Education & Schools
Internship applications are due June 15 PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Education & Schools
Written by Grassley Press   
Wednesday, 09 May 2012 14:26

WASHINGTON — Applications for fall internships with Senator Chuck Grassley are due June 15.

 

Internships are available for college-age Iowans in Grassley offices in Washington, D.C., Cedar Rapids, Council Bluffs, Davenport, Des Moines, Sioux City and Waterloo.  The internships last from August 20 through December 15.

 

Senate interns assist staff members with administrative, legislative and communications work, including that of Grassley’s staff on the Senate Committee on the Judiciary, where he serves as Ranking Member.  A video about Grassley internships produced by last year’s summer interns can be seen here.

 

Grassley said he encourages young Iowans who are interested in learning more about government to apply.  “Working in a congressional office is a good way for college students and new graduates to learn more about the legislative branch of the federal government while gaining valuable work experience.  Internships in my offices are available to students in all areas of study,” he said.

 

Application forms are available on Grassley’s Senate website and in Grassley’s offices in Iowa. Due to security-related delays in postal mail delivery to U.S. Senate office buildings, internship applications should be emailed to intern_applications@grassley.senate.gov.  For additional information, send messages to intern_applications@grassley.senate.gov or call 202-224-3744.

 

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Nolan Hagge Graduates from Dordt College PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Education & Schools
Written by Sarah Vander Plaats   
Wednesday, 09 May 2012 12:42

SIOUX CENTER, IA (05/07/2012)(readMedia)-- Nolan Hagge of Princeton, Iowa, was among 321 Dordt College students awarded diplomas at the 2012 commencement ceremony held Friday, May 4, in the B.J. Haan Auditorium.

Hagge graduated with a Bachelor of Science - Engineering degree in engineering.

Among this year's graduates, 298 earned Baccalaureate degrees, 14 Associate of Arts degrees, and nine Master of Education degrees. The Baccalaureate degrees presented included Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science in Engineering, Bachelor of Science in Nursing, and Bachelor of Social Work degrees.

Outgoing college president Dr. Carl E. Zylstra gave the commencement address, "To The Hilt." Zylstra has been president of Dordt College since 1996, during which time the college has seen significant expansion in its facilities, endowment, and academic programs.

Dordt College in Sioux Center, Iowa, is a comprehensive Christian college rooted in the Reformed tradition. U.S. News & World Report, Forbes.com, Washington Monthly, and Princeton Review all list Dordt on their best colleges lists. Dordt is home to approximately 1,400 students. To learn more about Dordt College, visit www.dordt.edu.

 
Peter Wiese participated in Celebration of Learning PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Education & Schools
Written by Keri Rursch   
Wednesday, 09 May 2012 12:41

ROCK ISLAND, IL (05/07/2012)(readMedia)-- More than 75 Augustana students from all academic areas shared their advanced research projects on Saturday, May 5, at the Celebration of Learning. This on-campus research symposium annually gives students an opportunity to show off their academic accomplishments to their families and the Augustana community.

Among the students involved:

Peter Wiese, a senior from Davenport, Iowa, majoring in neuroscience and mathematics. Wiese presented two research projects. The first project was titled Using Conditioned Place Preference to Investigate Rewarding Stimuli in Young Chickens. Chickens are readily used as models in learning, as they demonstrate a variety of behaviors and the ability to learn at a young age. The objective of our study was to determine if young chicks would have a stronger preference for social contact with other chicks or a food reward. Our experiment tested this question by exploring whether chicks could be conditioned to prefer a certain environment over another based on a learned association. Using a conditioned place preference paradigm, chicks were exposed to a colored environment paired with one of two rewards. We predicted that chicks would spend more time in the environment paired with the stimulus that they found most rewarding. Our results showed that, in contrast to previous studies, the chicks preferred the red side of the box, independent of conditioning. We are currently considering reasons as to why this occurred.

The second project was titled Parametric Equations for Video Games. Danmaku, or "manic shooters," are a genre of video games that feature intricate patterns of bullets that the player must avoid. The motion of the bullets is determined by parametric equations of varying complexity. Using a game engine, we will explore how various patterns can be produced through the use of parametric equations using both polar or Cartesian coordinate systems.

Celebration participants presented their research through a poster display or an oral presentation. Many students expounded on the results of their Senior Inquiry, a multiple-term research project required for most academic programs. Other students shared honors capstone projects or student-faculty research findings. Because of the advanced level of research involved, most of the presenters are upperclass students.

Anne Earel and Stefanie Bluemle, Augustana reference librarians and the event's co-directors, said the Celebration of Learning provided an outlet for students to showcase their accomplishments.

Presentations topics varied greatly and included anthropology, biology, physics, geography, gender studies, theater and more.

 
Local students participated in Celebration of Learning PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Education & Schools
Written by Keri Rursch   
Wednesday, 09 May 2012 12:40

ROCK ISLAND, IL (05/07/2012)(readMedia)-- More than 75 Augustana students from all academic areas shared their advanced research projects on Saturday, May 5, at the Celebration of Learning. This on-campus research symposium annually gives students an opportunity to show off their academic accomplishments to their families and the Augustana community.

