Agribusiness
Ribbons Awarded for Farm Crops at Iowa State Fair PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Agribusiness
Written by Lori Chappell   
Tuesday, 14 August 2012 13:32

Farm crops took to the judging table in the John Deere Agriculture Building sponsored by Alliant Energy on Thursday at the 2012 Iowa State Fair.

Complete results below:

FIELD CORN

Single Ear

1) Red Corn Farm, Melvin

2) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

3) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

4) David Klindt, Bettendorf

5) James Klindt, Bettendorf

6) Kevin Glanz, Manchester

 

Longest Ear

1) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

2) Sterling Weeda, Holstein

3) Dillon Weeda, Holstein

4) Julie Weeda, Holstein

5) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

6) Paul White, Ames

 

Ten Ears, Yellow Corn

1) James Klindt, Bettendorf

2) Kevin Glanz, Manchester

3) Becky Poduska, Chelsea

4) Lynne Pfantz, State Center

5) David Klindt, Bettendorf

6) Jay Van Wert, Hampton

 

Ten Ears, White Corn

1) David Klindt, Bettendorf

2) James Klindt, Bettendorf

3) Lynne Pfantz, State Center

4) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

5) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

6) Red Corn Farm, Melvin

 

Ten Ears, Open-Pollinated Corn

1) Red Corn Farm, Melvin

2) James Klindt, Bettendorf

3) David Klindt, Bettendorf

4) Mary Zelle, Waverly

5) Ronald Zelle, Waverly

 

Thirty Ears

1) James Klindt, Bettendorf

2) David Klindt, Bettendorf

3) Ronald Zelle, Waverly

4) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

5) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

6) Jay Van Wert, Hampton

 

Full Gallon Shelled Corn

1) David Klindt, Bettendorf

2) James Klindt, Bettendorf

3) Red Corn Farm, Melvin

4) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

5) Jay Van Wert, Hampton

6) Kevin Glanz, Manchester

 

Standard Bushel Basket Ear Field Corn

1) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

2) James Klindt, Bettendorf

3) David Klindt, Bettendorf

4) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

5) Lynne Pfantz, State Center

6) Oxford Farms, Cambridge

 

First Time Exhibitors, Yellow Corn

1) Steve Murty, Gladbrook

2) Kevin Glanz, Manchester

3) Thomas Huck, Waverly

 

New Crop, Yellow Corn

1) James Klindt, Bettendorf

2) Lynne Pfantz, State Center

3) David Klindt, Bettendorf

4) Dean Stormer, Bridgewater

5) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

 

New Crop, White Corn

1) James Klindt, Bettendorf

2) David Klindt, Bettendorf

 

Ornamental Corn

1) Red Corn Farm, Melvin

2) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

3) Dwight Sanders, Vinton

4) David Klindt, Bettendorf

 

Sweepstakes: James Klindt, Bettendorf

 

First Place Overall: James Klindt, Bettendorf

 

FORAGES, GRASSES AND LEGUMES

Alfalfa

1) David Klindt, Bettendorf

2) James Klindt, Bettendorf

3) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

4) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

 

Alsike Clover

1) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

2) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

3) Ronald Zelle, Waverly

 

Birdsfoot Trefoil

1) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

2) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

3) Jay Van Wert, Hampton

4) Mary Zelle, Waverly

 

Smooth Bromegrass

1) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

2) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

 

Medium Red Clover

1) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

2) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

3) David Klindt, Bettendorf

4) Ronald Zelle, Waverly

 

Millet

1) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

2) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

 

Orchard Grass

1) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

2) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

3) Ronald Zelle, Waverly

4) Mary Zelle, Waverly

 

Reed Canarygrass

1) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

2) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

3) Mary Zelle, Waverly

4) Ronald Zelle, Waverly

 

Sudan

1) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

2) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

 

Sweetclover

1) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

2) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

3) Ronald Zelle, Waverly

4) Mary Zelle, Waverly

 

