Education & Schools
BBB Warns Schools and Daycares of Scholastic Scam PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Education & Schools
Written by Better Business Bureau   
Thursday, 11 September 2014 15:55
Scholastic School Supply Scam Features False Invoices, 22 States
Des Moines, IA—(September 9, 2014) Better Business Bureau is alerting schools and daycares to a scam involving Scholastic School Supply. The tactics employed by the company are similar to the well-known “Yellow Pages Scam,” a business to business operation that surfaced in 2013, and bilked more than $14 million from small businesses and churches before being halted at the request of the Federal Trade Commission.
“This scam takes advantage of schools, daycares, and other educators, and the frenzy at the start of the school year,” says Chris Coleman, President & CEO of BBB Serving Greater Iowa, Quad Cities and Siouxland. “Administrators who are just trying to stay on top of bills will recognize the name and pay the invoice without knowing the books were never ordered. Sadly, this type of scam is all too familiar to us at BBB.”
Consumers reaching out to the BBB allege that the operation is sending false invoices to schools and school districts throughout the country in the amount of $647.50 for a bulk purchase of text books that were never requested or received. The only contact information available on the invoices is an email address which consumers report does not respond to messages, a phone number which routes to a series of voice mail boxes, and mail drop addresses in either Sewell, New Jersey or Las Vegas, Nevada. Although the entity lists addresses in New Jersey and Nevada on its invoicing, the BBB has been unable to locate any corporation filings, business licensing, or otherwise required business entity documentation for it in either state to substantiate a physical location.
As of September 5, 2014, BBB Serving Southern Nevada (which serves Scholastic School Supply’s headquarters) has received a total of 51 complaints from across the country, as well as 2,303 inquiries regarding this scam operation.
With numbers continuing to rise in increments of as many as 15 complaints a day, schools are urged to not pay the invoice, but instead to contact the Federal Trade Commission at (877) 382-4357 www.ftc.gov, the local Postal Inspectors, or Nevada State Bureau of Consumer Protection at (702) 486-3132 www.ag.nv.gov.
Consumers may also contact BBB Serving Greater Iowa, Quad Cities and Siouxland at 800-222-1600.

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ABOUT Better Business Bureau: For more than 100 years, Better Business Bureau has been helping people find businesses, brands and charities they can trust. In 2013, people turned to BBB more than 132 million times for BBB Business Reviews on more than 4.5 million businesses and Charity Reports on 11,000 charities, all available for free at bbb.org. BBB Serving Serving Greater Iowa, Quad Cities and Siouxland, founded in 1940 and is one of 112 local, independent BBBs across North America. You can reach us at 515-243-8137 or online at bbb.org/iowa.

 
Petitions for 2015 BHC trustee election available Sept. 16 PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Education & Schools
Written by Holly Smith   
Thursday, 11 September 2014 15:44

Nominating petitions and other election materials for the 2015 Black Hawk College Board of Trustees election may be picked up at the college beginning Tuesday, Sept. 16.

In April 2015, there will be three (3) six-year terms up for election.

Election materials are available in office of the chief financial officer in Building 1 at the college’s Quad-Cities Campus, 6600 34th Ave., Moline, and in the office of the vice president for East Campus, 26230 Black Hawk Road, Galva (five miles south of Kewanee).

The Black Hawk College district includes all or part of nine counties in west central Illinois, consisting of more than 280 individual precincts.

Nominating petitions may not be circulated until Tuesday, Sept. 23. Completed petitions may be filed beginning at 8 a.m. Monday, Dec. 15 through 5 p.m. Monday, Dec. 22 in the office of the chief financial officer at the Quad-Cities Campus.

For more information, call 309-796-5302.

 
CONCORDIA UNIVERSITY WISCONSIN RELEASES SPRING HONORS LIST PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Education & Schools
Written by Jeff Bandursky   
Thursday, 11 September 2014 14:57

Concordia, Wis. (September 8, 2014) - Concordia University Wisconsin officials have released the Spring Honors List for the 2013-2014 academic year. To be eligible for the honor, students must achieve a minimum 3.50 GPA.

Among the area students named to the list were Ian Wallace, a sophomore studying accounting from Davenport.

Founded in 1881, Concordia University Wisconsin, 12800 North Lake Shore Drive, Mequon, offers over 70 undergraduate majors and is affiliated with The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. The school is located on 200 acres of Lake Michigan shoreline, only 15 minutes north of downtown Milwaukee.

