Business & Economy
Braley to Hold Budget Town Halls Across District PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Business & Economy
Written by Alexandra Krasov   
Tuesday, 19 April 2011 14:57

Invites Iowans to create own balanced budget, reduce deficit

Washington, DC – April 19, 2011 - Congressman Bruce Braley (IA-01) invites Iowans from across the first Congressional district to attend a series of budget and deficit reduction town halls the week of April 25th. The town halls will be fully interactive and attendants will be able to decide how to balance the budget and reduce the deficit.

“It’s long past due time for a serious, responsible conversation about our fiscal future – and that’s why I want to bring the budget discussion directly to my constituents,” said Rep. Braley. “These town halls will give Iowans an opportunity to see first-hand how the budget process works in Congress. Together, we can find the best ways to balance the budget and reduce our deficit. I look forward to hearing from my constituents and discussing these important issues with them.”  

***The town halls will be open to all press.***

Attendants can RSVP on Rep. Braley’s website at: http://go.usa.gov/TQa

Rep. Braley will hold four town halls over the week of April 25th:

Monday April 25th - Quad Cities
The Rogalski Center
St. Ambrose University Campus
Corner of Ripley and Lombard Streets
Davenport, IA 52803
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Tuesday April 26th - Cedar Valley
Commons Ballroom
University of Northern Iowa
1224 West 23rd Street
Cedar Falls, IA 50614
4:30 PM - 6:30 PM

Wednesday April 27th - Dubuque
Grand River Center
500 Bell Street
Dubuque, IA 52001
9:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Wednesday April 27th - Fayette
Student Center Ballroom
Upper Iowa University Campus
East side of Washington Street in the middle of campus
Fayette, IA 52142
2:00 PM - 4:00 PM


###

 
Budget Showdown Previews Nation’s Fiscal Cliffhanger PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Business & Economy
Written by Sen Chuck Grassley   
Monday, 18 April 2011 13:16

Friday, April 15, 2011

As hundreds of millions of Americans zeroed in on highly publicized negotiations in Washington to avert a shutdown of the federal government, tens of millions of people from around the world were riveted by a live video stream coming out of Decorah, Iowa. Nestled 80 feet above ground in a cottonwood tree, three eaglets fascinated their online audience by hatching one-by-one under their parent’s 24-hour supervision.

The close-up has fascinated classrooms of students and households across the country, enriching curriculum and showcasing the uncommon stateliness and regal beauty of America’s national emblem.

While the hatchlings feasted on trout, carp and carrion brought to the nest by their parents in northeast Iowa, the budget debate ramped up in Washington.

How did Washington reach the brink in the first place? The Democratic-controlled Congress failed last year to pass a budget by the September 30 deadline. In the meantime, the federal government had been kept open with seven temporary spending bills.

So when the 112th Congress opened for business in January, it needed to hammer out a budget for the current fiscal year already underway before starting work on a budget for 2012.

After a week of showdowns, even a veto threat, that brought unnecessary uncertainty to hundreds of thousands of Americans, including military families and federal workers, the leadership in the House of Representatives and U.S. Senate reached a last-minute agreement with the White House. It will cut nearly $39 billion from the federal budget that will finance the federal government for the remainder of the fiscal year.

Although a relatively small victory for taxpayers considering the size of the deficit, the spending reduction represents a positive shift in the debate over the cost and size of the federal government. It’s a victory for taxpayers because it established a new bottom line for future budget negotiations:  Washington needs to champion policies that grow the economy and create jobs, not defend ways that grow the government.

Although a resolution was achieved, the debate sets the stage for what is sure to be even more intense debate in the months ahead.

That’s because the federal government still faces an unprecedented $14 trillion national debt. By mid-May, the United States will reach its legal debt ceiling.

For too long, the federal budget has ridden the rails of Washington’s spending spree, picking up even more speed over the last two years with federal bailouts, stimulus handouts and new entitlement spending that have ratcheted up deficit spending and dug a bigger hole for American taxpayers to fill.

It’s time for Washington to come clean with the American public. The federal government cannot borrow-and-spend our way to prosperity. The growing national debt poses serious risk to the long-term economic health of the United States.  It puts a heavy burden on taxpayers who will have less take-home pay to save, spend and invest if they have to send more money to Washington.

The recent budget stalemate is actually overshadowed by the much graver fiscal cliffhanger looming on the horizon. The national debt and unsustainable entitlements pose serious challenges to America’s long-term prosperity.

Let’s hope Washington gets serious about shutting down deficits and reforming entitlement spending. By doing so, Congress and the White House will go a long ways towards strengthening the U.S. economy and America’s safety nets for retirees and the disabled.

Lawmakers and the President might find inspiration from the eagles nesting in Decorah. For 235 years, America has served as a beacon of hope and opportunity and for freedom and prosperity. Chosen by America’s Founders to symbolize freedom, strength and longevity, the eagle graces the Seal of the United States. With widespread wings, the eagle carries a scroll in its beak inscribed with “E Pluribus Unum.” The Latin phrase translates “Out of Many, One.”