Among the students involved:

Alannah Golden, a junior from Davenport, Iowa, majoring in elementary education. The research was titled Expanding the Boundaries of Teacher Candidates in General Education: An Immersion Experience. Elementary education and communication sciences and disorders majors worked together to gather research for appropriate classroom accommodations when teaching exceptional children. Research was gathered during an immersion experience at The Florida School for the Deaf and Blind. Students researched literacy, technology, and a variety of accommodations as they worked with students with special needs within the school. The two majors worked together in order to effectively research ways to better meet the needs of exceptional children.

Manisha Kumar, a junior from Davenport, Iowa, majoring in biology and pre-medicine. The research was titled Characterizing the Cold-Conditioning Response in a Vertebrate Ectotherm. Ectothermic animals rely on seasonal increases in cold hardiness to survive a thermally variable environment, but a more rapid and supplementary subzero chilling may elicit a better response to a subsequent extreme chilling. In the present study, winter-acclimated Chrysemys picta (painted turtle) hatchlings were put in groups that were cold-conditioned to -3, -7, and -10.5°C. These turtles were later chilled to a more extreme temperature (-12.7°C) and monitored for recovery to determine the magnitude of the cold-conditioning response. To determine the effect of the cold-conditioning, levels of glucose, lactate, and urea were assessed in blood plasma, brain, and liver. Results showed that cold-conditioned turtles fared better, offering higher survival rates than those in the control condition. Turtles cold-conditioned to -3.5°C, however, had both the highest concentration of brain glucose and the highest survival rate. Concentration of brain glucose may be an important factor in determining survival of turtles exposed to cold.

Melissa McGreer, a senior from Illinois City, Ill., majoring in biology. The research was titled Mapping Infection Prevention Factors in Hospital Settings: A Clinical SI for the BA/BSN Dual Degree Program. Augustana pre-nursing students have the option of completing a dual degree BA/BSN including a clinical Senior Inquiry experience coordinated by the Trinity College of Nursing & Health Sciences in Rock Island, IL. After junior year as Augustana biology majors, these "nurse-scientists" take a summer nursing skills course at TCON&HS, followed by a 100+ hour clinical experience that allows them to explore a question bridging biology and nursing research. During summer 2011, I shadowed different departments at two hospitals in the Quad Cities. After a week or two learning from hospital staff, I proposed the idea that the precautions taken do vary from floor to floor in each hospital. I then created maps showing the interaction of these factors, sometimes referred to as a "web of causation" in epidemiology studies. Such maps can be used as guides for staff education to help healthcare workers see the gaps in their own practices.

Crystina Mayfield, a senior from Coal Valley, Ill., majoring in French, africana studies, and classics. The research was titled Creole Language in the Works of Patrick Chamoiseau. While Patrick Chamoiseau writes primarily in French, he uses a certain amount of Martinican creole language in his works to enhance the effect of his writing style. What exactly are the effects of the inclusion of creole language in a text when many readers will not be able to understand these phrases? What are the effects of including translations of the creole versus leaving it to stand on its own? What are the difficulties a creole writer faces when needing to use French to document a society which is firmly rooted in creole? These and other questions are the basis of this inquiry.

Celebration participants presented their research through a poster display or an oral presentation. Many students expounded on the results of their Senior Inquiry, a multiple-term research project required for most academic programs. Other students shared honors capstone projects or student-faculty research findings. Because of the advanced level of research involved, most of the presenters are upperclass students.

Anne Earel and Stefanie Bluemle, Augustana reference librarians and the event's co-directors, said the Celebration of Learning provided an outlet for students to showcase their accomplishments.

Presentations topics varied greatly and included anthropology, biology, physics, geography, gender studies, theater and more.

 
Some Lights ON Students at United Township High School are learning how to rebuild a 1979 Camaro with plans to race it PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Education & Schools
Written by M. McNeil   
Wednesday, 09 May 2012 12:12
(Rock Island, IL) A unique feature of the Lights ON program at the high school is  the ‘Racing Tech’ automotive program.  In this program, students are able to take advantage of the state of the art facilities UTHS offers in the fields of Auto Mechanics and Auto Body to gain experience beyond what is provided in those credit bearing courses. Math, Science and technical reading skills are all enhanced through this one-of-a kind program taught by instructors Scott Kave and Jamie King.

The media are invited to watch the students work on the Lights ON dragster this Tuesday, May 8th at 3:30 pm at the high school (address here).  On hand for interviews with be the students, teachers and administrators.

According to instructor, Jamie King, a mathematical connection is at the heart of the program.  “The students are learning the science of combustion engines and the performance of their project car.  While students are very comfortable making modifications to this vehicle, they are learning how to maximize results with each alteration.  They are in a constant search of correlations between equipment, installation techniques and power boosts.  The Dyno (complex system measuring engine power) and the drag strip will be the assessment tools for their hard work”.

WHO:  UT Auto Car Club
WHAT:  Building  a Lights ON drag car
WHEN:  Media preview Tuesdy, May 8, 2012  3:30 pm
WHERE:  United Township High School  Rock Island (check in at office)

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