drought- watering guide PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Environment & Weather
Written by Michelle Campbell   
Monday, 23 July 2012 13:29
We are concerned about the health and wellbeing of plants as we drive around town so we put out this article for the public. Hopefully we can help save area trees and shrubs together.-Michelle Campbell, Horticulturist (563) 271-0381
THE GREEN THUMBERS GUIDE TO WATERING July 2012
During this period of drought, it is imperative that plants receive the proper amounts of water to survive. We have outlined below the proper watering techniques to follow.
NEW PLANTINGS: Including any new shrubs and perennials that were planted this year. Water three times per week (large leafed plants such as Hydrangea may need more, up to every other day if leaves are drooping). Certain perennials may need more frequent watering as well, depending on the amount of sun they are getting. When you water, using a water wand with a rain water head is going to give the best results. Do not use a pistol nozzle or just an open hose. This is very important. If you don’t have one, you will want to purchase one, they run from $15.00 to $30.00, Dramm offer the best quality. Recommended Water times: Shrubs- for each approx. 45 seconds X2. Perennials-for each approx. 20 seconds X2. Which means, to water a grouping of plants and then go back and water them a second time for the same length of time.
ANNUAL FLOWERS in containers: Water daily. Be sure to water enough so that water drains from the bottom of the container. Fertilize containers Bi-weekly with a good quality fertilizer.
ANNUAL FLOWERS in the ground: Water twice per week with a water wand, typically soaking each plant for 5 to 10 seconds in addition to soaking entire area. Again, water each plant and then go back and water each again for the same length of time.
NEWLY PLANTED TREES: Turn your water wand down to half pressure, so the water bubbles out instead of a flowing. Set the wand near the base of the tree and let it soak for approx. 10 to 15 minutes. If it was a large balled and burlap tree when planted, set the water wand on one side of the tree for 10 minutes and then move the wand to the other side of the tree for the same amount of time. I would recommend watering once per week.
ESTABLISHED PLANTS: There are a couple of ways to water established plants. You could purchase a soaker hose and wind it around your plants. Hook up your garden hose to the end of it and let the water run for approx. 2 – 3 hours. The other method would be to water using your water wand, turning the water on to half pressure so that the water bubbles out, set the wand near the base of the plant and let it set there for 10 to 30 minutes per plant, depending on the size. I would recommend water established plants once every two weeks.
ESTABLISHED TREES: Using your water wand, turn the pressure down to half, set the wand a couple feet from the base of the tree and let it soak for 30 minutes. Then move it to other side of the trunk and let it soak for another 30 minutes. Another option would be to set a sprinkler up to run underneath the tree and let it run until approx. 1” of water is applied (set a rain gauge in the area to measure the water). NOTE: it will take several hours to accumulate 1” of water. I would recommend watering trees once every three weeks.
LAWNS: Water your lawn using a sprinkler and a rain gauge to measure water. Ideally water each area of your lawn until you have measured 1” of water in your rain gauge (set a rain gauge in the area to measure the water).
NOTE: it will take several hours to accumulate 1” of water. I would recommend watering once a week.
VEGETABLE GARDENS: Water thoroughly once per week by either using a soaker hose in the garden or using a sprinkler and a rain gauge to measure the water. Apply until approx. ½” of water is measure in the rain gauge. You may also individually water using your water wand the same as “Newly Planted”.
THE GREEN THUMBERS (563) 323-4984

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