The president and 435 members of Congress collectively represent many different constituencies across the ideological, political, geographic and demographic spectrum. Although representing many, we all can work to make America an even better place for posterity. If we continue to live beyond our means, we’ll push future generations over a fiscal cliff of no return. That’s why Washington must clamp down on new spending and shrink the national debt.

 
Capitol Comments - Week 14 in the Iowa Senate PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Business & Economy
Written by Sen. Shawn Hamerlinck   
Friday, 15 April 2011 14:13

All bills must pass the House and Senate with the exact same language before it is sent to the governor.  Thus far, the House and Senate have passed separate versions on all budget bills except two.  The two which made it through to the Governor’s desk were vetoed.  Think of running bills through the Legislature like running the Bix 7; the House has reached the finish line but can’t cross until it joins hands with the Senate and receives permission from the Governor.  In a scenario like this, joining hands and gaining permission to take the last step may be more difficult than running the previous seven miles.

The main issue in the Senate is making sure enough runners stay on the track to find the finish line.  Over the last two years when the Senate was divided at 32-18 with Democrats in control, Majority Leader Gronstal could move forward even when some members deviated.  This year with the Senate Democrats having a 26-24 majority, any one member has the same power as the Majority Leader.  If one person walks on any issue, 25 votes does not make a majority.  Delays in the Senate are not due to partisan politics.  In fact, it is the exact opposite.  Senate Republicans are more than willing to help Senate Democrats end this session as soon as Senate Democrats finalize what bills they want to run.

One issue that no politician can shy away from is the budget.  Picture the General Fund as a bucket which only so much money can flow into.  When the bucket overflows, money falls into the Cash Reserve Fund and when that bucket overflows money ends in the Economic Emergency Fund.  The real debate between the House and Senate right now is over how many items can be stuffed into the General Fund and whether or not some items should be paid out of the Economic Emergency Fund and Cash Reserve Funds.  At the core of this debate is whether or not additional ongoing expenditures for items like education should be funded out of one-time money from accounts like the Economic Emergency Fund.  Here is a bigger question, if we do this, how do you pay for emergencies when the Mississippi and Wapsi flood?

Throw redistricting into this marathon we’re running and let’s hope some don’t just walk off the track.  The redistricting plan, which passed the Senate on Thursday, immediately put thirty-one Senators up for re-election.  Attitudes and personalities change when politicians are thrown into the same district and are facing a new campaign season.  This is becoming the opposite of the “not in my back yard effect.”  Nearly everyone has shopped at least one time at Wal-Mart, yet not very many people want Wal-Mart in their backyard.  In this scenario politicians are asking themselves, “What do I get in my back yard?”  At the end of the day, there will be districts and a representative form of government and politicians should stop worrying.

Thank you for letting me represent you at the Capitol.

Shawn Hamerlinck
State Senate District 42

 
Braley to Hold Budget Town Halls Across District PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Business & Economy
Written by Alexandra Krasov   
Friday, 15 April 2011 14:07
Invites Iowans to create own balanced budget, reduce deficit


Washington, DC – Congressman Bruce Braley (IA-01) invites Iowans from across the first Congressional district to attend a series of budget and deficit reduction town halls the week of April 25th. The town halls will be fully interactive and attendants will be able to decide how to balance the budget and reduce the deficit.

“It’s long past due time for a serious, responsible conversation about our fiscal future – and that’s why I want to bring the budget discussion directly to my constituents,” said Rep. Braley. “These town halls will give Iowans an opportunity to see first-hand how the budget process works in Congress. Together, we can find the best ways to balance the budget and reduce our deficit. I look forward to hearing from my constituents and discussing these important issues with them.”  

***The town halls will be open to all press.***

Attendants can RSVP on Rep. Braley’s website at: http://go.usa.gov/TQa

Rep. Braley will hold four town halls over the week of April 25th:

Monday April 25th - Quad Cities
The Rogalski Center
St. Ambrose University Campus
Corner of Ripley and Lombard Street
Davenport, IA 52803
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Tuesday April 26th - Cedar Valley
Commons Ballroom
University of Northern Iowa
1224 West 23rd Street
Cedar Falls, IA 50614
4:30 PM - 6:30 PM

Wednesday April 27th - Dubuque
Grand River Center
500 Bell Street
Dubuque, IA 52001
9:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Wednesday April 27th - Fayette
Student Center Ballroom
Upper Iowa University Campus
East side of Washington Street in the middle of campus
Fayette, IA 52142
2:00 PM - 4:00 PM


###

 
Allegiant Schedules First Quarter 2011 Earnings Call PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Business & Economy
Written by Jordan McGee   
Tuesday, 12 April 2011 11:44

LAS VEGAS, April 11, 2011 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Allegiant Travel Company (Nasdaq: ALGT) has scheduled its first quarter 2011 financial results conference call on April 28, 2011, at 4:30 p.m. (Eastern). A live broadcast of the conference call will be available through the company's Investor Relations website homepage at http://ir.allegiant.com. The webcast will be also be archived on the "Events & Presentations" section of the site.

When:     Thursday, April 28, 2011, at 4:30 p.m. EST

Who:       Maurice J. Gallagher, Jr., Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Andrew C. Levy, President 
Scott Sheldon, Chief Financial Officer
How:       Web Address: http://ir.allegiant.com

 
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