Agribusiness
Ultimate Show Gets Ultimate Roundup PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Agribusiness
Written by Dana Morgan   
Tuesday, 13 December 2011 09:47

For the first time, the editors of Farm Progress have pulled together all of their reporting on new products exhibited at the 2011 Farm Progress Show.

DECATUR, ILL., (12/08/2011) - The challenge of covering the 90-plus-acre exhibit field of the nation's largest outdoor farm show with more than 500 displays is no easy task. For the first time, the editors of Farm Progress have pulled together a comprehensive look at many new products they found during the 2011 Farm Progress Show.

Editors’ Picks - 100 New Ag Products
With more than 100 products included in the new Farm Progress white paper, "What's New From the Farm Progress Show - 2011 New Products White Paper," the compilation gives you a chance to download and view plenty of new technology. The report is free and available on www.FarmProgressDaily.com.

"We've been putting a team of editors 'on the ground' to cover the show for more than a decade, and every year we're astounded by what we turn up," says Willie Vogt, editorial director, Farm Progress. "In this first-ever edition, farmers can review those products, and have interactive access to company websites and phone numbers if they're ready to buy."

Learn About the Latest Ag Technology
Whether you're looking for information from major company introductions, or dozens of new tools and technologies from specialty and shortline companies, you'll find it in this new report. It's a concise, handy review for producers who visited the show as well.

"The white paper is an efficient, and effective, way to deliver higher-end, in-depth content for our readers," says Jeff Lapin, president, Farm Progress. "It's a service we believe our readers will do more to take advantage of as our library expands."

To download this FREE white paper, go to www.FarmProgressDaily.com and click the link to "What's New From the Farm Progress Show - 2011 New Products White Paper" located at the top right of the site under the "Free Reports" heading. After a very short sign-in, you'll get an e-mail link to the information-packed document. It's that simple.

Additional White Papers
Two additional high-interest white papers are also posted on www.FarmProgressDaily.com and more are in development for the site. "We're producing a range of new white papers in the next year covering a wide range of topics. Already, we're giving farmers an in-depth look at key issues with vertical tillage and with corn production," Vogt said. "And you'll see more covering everything from wind power to balers to technology issues."

 
New Farmer Leadership Takes Soybean Checkoff into the Future PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Agribusiness
Written by United Soybean Board   
Monday, 12 December 2011 16:08
anessa Kummer Elected to Lead United Soybean Board

ST. LOUIS (Dec. 6, 2011) – The national soybean checkoff just wrapped up its first 20 years, but the work doesn’t end there. As the United Soybean Board (USB) launches into the next 20 years, new U.S. soybean farmer-leaders take the reins and plan to continue the focus on creating profit opportunities for all U.S. soybean farmers.

USB farmer-directors elected Vanessa Kummer (Koo-mer) as chairperson on Dec. 6, during the checkoff’s annual meeting. The Colfax, N.D., soybean farmer will have a busy agenda leading the soybean checkoff’s implementation of a new strategic plan. Kummer looks at addressing recommendations from a farmer-driven assessment of USB and help lead the U.S. soybean industry. She will continue to shepherd the checkoff as it looks to increase soybean farmers’ profitability in an ever-evolving industry.

“It is our vision to make U.S. soybeans the leader in the global oilseed industry,” says Kummer. “We plan to create and maintain partnerships to keep U.S. soybean farmers profitable.”  Kummer is the first woman elected to chair the national soybean checkoff.

The team set to lead USB and help the soybean checkoff meet global customer demands with Kummer includes the following officers:

  • Jim Stillman, Emmetsburg, Iowa as Vice Chair;
  • Jim Call, Madison, Minn., as Secretary;
  • Bob Haselwood, Berryton, Kan., as Treasurer;
  • Lewis Bainbridge, Ethan, S.D.
  • Russ Carpenter, Trumansburg, N. Y.
  • Sharon Covert, Tiskilwa, Ill.
  • Jim Schriver, Montpelier, Ind.
  • Jimmy Sneed, Hernando, Miss.
  • Rick Stern, Cream Ridge, N.J.

Marc Curtis, a soybean farmer from Leland, Miss., will continue to serve on the leadership team as past chair.

