 2014 13:33
How much does growing IP soybeans really cost?

ST. LOUIS (September 30, 2014) - Facing lower soybean cash prices this year, farmers are looking for opportunities to add to their bottom lines. Growing identity-preserved (IP) soybeans is one option for additional profit opportunities, but the costs can seem overwhelming to farmers thinking about getting started.

U.S.-soy-industry-led board QUALISOY developed a calculator that can help farmers determine how much profit they can add by growing IP soybeans, including high oleic varieties.

The calculator, based on a Purdue University study, helps farmers navigate the typical steps required to produce and segregate IP soybeans and gives them an estimate of added profit potential. The United Soybean Board’s Value Task Force funded the study.

“The charge of the Value Task Force is to try to find the next big thing that could really create opportunities for soybean farmers, and we feel that there is a lot of opportunity in IP soybeans,” says Dan Corcoran, a soybean farmer from Piketon, Ohio, and chair of the Value Task Force. “Whether a farmer has ever grown IP soybeans before or not, this tool will help determine the potential value that is out there.”

This calculator, available for use on http://soyinnovation.com/inputs-handling/, also gives a quick look into the limited costs associated with growing IP or high oleic soybeans.

“The soybean calculator is easy to access and has straightforward questions,” says Corcoran. “It takes you on a logical path to get a basis for non-IP products and what it takes to deliver a crop. Then it goes into the additional costs and revenue associated with growing IP soybeans.

“This tool helps you make an educated business decision by removing a large amount of guesswork. It gives soybean farmers a good overview of exactly what we need to invest when we choose to grow IP.”

Right now, opportunities available for soybean farmers to grow IP include non-GMO, food-grade and high oleic soybeans. However, high oleic soybeans have easier handling procedures compared with other IP soybeans. The calculator takes those factors into consideration when delivering its results.

“With the current state of soybean prices, it is important for soybean farmers to grow a product that has increasing demand,” concludes Corcoran. “This concept of growing a product that customers are demanding is beneficial for farmers in general.”

The 70 farmer-directors of USB oversee the investments of the soy checkoff to maximize profit opportunities for all U.S. soybean farmers. These volunteers invest and leverage checkoff funds to increase the value of U.S. soy meal and oil, to ensure U.S. soybean farmers and their customers have the freedom and infrastructure to operate, and to meet the needs of U.S. soy’s customers. As stipulated in the federal Soybean Promotion, Research and Consumer Information Act, the USDA Agricultural Marketing Service has oversight responsibilities for USB and the soy checkoff.

For more information on the United Soybean Board, visit www.unitedsoybean.org
Visit us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/UnitedSoybeanBoard
Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/unitedsoy
View our YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/user/UnitedSoybeanBoard

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