Agribusiness
Iowa Farm Bureau Webinar to Discuss 2012 U.S. and Farm Economic Outlook PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Agribusiness
Written by Heather Lilienthal   
Tuesday, 27 December 2011 11:21

WEST DES MOINES, IOWA – Dec. 22, 2011 – While the agricultural industry is helping to strengthen the state’s overall economy, it’s important for Iowa farmers to carefully manage risk and understand economic challenges and opportunities, says the Iowa Farm Bureau Federation (IFBF). IFBF will offer a 2012 U.S. and farm economic outlook webinar on Tuesday, Jan. 17, at noon (CST).

The webinar will feature Robert Dieli, president of RDLB, Inc., and Paul Prentice, president of Farm Sector Economics. They will discuss the current volatility in agriculture and offer insight in opportunities and potential challenges.

Participants can access the free webinar at www.iowafarmbureau.com and look for the link on the main rotating banner. Registration is encouraged. Participants can also log in as guests on the day of the webinar.

For more information, contact Ed Kordick, Iowa Farm Bureau commodity services manager, at 515-225-5433.

-30-

 
Global Population Continues to Increase—Are U.S. Farmers Ready? PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Agribusiness
Written by United Soybean Board   
Friday, 23 December 2011 16:04
Soybean Checkoff-Funded Initiatives Support Food Production for the Future

ST. LOUIS (December 20, 2011) – More than seven billion people inhabit planet Earth, and about two billion more will join within 40 years, according to the United Nations Population Division. While many decision makers express concern about sustaining the population, often they forget to ask an important Question: Are U.S. farmers ready to produce the food needed to feed the growing population?

The United Soybean Board (USB) and soybean checkoff has responded with a resounding ‘yes,’ by funding soybean production research designed to help U.S. farmers grow as much as possible with as few resources needed.

“Soybean farmers must stay in tune with what is going on in the United States in order to stay ahead of any problems, such as the growing population,” said Jason Bean, a soybean farmer from Holcomb, Mo., and USB director. “Finding ways to figure out how to get everything out of our soybeans in order to have the best yield is crucial for success.”

In order to stay ahead of the curve, much of the research USB funds focuses on creating new U.S. soybean varieties more resistant to the pressures from pests and diseases that decrease yield. “Every year, we do a major production research project in each region that allows us to figure out the No. 1 yield robber,” says Bean. “Whether it is finding out how to resist pests, like aphids, stink bugs or soybean cyst nematodes, or determining drought tolerance, checkoff-funded research is intended to locate the problem, and then is shared with farmers across the United States.”

To help get this research into farmers’ hands, USB has established a program to help state soybean checkoff boards, land-grant universities and local extension service staff share checkoff-funded research results with those who need it most. To date, twelve states participate in the program.

But informing U.S. soybean farmers is only one part of the equation. Making sure consumers are informed about the process is important too, says Bean. 

USB is made up of 69 farmer-directors who oversee the investments of the soybean checkoff on behalf of all U.S. soybean farmers. Checkoff funds are invested in the areas of animal utilization, human utilization, industrial utilization, industry relations, market access and supply. As stipulated in the Soybean Promotion, Research and Consumer Information Act, USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service has oversight responsibilities for USB and the soybean checkoff.

For more information on the United Soybean Board, visit www.unitedsoybean.org
Visit us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/UnitedSoybeanBoard
Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/unitedsoy
View our YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/user/UnitedSoybeanBoard

###

 
Iowa’s Jim Stillman Elected to Help Lead Soybean Checkoff PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Agribusiness
Written by Erin Hamm   
Tuesday, 20 December 2011 15:52

United Soybean Board Leaders Committed to Moving U.S. Soy Industry Forward in 2012

ST. LOUIS (December 16, 2011) – The United Soybean Board (USB) and soybean checkoff prepare to head into the new year with a new farmer-led executive committee, electing Jim Stillman, a checkoff farmer-leader from Emmetsburg, Iowa, as vice chair. Stillman, along with the 68 other volunteer farmer-directors, will focus on implementing specific, new strategic objectives outlined in the checkoff’s Long-Range Strategic Plan.

They include directing soybean checkoff dollars to improve U.S. soybean meal and oil, helping ensure U.S. soybean farmers have the freedom and adequate transportation infrastructure to operate and meeting the needs customers of U.S. soy here at home and abroad. In addition, USB made supporting the biggest domestic user of soy – U.S. poultry, livestock and fish farmers – its top priority.

“These issues are critical to the U.S. soy industry,” Stillman said after his election. “I’m honored to help lead the soybean checkoff as it focuses on these issues and others that help maximize profit opportunities for all U.S. soybean farmers.”

Stillman has been a checkoff farmer-leader since 2005, most recently serving two terms as USB treasurer.

Other soybean farmer-leaders elected to the 2012 USB executive committee include:

•             Vanessa Kummer, Colfax, N.D., Chair

•             Jim Call, Madison, Minn., Secretary

•             Bob Haselwood, Berryton, Kan., Treasurer

•             Lewis Bainbridge, Ethan, S.D., Domestic Marketing Chair

•             Russ Carpenter, Trumansburg, N.Y., New Uses Chair

•             Sharon Covert, Tiskilwa, Ill., International Marketing Chair

•             Jim Schriver, Montpelier, Ind., Production Chair

•             Jimmy Sneed, Hernando, Miss., Communications Chair

•             Rick Stern, Cream Ridge, N.J, Audit & Evaluation Chair

USB is made up of 69 farmer-directors who oversee the investments of the soybean checkoff on behalf of all U.S. soybean farmers. Checkoff funds are invested in the areas of animal utilization, human utilization, industrial utilization, industry relations, market access and supply. As stipulated in the Soybean Promotion, Research and Consumer Information Act, USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service has oversight responsibilities for USB and the soybean checkoff.

