Agribusiness
Gov. Branstad joins lawsuit opposing a California law that discriminates against Iowa egg producers PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Agribusiness
Written by Office of the Governor of the State of Iowa   
Tuesday, 11 March 2014 08:06

Takes a stand for Iowa farmers against unconstitutional California law

 

(DES MOINES) – Gov. Branstad today joined a lawsuit in the Eastern District of California opposing California’s egg-production law that discriminates against Iowa’s egg producers.

Gov. Branstad, along with other five other states, argues that California’s egg-production law is unconstitutional and violates the commerce clause.

“The burdensome law from the State of California effectively regulates the industry across state lines, hurts Iowa agriculture and is detrimental to Iowa egg producers,” said Branstad. “Iowa is by far the leading egg producing state in the nation. This law is an unwarranted burden being imposed on Iowa’s producers by another state and violates the interstate commerce clause of the United States Constitution.”

Iowa’s egg farmers lead the nation in egg production by producing nearly 15 billion eggs per year.  Almost one out of every five eggs produced in the United States are produced in Iowa.  The Iowa egg industry contributes about $2 billion in total sales and impacts about 8,000 jobs.

“Governor Branstad and I know a strong agricultural economy is critical to our continued economic growth,” said Iowa Lt. Governor Kim Reynolds. “California’s law adversely affects Iowa agricultural jobs and we believe its negative effects and regulations felt by egg producers across the country is a violation of the commerce clause. We’re pleased that Democrats and Republicans are coming together in support of agriculture and against onerous regulations.”

The lawsuit, which was filed by Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster and co-signed by the attorney generals of Nebraska, Oklahoma, Alabama, Kentucky and Gov. Branstad, argues that the court should rule that California’s law violates the Commerce Clause of the U.S. Constitution.  The commerce clause prohibits any state from enacting legislation that regulates conduct wholly outside its borders, protects its own citizens from out-of-state competition, or places undue burdens on interstate commerce.

“California’s effort to unconstitutionally limit the ability of Iowa farmers to access California’s consumers must be stopped.   I support all efforts to uphold the right of Iowa farmers to sell their products, including eggs, in every state free from unconstitutional restraints imposed by any state,” said Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Bill Northey.

California’s law puts unnecessary burdens on Iowa farms which could force some Iowa farmers out of business.

Facts about Iowa egg production

  • Iowa is the number on state in egg production.  Iowa farmers produce over 14.4 billion eggs per year.
  • Approximately 9.1% of those eggs - 1.07 billion eggs per year - are sold in California.
  • Iowa farmers export more eggs to California than any other state.
  • 30% of the eggs imported to California are produced in Iowa.

The full Amended Complaint can be read here.

 

###

For more information, please visit www.governor.iowa.gov.

 
Soy Checkoff Honors Orf, Muench for Research Contributions PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Agribusiness
Written by United Soybean Board   
Tuesday, 04 March 2014 13:30

ST. LOUIS (March 3, 2014) – The soy checkoff recently presented its highest honors to two men: one who has devoted more than 30 years developing new soybean varieties that U.S. soybean farmers are using in their fields today and another who helped pioneer the soy checkoff’s groundbreaking production-research program.

The soy checkoff presented its Outstanding Achievement Award to University of Minnesota researcher and educator James Orf, Ph.D. Orf is credited with creating more than 50 general-purpose soybean varieties, as well as more than 60 special-purpose varieties in use throughout Minnesota.

The soy checkoff’s Excellence in Meal Award went to Stephen Muench, Ph.D., who for 15 years served as a liaison between United Soybean Board (USB) and many of the scientists conducting checkoff-funded research before retiring in 2013. Muench helped lay the foundation for USB’s production-research activities and was instrumental in the development of USB’s soybean composition breeding programs, which served as the beginning of the Better Bean Initiative, the beginning of USB’s efforts at soybean quality improvement.

