Education & Schools
ISU COLL. OF HUMAN SCIENCES AWARDS PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Education & Schools
Written by TheLink Delivery Service   
Friday, 27 July 2012 07:46

Ames, Iowa - The Iowa State University College of Human Sciences and its academic departments offered over $800,000 in scholarships to students for the 2012-2013 academic year.

Local recipients include:

Stephanie Blaser, senior from Bettendorf, dietetics major and Assumption High School graduate and daughter of Mark and Nancy Blaser, receives the Helen A. Foster Scholarship, College of Human Sciences, and the Bonnie Glatz Scholarship in Food Science and Human Nutrition, Food Science and Human Nutrition.

Taylor Finney, senior from Bettendorf, apparel, merchandising, and design major and Bettendorf High School graduate, Sherril and Charles Finney, receives the Barbara and Alf Odegaard Scholarship, Apparel, Events, and Hospitality Management, and the Polly Baichly Fund Scholarship, College of Human Sciences

Elizabeth Fry, junior from Bettendorf, kinesiology and health major and Bettendorf High School graduate, daughter of Don and Kathy Fry, receives the Achievement Award and the CHS Honors Scholarship, College of Human Sciences,

Amanda Haffarnan, senior from Bettendorf, a nutritional science, genetics, and dietetics major and Bettendorf High School graduate, daughter of Robert and Wendy Haffarnan, receives the Letitia Jones Olson Scholarship and the Doris A. Adams Scholarship, Food Science and Human Nutrition.

Lindsay Hoffman, Bettendorf, MS candidate in diet and exercise, Pleasant Valley High School graduate receives the ISU Dietetic Alumni Scholarship and the Agnes Frances Carlin Scholarship, Food Science and Human Nutrition.

Benjamin Stecker, senior from Bettendorf, kinesiology and health major and Pleasant Valley High School graduate, son of Kim and Tim Stecker, receives the Achievement Award, College of Human Sciences,

Sara Turke, freshman from Bettendorf, apparel, merchandising, and design major and Pleasant Valley High School graduate, daughter of Stephen and Sally Turke, receives the Multicultural Award, College of Human Sciences

Kelly Wagner, senior from Bettendorf, dietetics major and Bettendorf High School graduate,  child of Mark and Kim Wagner, receives the International Experiences Scholarship and the Wayne H. and Gladys T. Scholtes Scholarship, College of Human Sciences, Elinor and Walter Fehr Family Fund Scholarship, Food Science and Human Nutrition.

Samantha Zust from Bettendorf, kinesiology and health major and Pleasant Valley High School graduate, daughter of Brad and Georgene Zust, receives the Dean's Scholarship, College of Human Sciences

Megan  Strong, freshman from Blue Grass, IA, dietetics major and West High School graduate, daughter of Tonya and Jason Strong, receives the Frances L. Harding Thiesfeld Scholarship, Food Science and Human Nutrition.

Hannah Adams, junior from Davenport, apparel, merchandising, and design major and graduate of Assumption High School, daughter of Don and Mary Adams receives the Elizabeth Beveridge Memorial Endowment Fund, College of Human Sciences.

Vanessa McNeal from Davenport, child, adult, and family services major and Central High School graduate, daughter of Deb and James McNeal, receives the Charlotte Gustafson Akins Home Economics Scholarship and the Jan Korslund Endowed Fund Scholarship, College of Human Sciences.

Sally Stringham, sophomore from Davenport, apparel, merchandising, and design major and graduate of Central High School, daughter of Jeff and Jill Stringham, receives the Barbara and Alf Odegaard Scholarship, Apparel, Events, and Hospitality Management.

Alexandra Howard, junior from Erie, IL, elementary education major and graduate of Erie High School, daughter of Matt and Patty Howard, receives the Maxine Dennis Brown Scholarship and the Iva and Stephen Inman Scholarship, College of Human Sciences.

 
Douglas Peters Interns in Houston Through Augustana Program PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Education & Schools
Written by Keri Rursch   
Thursday, 26 July 2012 15:37

ROCK ISLAND, IL (07/25/2012)(readMedia)-- Thirteen Augustana College students are currently completing internships in Houston, Texas, as part of the Texas Medical Center summer research internship program and will return at the beginning of August.

Douglas Peters, a senior from Port Byron, Ill. majoring in biology and neuroscience. Peters is interning in Houston at Baylor College of Medicine.

Now in its seventh year, the Augustana College internship program sends 10-15 students to the Texas Medical Center to serve as full-time interns in a variety of disciplines.

Dr. Heidi Storl, professor of philosophy and the director of the Texas Medical Center internships at Augustana, said "Students are chosen on the basis of their academic and personal merits."

This summer Augustana students are conducting research in biochemistry, psychology, public health, neuroscience, speech pathology, clinical ethics and human resources.

At Augustana, students choosing to complete an internship can receive financial support from the college thanks to a program launched in 2009 called Augie Choice. Focused on advancing student learning in the liberal arts, Augie Choice grants students in their junior year or beyond the opportunity to receive a one-time grant of $2,000 to offset the expenses of study abroad, an internship or research project. Augie Choice funding, which recently surpassed the $1.5-million milestone, is a visible symbol of the college's commitment to experiential learning as a way of preparing students to stand out among their peers.

About Augustana: Founded in 1860 and situated on a 115-acre campus near the Mississippi River, Augustana College is a private, liberal arts institution affiliated with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. The college enrolls 2,500 students from diverse geographic, social, ethnic and religious backgrounds and offers nearly 90 majors and related areas of study. Augustana employs 182 full-time faculty and has a student-faculty ratio of 12:1. Augustana continues to do what it has always done: challenge and prepare students for lives of leadership and service in our complex, ever-changing world.