For more information on the United Soybean Board, visit us at www.UnitedSoybean.org

Visit us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/UnitedSoybeanBoard

Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/unitedsoy

View our YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/user/UnitedSoybeanBoard

 

###

 
Taking the Challenge, Changing the Game PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Agribusiness
Written by United Soybean Board   
Monday, 19 December 2011 16:09
EDITORIAL: Taking the Challenge, Changing the Game
By John Motter, United Soybean Board Farmer-Director

Like most industries, farming constantly evolves. And just like business owners factor different variables into their profitability, farmers must weigh each opportunity and consider how it would benefit our operations. 

Seed choice always plays a major factor in my decisions on the farm, but how often do we consider where the crops from those varieties end up? Demand for soy’s two processed components, protein and oil, plays the major role in the price paid per bushel. In the past, protein drove the cost of soybeans through meal for the poultry and livestock industries. Today, oil continues to gain its share of the price paid per bushel and remains an important factor in end-use markets.

A new soybean trait now being introduced in soybean seed varieties addresses improving soybean oil and making it more desirable to our No. 1 soybean oil customer: the food industry. This trait, known as high-oleic soy, helps meet consumer needs while driving demand for U.S. soy. It addresses long-term demand for healthier edible oils and positions soy competitively with other oils.

In recent years, soybean farmers have lost considerable oil demand to competitive oils. High-oleic soybeans provide the opportunity for me and other U.S. soybean farmers to reclaim that market share and positively impact our profit potential. In fact, this oil could help us recapture 3.8 million pounds of lost soybean-oil demand. That’s the oil from approximately 341 million bushels of soybeans

We must have end-use markets, but, as farmers, we also need our soybeans to perform so we have something to sell. The varieties featuring this trait should not lower your expectations in the field. Seed companies plan to offer the high-oleic trait in soybean varieties that span several maturity groups and offer a range of agronomic packages.

The high-oleic trait followed an extensive research timeline before commercialization. As a farmer who grew high-oleic soybean varieties this year, I saw that research pay off firsthand. The high-oleic soybeans performed right at my farm’s average, a victory for such a new trait.

As this trait becomes available in your area and with your seed brand, I encourage you to take the challenge and help meet our customers’ demands. We all need to step up and help change the game for U.S. soybean production.

John Motter is a soybean farmer from Jenera, Ohio, and serves as a director for the United Soybean Board and soybean checkoff.

For more information on the United Soybean Board, visit www.unitedsoybean.org
Visit us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/UnitedSoybeanBoard
Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/unitedsoy
View our YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/user/UnitedSoybeanBoard

###

 
FARM BUREAU MEMBERS ANNOUNCED AWARD WINNERS AT 93rd ANNUAL MEETING PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Agribusiness
Written by Heather Lilienthal   
Monday, 19 December 2011 13:06

WEST DES MOINES, IOWA – Dec. 9, 2011 – More than 1,000 Iowa Farm Bureau Federation members from across the state gathered at the Polk County Convention Center in Des Moines this week to recognize achievements in agriculture, explore their role in producing food for a hungry world and discuss the 2012 Farm Bill during the organization’s 93rd annual meeting.

A number of farmers were recognized for their accomplishments on their operations and within their communities and industry. Distinguished Service to Agriculture awards were given to central Iowa cattle and grain farmers Bill and Nancy Couser, agricultural engineer Stewart Melvin and recently-retired legislator and farmer Dolores Mertz. (Photos of each award winner can be found at www.flickr.com/photos/iowafarmbureau/sets/72157628293522923/.)

Young farmers Justin and Jennifer Dammann, who raise cattle, corn, soybeans, alfalfa and rye on their Century Farm near Essex, won the IFBF Young Farmer Achievement Award and were recognized for their entrepreneurial spirit and dedication to Farm Bureau and their community. (www.flickr.com/photos/iowafarmbureau/6482190819/in/set-72157628293558591.)

Jamie Busch-Upah, a farmer from Tama County, won the Young Farmer Discussion Meet contest. The discussion meet encourages dialogue about issues and challenges that affect agriculture.  It tests young farmers’ knowledge of ag-related issues and their ability to express their opinions. (www.flickr.com/photos/iowafarmbureau/sets/72157628293536367/.)

The Dammanns and Busch-Upah will compete in these contests at the national level next month during the American Farm Bureau annual meeting.

Keynote speaker Walter Bond, a former NBA player, offered a “slam dunk” presentation; encouraging farmers to reach out beyond their comfort zones to understand their customers and how others perceive them and their work.  “You have success right now, but don’t you dare rest of your laurels. Don’t you dare relax,” he said. “You’ve had a great year, but your job is to get bigger, stronger and faster.”

-30-

 
<< Start < Prev 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 Next > End >>

Page 129 of 162