“We have a great direction and a good team to make things happen,” adds Kummer. “We’re excited to help direct action that will increase soy’s value for all U.S. soybean farmers.”

In 2012, the soybean checkoff plans to focus on specific, new strategic objectives. They include directing soybean checkoff dollars to improve U.S. soybean meal and oil, helping ensure U.S. soybean farmers have the freedom and adequate transportation infrastructure to operate and meeting the needs customers of U.S. soy here at home and abroad. In addition, USB made supporting the biggest domestic user of soy, U.S. poultry, livestock and fish farmers, its top priority.

USB is made up of 69 farmer-directors who oversee the investments of the soybean checkoff on behalf of all U.S. soybean farmers. Checkoff funds are invested in the areas of animal utilization, human utilization, industrial utilization, industry relations, market access and supply. As stipulated in the Soybean Promotion, Research and Consumer Information Act, USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service has oversight responsibilities for USB and the soybean checkoff.

For more information on the United Soybean Board, visit www.unitedsoybean.org
Visit us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/UnitedSoybeanBoard
Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/unitedsoy
View our YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/user/UnitedSoybeanBoard

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U.S. Soybean Farmers Mark 20 Years of Checkoff Work PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Agribusiness
Written by United Soybean Board   
Monday, 12 December 2011 10:03
United Soybean Board Sets Sights on Next 20 Years at December Annual Meeting

ST. LOUIS (December 1, 2011) – U.S. soybean farmers aren’t spending much time recognizing the first 20 years of the United Soybean Board (USB) and the national soybean checkoff. They’re too busy planning for the next 20 years.

As the national checkoff’s 20th anniversary passes, the board will meet Dec. 6-7 in St. Louis to set its sights on making sure the checkoff reaches its goals and helps maximize U.S. soybean farmers’ profit opportunities in the future.

The 69 farmer-leaders who serve on USB will observe the national checkoff’s 20th anniversary during their December meeting; they will also continue their focus on the checkoff’s new Long Range Strategic Plan.

“Now is no time to sit on our laurels and focus only on the past,” says USB Chairman Marc Curtis, a soybean farmer from Leland, Miss., whose successor will be elected at the December meeting. “Instead, we are focused on meeting our strategic objectives aimed at supporting our fellow U.S. soybean farmers’ profitability in the decades to come.”

Those four strategic objectives involve increasing the value of U.S. soybean meal and oil; ensuring U.S. soybean farmers have the freedom and transportation infrastructure to operate; and renewing the board’s focus on meeting customer needs.

Meeting those objectives will be nothing new for the soybean checkoff, which has accomplished much on behalf of U.S. soybean farmers in the last two decades. During that time, USB has helped grow global demand for U.S. soy, helped create and grow the use of biodiesel and Bioheat® markets, funded many new industrial uses for U.S. soy, and helped fund the research that eventually achieved the sequencing of the soybean genome.

Since the national checkoff’s inception in 1991, when U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan appointed 63 soybean farmers from 30 states and two regions to serve as the checkoff’s first farmer-directors, U.S. soybean demand has grown by greater than 140 percent around the world, more than any other U.S. major crop. Since 2010, as agriculture leads all U.S. economic sectors in the balance of trade, U.S. soy has topped the list in agriculture.

“We are a global economy; there are other competitors around the world, not only for our soybeans but for other oilseeds that would like to have some of the market we currently enjoy,” said Sandy Ludeman, the soybean checkoff’s founding chairman and soybean farmer from Tracy, Minn. “So if we want to make sure we have a good share of the market for U.S. grown soybeans, we very much need the checkoff to invest farmer dollars in the research and promotion that will help get us there,” Ludeman said.

USB is made up of 69 farmer-directors who oversee the investments of the soybean checkoff on behalf of all U.S. soybean farmers. Checkoff funds are invested in the areas of animal utilization, human utilization, industrial utilization, industry relations, market access and supply. As stipulated in the Soybean Promotion, Research and Consumer Information Act, USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service has oversight responsibilities for USB and the soybean checkoff.