“This is a great honor, and it makes me want to work even harder to make sure that the things I do have value not only for the farmers who grow soybeans, but for all consumers who use these products,” says Orf.

The 70 farmer-directors of USB oversee the investments of the soy checkoff to maximize profit opportunities for all U.S. soybean farmers. These volunteers invest and leverage checkoff funds to increase the value of U.S. soy meal and oil, to ensure U.S. soybean farmers and their customers have the freedom and infrastructure to operate, and to meet the needs of U.S. soy’s customers. As stipulated in the federal Soybean Promotion, Research and Consumer Information Act, the USDA Agricultural Marketing Service has oversight responsibilities for USB and the soy checkoff.

For more information on the United Soybean Board, visit www.unitedsoybean.org
Visit us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/UnitedSoybeanBoard
Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/unitedsoy
View our YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/user/UnitedSoybeanBoard

###

 
Soy Checkoff Harnesses Industry to Combat Herbicide-Resistant Weeds PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Agribusiness
Written by United Soybean Board   
Friday, 28 February 2014 09:43
U.S. agriculture takes action to promote production practices to manage these costly weeds

ST. LOUIS (February 27, 2014) – Two billion dollars annually: Only a problem this large and costly could bring together private industry, universities from across the country and farmer-led organizations to provide farmers with answers.

That’s how much University of Wisconsin researcher Vince Davis estimates herbicide-resistant weeds cost U.S. farmers each year.

To help fight this loss, the soy checkoff recently took the lead in creating the Take Action program to help farmers implement production practices on their farms that can manage herbicide-resistant weeds. Universities and herbicide providers have joined the effort, and all are promoting a unified approach to weed management.

“Diversification is the most important thing farmers can do to manage these weeds,” says Davis. “This includes diversification of effective herbicide modes of action, diversified weed-management practices and also utilizing non-herbicide control options such as judicious tillage, cleaning equipment for weed seed and diversified crop rotations. Weeds develop resistance more quickly when production systems remain static.”

Take Action recently launched a website, www.TakeActionOnWeeds.com, with interactive guides and other information on how to diversify weed management.

“What makes the Take Action program unique is the support from all the different organizations, private industry and universities,” says Jim Call, United Soybean Board (USB) chairman and soybean farmer from Madison, Minn. “It really shows how big of an issue herbicide-resistant weeds are and how they impact all of agriculture.”

In addition to the checkoff, other supporters of the Take Action program include Cotton Incorporated, the National Association of Wheat Growers, the National Corn Growers Association, the United Sorghum Checkoff, BASF, Bayer, DuPont, Dow, Monsanto, Syngenta and universities throughout the United States.

The 70 farmer-directors of USB oversee the investments of the soy checkoff to maximize profit opportunities for all U.S. soybean farmers. These volunteers invest and leverage checkoff funds to increase the value of U.S. soy meal and oil, to ensure U.S. soybean farmers and their customers have the freedom and infrastructure to operate, and to meet the needs of U.S. soy’s customers. As stipulated in the federal Soybean Promotion, Research and Consumer Information Act, the USDA Agricultural Marketing Service has oversight responsibilities for USB and the soy checkoff.

For more information on the United Soybean Board, visit www.unitedsoybean.org
Visit us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/UnitedSoybeanBoard
Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/unitedsoy
View our YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/user/UnitedSoybeanBoard

###

 
USGC Urges US Farmers, Handlers, Exporters to Strictly Adhere to Stewardship Program Statement from the U.S. Grains Council President and CEO Tom Sleight PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Agribusiness
Written by Marri Carrow   
Friday, 28 February 2014 09:07

“The U.S. Grains Council welcomes the announcement of an aggressive stewardship program for the release of Syngenta seed trait Agrisure Duracade to minimize the risk of export trade disruption. It is important for all sectors of the value chain -- individual farmers, technology providers, shippers and exporters alike -- to recognize the potentially significant international implications of their actions. The Council therefore urges producers who choose to plant Agrisure Duracade in 2014 to adhere carefully to their stewardship responsibilities in order to minimize the risk to U.S. export sales.