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CAMP COURAGEOUS HOSTS 26th ANNUAL BACK-TO-SCHOOL FESTIVAL PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Education & Schools
Written by Charlie Becker   
Thursday, 11 September 2014 14:26
MONTICELLO, IOWA – The 26th annual Back-to-School Festival is scheduled for Tuesday, September 16, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM. Special Education classes are invited to this free event sponsored by Camp Courageous and Variety-The Children's Charity. There will be games, prizes, train rides, bounce house, swimming, a helicopter landing and more. Face painters, a balloon artists and many mascots will be mingling with the crowd. A free lunch is provided.

Camp Courageous is a year- round recreational and respite care facility for individuals with disabilities. Camp served 211 campers during the summer of 1974 and now serves over 6500 campers a year.

For more information or to RSVP or volunteer please contact Jeanne
Muellerleile at jeanne@campcourageous.org or call 319-465-5916 ext. 2300.

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5 Ways to Change How Teachers Function in K-12 Classrooms PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Education & Schools
Written by Ginny Grimsley   
Thursday, 11 September 2014 14:19
Educational Researcher Says It Will Boost Learning
& Cut Costs

Less than half of high school graduates who took the SAT in 2013 were prepared for college, continuing a five-year trend.

Less than half – 44 percent -- who took the ACT had the reading skills necessary for college. That’s down from 53 percent in 2009. And nearly a third failed to meet standards in four areas: reading, English, science and math.

The failures have persisted despite years of new tests, new curricula and new demands on teachers, notes educational researcher and consultant Charles M. Reigeluth, author of “Reinventing Schools: It’s Time to Break the Mold,” (www.reigeluth.net).

“We continue to approach the same problems with the same sorts of solutions, despite the fact that they’re not working,” he says. “Instead, we need a fundamental shift in how we educate our children. Our public school system was designed to meet the needs of a long-ago era – the Industrial Age. It’s not working because we’re now in the Information Age.”

Teachers unfairly shoulder much of the blame for the lack of progress, he notes, but they’re hamstrung by roles and rules that don’t work for 21st century students.

“We need to change from teacher-centered education to learner-centered. In the Industrial Age paradigm, teachers are a judge and a perceived threat. In the Information Age, they should be guides and coaches who help students overcome obstacles,” says Reigeluth.

His multidimensional approach includes reducing bureaucracy in schools; encouraging students to teach each other with teacher supervision; having interns and other paraprofessionals, including retiree volunteers, assist with guiding student learning; and creating an “educational cooperative,” where a community’s adults can earn access to learning resources, advancing their own education, in exchange for helping students learn.

“The new paradigm can significantly reduce the cost of education while increasing the quality,” says Reigeluth, who outlines the five new roles teachers would have in this redesigned system.

•  Mentor … the same 20 to 30 students for several years, addressing all aspects of student development. Students and teachers would develop the deeper relationships that foster real caring on both sides. Mentors would help students prepare a personal learning plan for each project period, six to 12 weeks, including helping each student and his parents choose appropriate instructional goals, subject to standards set by the community, state and nation. Mentors would also help identify and support the best means for each student to achieve those goals.

•  Designer … of student work options, mostly projects or tasks, to engage students in the learning process. Open educational resources developed by teachers throughout the country and available to all educators for free via the Internet can alleviate much of the burden of the designer role.

•  Facilitator … of the learning process, which entails monitoring student progress, enhancing student motivation and coaching student performance.

•  Learner … the teacher is always learning with the students, about students, from and for the students. The teacher does not have all the answers, but the teacher helps students find answers. And the teacher is always learning more about how best to meet students’ needs. The new paradigm provides sufficient support for teacher learning.

•  Owner and manager … of the school. Like lawyers and accountants in a small firm, teachers would be partners who own their public school and make decisions about its operations, including budgeting and staffing. This model is already a success at the Minnesota New Country School and other EdVisions schools. This role elevates teachers to that of true professionals, rather than workers controlled by an all-powerful bureaucracy.

“These new roles offer empowerment to those who are most affected by our system, the student and the teacher, the latter of whom I suggest calling ‘guides’ to better reflect their new roles,” Reigeluth says. “The new roles better serve students in the age in which we live.”

About Charles M. Reigeluth

Charles M. Reigeluth is a distinguished educational researcher who focuses on paradigm change in education. He has a B.A. in economics from Harvard University, and a Ph.D. in instructional psychology from Brigham Young University. He was a professor at the Instructional Systems Technology Department at Indiana University, and is a former chairman of the department. His new book, “Reinventing Schools,” (www.reigeluth.net), advocates and chronicles a national paradigm change in K-12 education. He offers presentations and consulting on this topic.

 
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