For more information on the United Soybean Board, visit www.unitedsoybean.org
Visit us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/UnitedSoybeanBoard
Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/unitedsoy
View our YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/user/UnitedSoybeanBoard

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IOWA FARM BUREAU WEBINAR DISCUSSES LABOR REGULATIONS PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Agribusiness
Written by Heather Lilienthal   
Tuesday, 06 December 2011 12:34

Labor expert offers insight into regulations that can affect Iowa farms

WEST DES MOINES, IOWA – Nov 23, 2011 – Farmers are not only focused on what they raise on their farms, but who they hire to work for them, says the Iowa Farm Bureau Federation (IFBF).  As new laws and proposed regulations addressing labor continue to surface, IFBF is offering a webinar on Tuesday, Dec. 12, to help farmers navigate the latest labor regulations.

The labor regulations webinar will be held from 1-2 p.m. and can be accessed, for free, at www.iowafarmbureau.com.  The webinar features Craig Anderson, manager of the Ag Labor and Safety Services division of the Michigan Farm Bureau.

“Labor is an important resource for agriculture and this webinar is designed to keep Iowa farmers up-to-date on existing, new and proposed regulations and discuss their implications,” said Ed Kordick, IFBF commodity services manager.  “Farmers need to establish labor management practices that are socially responsible, comply with regulations and promote safety on the job. This seminar can help them identify areas for improvement and be successful employers.”

If you have questions on the webinar, contact Kordick at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or 515-225-5433. The seminar will be recorded and available on the IFBF website, www.iowafarmbureau.com, starting the following day, for members to view the information on their farm/home computer. In addition, members can also access the recording of the 2011 Iowa Farm Tax Seminar at the website.

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7 Billion Reasons to Give Thanks for American Agriculture PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Agribusiness
Written by Sen Chuck Grassley   
Tuesday, 22 November 2011 16:11

By U.S. Senator Chuck Grassley

From Washington, we hear a lot of big numbers rolling off the tongues of politicians, policy wonks and pundits. Let’s talk turkey. Trimming the fat and finding slices of savings is increasingly difficult. Ideological and political beliefs run bone-deep for many lawmakers who come to the table representing opposing points of view from different geographic regions and cross-sections of the U.S. population.

Yet there is a common thread that seems to connect the American electorate, whether we align ourselves as urban or rural; young or old; liberal or conservative. People are fed up with the way Washington works.

Years of unrestrained government spending have blown the lid off of fiscal discipline, putting America’s long-term prosperity at risk. Overpromising, over-regulating and overreaching will not help America’s entrepreneurs, big thinkers, farmers, small business owners and other leaders out-innovate, out-educate and out-build our competition in the 21st century.

In the U.S. Senate, I work to do right by Iowans who have entrusted me to represent the interests of our state in Washington. I keep a close eye on the three branches of the federal government to make sure no one in the bureaucracy thumbs a nose at the rule of law or breaks the trust of the taxpaying public.

Family farmers have a sun-up to sun-down work ethic borne out of necessity to get the job done. Conscientious stewardship of one’s financial and natural resources are basic to a farm’s long-term prosperity and requires sacrifice and commitment. Risk is a 24-hour occupational hazard. Consider on-the-job work safety, natural disasters, swings in commodity prices and farm exports dependent upon international trade agreements. Farmers shoulder a burden of risk that’s largely out of their control.

In good times and in bad, farmers weather the highs and lows of cyclical markets and the whims of Mother Nature.

Putting affordable food on the table is important now more than ever. The world’s population reached seven billion this fall. In times of economic uncertainty and public discontent around the world, food security is a non-negotiable standard of public policy. It’s a common thread that unites all of humanity, whether urban or rural; young or old; liberal or conservative.

As Washington works to help revive the U.S. economy, I’ll continue working for American agriculture.

That includes helping to make sure independent producers and beginning farmers have a level playing field to compete and capture a fair share of the consumer’s food dollar; adopting reasonable caps on farm program payments; and, breathing common sense into federal regulatory regimes, such as the EPA’s ridiculous effort to regulate farm dust.

During this season of Thanksgiving, Barbara and I salute the family farmers who have chosen a noble profession and way of life to earn a living. Thanks to their stewardship, America’s agricultural abundance is helping to feed, clothe and fuel a growing world population 365 days a year.

 
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