Timothy

1) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

2) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

3) Jay Van Wert, Hampton

4) Ronald Zelle, Waverly

 

Any Other

1) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

2) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

3) Jay Van Wert, Hampton

4) Ronald Zelle, Waverly

 

Sweepstakes: Ginger Werner, Chelsea

 

POPCORN

Commercial, White Hybrid Popcorn

1) Becky Poduska, Chelsea

2) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

3) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

 

Commercial, Yellow Hybrid Popcorn

1) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

2) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

3) Dawn Troutner, Melbourne

 

Commercial, Mushroom Hybrid Popcorn

1) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

2) Becky Poduska, Chelsea

3) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

 

Ornamental, Japanese Hulless/White Rice Popcorn

1) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

2) Red Corn Farm, Melvin

3) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

 

Ornamental, Strawberry Popcorn

1) Red Corn Farm, Melvin

2) Becky Poduska, Chelsea

3) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

4) Lynne Pfantz, State Center

 

Ornamental, Lady Finger Type Popcorn

1) Becky Poduska, Chelsea

2) Dawn Troutner, Melbourne

3) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

4) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

 

Ornamental, Any Other Popcorn

1) Red Corn Farm, Melvin

2) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

3) Becky Poduska, Chelsea

4) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

 

Ornamental, Shelled Popcorn

1) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

2) Lynne Pfantz, State Center

3) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

4) Becky Poduska, Chelsea

 

Sweepstakes: Ginger Werner, Chelsea

 

SHEAF GRAINS

Brome Grass for Seed

1) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

2) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

3) Jay Van Wert, Hampton

4) Ronald Zelle, Waverly

 

Millet for Seed

1) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

2) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

 

Early Oats

1) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

2) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

3) Mary Zelle, Waverly

4) Ronald Zelle, Waverly

 

Mid Season Oats

1) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

2) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

3) Jay Van Wert, Hampton

 

Late Season Oats

1) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

2) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

 

Orchard Grass

1) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

2) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

 

Rye in Straw

1) David Klindt, Bettendorf

2) Jay Van Wert, Hampton

3) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

4) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

 

Grain Sorghum

1) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

2) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

3) Casey Cortum, Norwalk

 

Spring Wheat in Straw

1) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

2) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

3) Ronald Zelle, Waverly

4) Jay Van Wert, Hampton

 

Winter Wheat in Straw

1) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

2) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

 

Sweepstakes: Chuck Werner, Chelsea

 

SMALL GRAINS AND LEGUMES

Early Oats

1) None Awarded

2) David Klindt, Bettendorf

3) James Petersen, Knoxville

4) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

 

Mid Season Oats

1) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

2) David Klindt, Bettendorf

3) Lynne Pfantz, State Center

4) Thomas Huck, Waverly

 

Late Season Oats

1) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

2) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

 

Oats - Any Other Officially Recognized Variety

1) Ronald Zelle, Waverly

2) Jay Van Wert, Hampton

3) David Klindt, Bettendorf

4) Dwight Sanders, Vinton

 

Red Clover Seed

1) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

2) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

 

Spring Wheat

1) None Awarded

2) Ronald Zelle, Waverly

 

Winter Wheat

1) David Klindt, Bettendorf

 

Any Other

1) David Klindt, Bettendorf

2) Willard Hoskin, Keosauqua

3) Steve Murty, Gladbrook

 

SOYBEANS

Early Soybeans

1) Mary Zelle, Waverly

2) Ronald Zelle, Waverly

3) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

4) Rick Baumhover, Chariton

5) Lynne Pfantz, State Center

6) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

 

Mid Season Soybeans

1) Ronald Zelle, Waverly

2) James Klindt, Bettendorf

3) Thomas Huck, Waverly

4) Mary Zelle, Waverly

5) Jay Van Wert, Hampton

6) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

 

Late Season Soybeans

1) Mary Zelle, Waverly

2) Oxford Farms, Cambridge

3) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

4) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

5) Ronald Zelle, Waverly

6) Dean Stormer, Bridgewater

 