 
BELLEVUE UNIV. SPRING GRADS LIST PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Education & Schools
Written by Jody   
Wednesday, 25 July 2012 13:38

(July 17, 2012 - Bellevue, Neb.) Following last month's commencement ceremony, Bellevue University proudly acknowledges the accomplishments of students who have earned degrees from January through June 2012 - 1,217 total, including 364 master's degrees and 853 bachelor's degrees. Graduates from 47 states represent the university's far-reaching impact.  Included among the graduates is Desirae Benge of Davenport with a  BS in International Security and Intelligence Studies.

Bellevue University is ranked second among all Nebraska institutions awarding the highest number of degrees and first among independent institutions, according to a report from the Nebraska Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary Education. The report cites that Bellevue University conferred 3,101 degrees in the 2010-2011 academic year, just behind the University of Nebraska - Lincoln, the state's largest academic institution. A private, non-profit institution, the University accounted for 55 percent of the increase in the number of degrees awarded by independent Nebraska institutions between 2000-01 and 2010-11.
Bellevue University offers more than 40 undergraduate degree programs and 17 graduate degree programs, with more programs in development. Those programs apply the University's unique active learning approach which allows students to attend class in a classroom or online, and meet with fellow students, discuss lessons with instructors, complete assignments and conduct research.

Bellevue University first offered online classes in November 1996 with a handful of students and six courses. Today, Bellevue University has more than 7,000 online students from all over the globe enrolled in more than 400 courses. Overall, more than 10,000 students now attend Bellevue University, making it the largest private university in Nebraska.

Bellevue University is a recognized national leader in providing post-secondary education opportunities for working adults. A private, non-profit institution, Bellevue University serves students at learning sites in three states, as well as worldwide through its award-winning online learning platform. Bellevue University is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. For more information, visit www.bellevue.edu.

 
KIRKWOOD COMM. COLLEGE SPRING GRADS LIST PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Education & Schools
Written by Kirkwood Community College   
Wednesday, 25 July 2012 13:36
(Cedar Rapids) Kirkwood Community College has announced the graduating class of 2011-2012. College faculty and administration joined friends and family in saluting the grads at commencement ceremonies at Prairie High School in Cedar Rapids, May 12.

from Bettendorf, IA:
  • Lenora Caruso, Liberal Arts, Associate of Arts
  • Kayla Corzette, Horse Science Technology, Associate of Applied Science

from Davenport, IA:
  • Kelli Hermiston, Business Administration, Associate of Arts
  • Kayla Pearson, Criminal Justice, Assocaite of Arts

 
50 Years Later, It’s Time to Accept School Prayer Ruling, Bible Scholar Says PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Education & Schools
Written by Ginny Grimsley   
Wednesday, 25 July 2012 13:07
Religious Training is the Job of Churches, Families

This summer marks 50 years since the Supreme Court ruling that effectively banned official prayers in public schools.

Ever since, wave after wave of proposed bills and amendments have sought to undo that ruling – or at least circumvent it.

And now, a former minister says prayer as government-sanctioned religious training never had a place in public school classrooms anyway.

Students are free to pray, individually, to their heart’s content, says former minister and NASA engineer Charlie Webster, author of Revitalizing Christianity (www.NewCenturyMinistries.com).

“If we as Christians are looking to the government to instill biblical values in our youngest citizens, then we’re in bad shape,” says Webster “Any time the church wants the state to teach morality and biblical matters, we’re definitely on the wrong path.”

After working as an executive for the space shuttle program, Webster earned a master’s degree in New Testament studies and taught that subject at the college level. He offers a list of reasons why official school prayer could never be a good source of religious training, including:

• Religious pluralism: America is a melting pot of nationalities, cultures, ideas and especially religions. “If we did allow the reading of sacred writings and public prayers in schools, we Christians want to think that they would always be compatible with our beliefs,” he says. “But in this country, government must give equal time to all religions within a community. It would be extremely difficult – if not impossible – for schools to provide meaningful training for all the religions represented by their students.”

• Differences in the specifics: Even among Christians, different groups have disparate beliefs, customs and viewpoints. Again, there are too many to expect schools to address each in a meaningful way.

• Prayer in school was largely ignored: I know because I was one of those who joined my classmates in ignoring them.

• Pew’s rising “unaffiliated” percentage: In addition to religious variety, the Pew Research Center shows that more than 16 percent of 35,000 polled Americans check the “unaffiliated” box. They include atheists, agnostics and those who believe in nothing in particular. Whether non-believers are teachers or students, Webster says, their presence would present a number of dilemmas if official school prayer were sanctioned.

“The truth is that it was not what happened in schools that affected the moral fiber of this country; it was what happened in homes and churches,” Webster says. “Today, comparatively few Christian homes devote a significant amount of time to religious training, and more and more the same is true of churches.”

Nowadays, many churches have resorted to gimmicks in an effort to draw in more followers, he says. These attempts do more to distract from the Christian message than promote it, Webster says, and government-based policies have much the same effect.

“Instead of trying to find a political solution, we need to do our own jobs,” he says. “If all Christians did that, any political decision would be of no significance at all. The world is starving for what we as Christians are supposed to have, but we’ve left it behind.”

About Charlie Webster

A former minister with bachelor’s and master’s degrees in biblical studies, Charlie Webster has taught the New Testament at the college level and has served as a minister. He is currently an engineer for NASA.

 
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