“Today’s unfortunate reality is that biotechnology approval systems around the world are not synchronous. In addition, some countries still lack effective, trade-enabling policies regarding the low level presence (LLP) of unapproved biotech events in grain shipments. Inadvertent commingling is almost certain to occur in the high volume U.S. commodity handling system, and modern testing methods are likely to detect even trace levels of unapproved events. The presence of unapproved events in the export stream therefore carries a significant risk of major international trade disruptions. Given the increase in corn production in competitor countries and the ability of buyers to source anywhere in the world, leakage of unapproved events may even result in the closure of some major markets to U.S. corn exports for an indefinite period.

“The U.S. Grains Council represents a wide variety of members across the value chain committed to maintaining an open and fair grain trading system around the world. We recognize the desire of producers to deploy new technology as soon as it becomes available. We recognize also that continued technology development is essential to achieving global food security and creating new opportunities for producers and agribusinesses. We believe, finally, that countries lacking a functioning, science based regulatory system ought not to enjoy a de facto veto over U.S. technology deployment. At the same time, however, the risk of costly trade disruption is significant and should be taken seriously by the entire value chain.

“There is no easy solution to these conflicting goals. In the short term, we urge all stakeholders to weigh the consequences of their actions, recognize the international implications of planting and marketing decisions, and stringently adhere to their stewardship responsibilities. In the long run, we encourage all parties to join the Council in working for a resolution of the low-level presence and asynchronous approval issues, which is the solution ultimately needed to serve the common interests of producers, agribusinesses, and consumers around the world.”

-30-

The U.S. Grains Council is a private, non-profit partnership of farmers and agribusinesses committed to building and expanding international markets for U.S. barley, corn, grain sorghum and their products. The Council is headquartered in Washington, D.C., and has nine international offices that oversee programs in more than 50 countries. Financial support from our private industry members, including state checkoffs, agribusinesses, state entities and others, triggers federal matching funds from the USDA resulting in a combined program value of more than $26.5 million.

The U.S. Grains Council does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation or marital/family status. Persons with disabilities, who require alternative means for communication of program information, should contact the U.S. Grains Council.

 
Training to be Held for 4-H Leaders PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Agribusiness
Written by Amanda Heitz   
Thursday, 27 February 2014 15:08

Iowa State University Extension and Outreach 4-H Youth Development staff announces statewide trainings for all new 4-H Club, Clover Kid and Project Leaders. This training is targeted to those who are beginning as volunteers or those with three years or less experience. The training is open to all volunteers and current club leaders are encouraged to attend if they have not attended before.

Advantages of this training program include: learning about the role of a caring adult, dynamic training to boost positive youth development knowledge and skills in order to support a vibrant 4-H club or Clover Kids group, and an opportunity to meet and network with other volunteers. The interactive training includes an agenda loaded with knowledge, skills, and tools needed to enhance a volunteer’s work with 4-H youth. There will be age appropriate breakout sessions specific for 4-H Clubs and Clover Kids groups to provide more targeted skill building for volunteers working with those specific age groups. Volunteers will receive a binder of resources to prepare them for working with their club or group.

Training will be held in southeast Iowa on Saturday, March 29, 2014 at the Scott County Extension Office in Bettendorf 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. There are numerous trainings throughout the state; volunteers are able to attend any of the locations. To register, go to www.extension.iastate.edu/4h/volunteertraining or call your local county office. Registration is due by March 24th for the March 29th session. The training will include a binder of resources and lunch. There is no fee to attend.

For more information on how to volunteer with 4-H in your county please contact your local Iowa State University Extension and Outreach office at 563-359-7577. For more information on Leader’s Training in southeast Iowa, please contact Daleta Thurness, Youth Program Specialist, 563-263-5701 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

-30-

 
<< Start < Prev 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Next > End >>

Page 12 of 162