Specialty Food Soybean

1) Kevin Glanz, Manchester

2) Mary Zelle, Waverly

3) Ronald Zelle, Waverly

 

Soybean Bundles

1) Jay Van Wert, Hampton

2) Mary Zelle, Waverly

3) Chuck Werner, Chelsea

4) Ronald Zelle, Waverly

5) Ginger Werner, Chelsea

6) Dean Stormer, Bridgewater

 

Sweepstakes

1) Mary Zelle, Waverly

 

First Place Overall (classes 37-39)

1) Mary Zelle, Waverly

 

First Place Overall (class 40)

1) Kevin Glanz, Manchester won

 

“Nothing Compares” to the 2012 Iowa State Fair, August 9-19. The Fairgrounds are located at East 30th and East University Avenue, just 10 minutes east of downtown Des Moines, and are open 7 a.m. to 1 a.m. each day of the Fair. Exhibit hours may vary. For more information, call 800/545-FAIR or visit iowastatefair.org.

 

* * *

 
Agriculture Secretary Vilsack Announces Economic Development Funding to Create Jobs, Economic Opportunity and Strengthen Rural Communities PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Agribusiness
Written by USDA Office of Communications   
Tuesday, 14 August 2012 11:09

DES MOINES, Iowa, August 14, 2012 – Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced today that 41 community-based organizations have been selected for funding to create jobs and support rural business development.

"USDA has a strong partnership with rural citizens and communities to bring increased economic opportunity," Vilsack said. "These grants are investments that will help organizations build the capacity and expertise of local businesses, which in turn will spur economic activity and strengthen rural economies. "

For example, in Polk County, the Iowa Economic Development Authority is receiving a $200,000 grant to help revitalize the historical commercial district. The authority will work with businesses on ways to highlight local events and community attractions, take advantage of tax credits, and promote local attractions through branding and marketing campaigns.

In Longmont, Colo., the First Nations Development Institute has been selected for a $50,000 grant to provide training and technical assistance to a Native American non-profit organization and two tribes to assist with capacity building. Zender Environmental Health and Research Group is receiving a $183,862 grant to train unemployed, rural Alaskan members in of seven Federally recognized Tribes for environmental technician jobs.

The funding announced today is being provided through the Rural Community Development Initiative Program (RCDI). It helps community-based development organizations, federally recognized Indian tribes and other groups promote economic growth in low-income, rural communities. Recipients are required to obtain matching funds, which increase the value of the grants.

Funding for each project is contingent upon the recipient meeting the terms of the grant agreement. For a complete list of projects, click here.

President Obama's plan for rural America has brought about historic investment and resulted in stronger rural communities. Under the President's leadership, these investments in housing, community facilities, businesses and infrastructure have empowered rural America to continue leading the way – strengthening America's economy, small towns and rural communities. USDA's investments in rural communities support the rural way of life that stands as the backbone of our American values. President Obama and Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack are committed to a smarter use of Federal resources to foster sustainable economic prosperity and ensure the government is a strong partner for businesses, entrepreneurs and working families in rural communities.

USDA, through its Rural Development mission area, has an active portfolio of more than $170 billion in loans and loan guarantees. These programs are designed to improve the economic stability of rural communities, businesses, residents, farmers and ranchers and improve the quality of life in rural America.

#

USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. To file a complaint of discrimination, write: USDA, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410 or call (866) 632-9992 (Toll-free Customer Service), (800) 877-8339 (Local or Federal relay), (866) 377-8642 (Relay voice users).


#

 
Plump Pumpkin Pummels Competition at State Fair PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Agribusiness
Written by Lori Chappell   
Tuesday, 14 August 2012 11:07

DES MOINES, IA (08/14/2012)(readMedia)-- The giant pumpkin grown by David Miller of Riverside tipped the scales at 933 pounds to claim the top spot and a $1,300 prize in the Big Pumpkin Contest judged Friday at the 2012 Iowa State Fair.

Marc Petersen of Clinton took second place and $750 with a pumpkin weighing in at 928 pounds. Dan Boelman of Pella captured third place and $550 with a pumpkin weighing 903 pounds. Fourth place and $350 were won by Don Young of Des Moines for his 880 pound pumpkin.

Complete results below:

1) David Miller, 933 lbs., Riverside

2) Marc Petersen, 928 lbs., Clinton

3) Dan Boelman, 903 lbs., Pella

4) Don Young, 880 lbs., Des Moines

5) John Shepherd, 852 lbs., Charlotte

6) Chris Schultz, 848 lbs., Decorah

7) Joe Cristoforo, 832 lbs., Mount Pleasant

8) Martin Schnicker, 611 lbs., Mount Pleasant

9) Michael Otto, 565 lbs., Newton

"Nothing Compares" to the 2012 Iowa State Fair, August 9-19. The Fairgrounds are located at East 30th and East University Avenue, just 10 minutes east of downtown Des Moines, and are open 7 a.m. to 1 a.m. each day of the Fair. Exhibit hours may vary. For more information, call 800/545-FAIR or visit iowastatefair.org.

* * *

 
Agriculture Secretary Vilsack Announces Funding for Projects to Boost Renewable Energy Production, Reduce Energy Consumption PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Agribusiness
Written by USDA Office of Communications   
Tuesday, 14 August 2012 10:43

DES MOINES, IOWA, August 14, 2012 – Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack today announced that 106 projects in 29 states, Guam and Puerto Rico have been selected for funding to produce renewable energy and make energy efficiency improvements. Funding is made available through USDA Rural Development's Rural Energy for America Program (REAP), which is authorized by the 2008 Farm Bill.

"The Obama Administration is helping agricultural producers and rural small business owners across the country reduce their energy costs and consumption," Vilsack said. "This is part of the President's 'all-of-the-above' energy strategy, which involves expanding support for traditional as well as alternative energy sources. Stable energy costs create an environment for sustainable job growth in rural America."

For example, in Washington County, Iowa, Andrew McCall is receiving a guaranteed loan to construct a 50 kilowatt (kW) wind turbine at his agricultural business. The turbine is expected to generate approximately 103,200 kilowatt hours (kWh) of electricity annually, enough to meet the annual requirements of nine homes. In Adair, Iowa, Meadow Ridge Wind Energy, LLC is receiving a guaranteed loan that will be used to purchase and install a 1.5 million kW wind turbine. The turbine is expected to generate 5.77 million kWh of electricity annually, enough to meet the annual electricity requirements of more than 500 homes.

In Calumet, Wis., WTE-Dallmann LLC is receiving a REAP grant to help fund the installation of an anaerobic digester that will generate more than 4.8 million kWh of electricity, enough to power 420 homes annually. The power will be sold to the local electric utility.

Anaerobic digester technology is a proven method of converting waste products, such as manure, into electricity. Anaerobic digesters are in concert with an agreement Secretary Vilsack signed with U.S. dairy producers in Copenhagen, Denmark, in 2009 to accelerate the adoption of innovative manure-to-energy projects on American dairy farms.

REAP provides grants and loan guarantees for agricultural producers and rural small businesses to reduce energy consumption and costs, use renewable energy technologies in their operations and conduct feasibility studies for renewable energy projects. For a complete listing of recipients announced today, click here: http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/SupportDocuments/rdREAPRecipientsAugust2012.pdf.

President Obama's plan for rural America has brought about historic investment and resulted in stronger rural communities. Under the President's leadership, these investments in housing, community facilities, businesses and infrastructure have empowered rural America to continue leading the way – strengthening America's economy, small towns and rural communities. USDA's investments in rural communities support the rural way of life that stands as the backbone of our American values. President Obama and Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack are committed to a smarter use of Federal resources to foster sustainable economic prosperity and ensure the government is a strong partner for businesses, entrepreneurs and working families in rural communities.

USDA, through its Rural Development mission area, has an active portfolio of more than $170 billion in loans and loan guarantees. These programs are designed to improve the economic stability of rural communities, businesses, residents, farmers and ranchers and improve the quality of life in rural America.

#

USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. To file a complaint of discrimination, write: USDA, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410 or call (866) 632-9992 (Toll-free Customer Service), (800) 877-8339 (Local or Federal relay), (866) 377-8642 (Relay voice users).


#

 
US Grains Council Commentary of USDA’s August WASDE Repor PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Agribusiness
Written by Marri Carrow   
Tuesday, 14 August 2012 10:04

WASHINGTON, D.C., AUGUST 13, 2012 -- In its monthly agricultural supply/demand update the U.S. Department of Agriculture on August 10 again lowered the outlook for U.S. corn production, reflecting the continued deterioration of this year's crop due to the once-in-a-lifetime drought that affects most of the U.S. corn belt.

The latest USDA projection lowers U.S. corn production to 274 million metric tons (10.8 billion bushels), down almost 40 million tons (1.6 billion bushels) from last year, and the lowest since 2006. World corn production is estimated at 849 million tons (33.4 billion bushels), down 27 million tons (1.1 billion bushels) from last year, but 19 million tons (748 million bushels) higher than 2010/2011 due to higher production from China, Brazil and Argentina.

With this large reduction in U.S. corn supplies, higher prices are expected to ration demand during the coming year. USDA projects that total world corn use will decline about 7 million tons (275.6 million bushels) from last year, while U.S. total use will drop 25 million tons (984.2 million bushels) — feed use down 12 million tons (472.4 million bushels), corn use for ethanol down 12.7 million tons (500 million bushels), and exports down 6.3 million tons (248 million bushels). USDA expects world corn imports to decline by almost 7 million tons (275.6 million bushels), while non-U.S. feed use will continue to grow, up 13 million tons (511.8 million bushels) from last year to 405 million tons (15.9 billion bushels).

From a broader perspective, world coarse grain feed use (including mainly corn, sorghum and barley) will be essentially unchanged from last year at 660 million tons, compared with 658.5 million tons in 2011/12.

Countries will respond to the tight corn supplies and higher prices in the coming year in different ways according the USDA estimate. For example, Japan and South Korea imports are projected be unchanged from 2011 to 2012. China's corn imports likely will decrease by 3 million tons (118.1 million bushels) due partly to a record domestic corn harvest of 200 million tons (7.9 million bushels), which is up 7 million tons (275.6 million bushels) from last year.

Globally, all corn users will face the challenge of higher prices and the need for increased efficiency, careful risk management and creative marketing strategies during the coming year. As the projections for U.S. corn use demonstrate, the high prices will ration demand in all markets and in all sectors (feed, food and fuel). Also, the relatively smaller decline in U.S. exports compared to domestic use reflects the resilience of global feed demand.

Despite the decreases projected for U.S. corn production, the United States remains open to trade. In the coming year it will be vital that all exporting countries follow the U.S. example: Open markets, transparent market information and careful planning can help us all work through the coming year.

Agricultural production depends each year on weather factors beyond the control of governments or farmers. But agriculture and food production are basically optimistic lines of work. Each year U.S. farmers plant with hope, and do their best with what nature provides at harvest. U.S. farmers use the best genetics, technology and management practices to grow grains for the world market. As they prepare to harvest this year's disappointing crop, they look forward to normal weather and a record harvest in 2013.

- 30 -

The U.S. Grains Council is a private, non-profit partnership of farmers and agribusinesses committed to building and expanding international markets for U.S. barley, corn, grain sorghum and their products. The Council is headquartered in Washington, D.C., and has nine international offices that oversee programs in more than 50 countries. Financial support from our private industry members, including state checkoffs, agribusinesses, state entities and others, triggers federal matching funds from the USDA resulting in a combined program value of more than $28.3 million.

The U.S. Grains Council does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation or marital/family status. Persons with disabilities, who require alternative means for communication of program information, should contact the U.S. Grains Council

 
<< Start < Prev 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 Next > End >>

Page 101 of 180