Education & Schools
Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy Rock Island Region Field Office Ribbong Cutting to Feature Science Demos and Government Leaders PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Education & Schools
Written by Brenda Buschbacher   
Monday, 07 February 2011 16:55
Where:        Rock Island Center for Math and Science, 2101 16th Avenue, Rock Island, Illinois 61201
When:         Thursday, February 10, 2011
Time:           10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
What:          The Ceremonial Ribbon Cutting of IMSA’s New Rock Island Region  Field Office located at the Rock Island Center for Math and Science.  IMSA joins forces with educators from the Rock Island Region of Illinois to help students prepare for highly skilled careers as they discover the joys of learning mathematics and science.

The Ceremonial Ribbon Cutting of IMSA’s new Rock Island Region Field Office located at the Rock Island Center for Math and Science, featuring Rock Island Mayor Dennis Pauley and IMSA President Dr. Glenn W. “Max” McGee, will be held on Thursday, February 10, 2011 from 10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. at the Rock Island Center for Math and Science.  Other officials in attendance will be Dr. RuthAnn Tobey-Brown, principal of Rock Island Center for Math and Science and Dr. Michael Oberhaus, superintendent of Rock Island/Milan School District #41.

In addition to a welcome and comments from state and local dignitaries, the event will also feature a live science demonstration by the IMSA Kids Institute® (KI) conducted by IMSA students.  During the States of Matter:  Does it Matter? science demonstration, 25 students from the Rock Island Center for Math and Science  will see how solids, liquids and gases can change with temperature and through chemical reactions.  In addition,  IMSA on Wheels will perform Science is Shocking for 3-5th graders.

Through its new Rock Island Region Field Office, IMSA joins forces with educators from the Rock Island Region of Illinois to deliver professional development in mathematics and science instruction that focuses on inquiry and discovery; provide after school, weekend and summer mathematics and science programs for children; and address local needs by building and sustaining relationships with the Rock Island Region and coordinating mathematics and science programs with local organizations.

The internationally recognized Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy® (IMSA) develops creative, ethical leaders in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.  As a teaching and learning laboratory created by the State of Illinois, IMSA enrolls academically talented Illinois students (grades 10-12) in its advanced, residential college preparatory program, and it serves thousands of educators and students in Illinois and beyond through innovative instructional programs that foster imagination and inquiry. IMSA also advances education through research, groundbreaking ventures and strategic partnerships. (www.imsa.edu)
#-

 
Harkin: Pell Grant Payment Schedules for Next School Year Will Increase Access to College PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Education & Schools
Written by Sen. Tom Harkin   
Thursday, 03 February 2011 08:01
Maximum Annual Award Maintained at $5,500


WASHINGTON, D.C. – Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA) today applauded the Department of Education’s release of the new Pell Grant schedules as an important step towards improving access to college.  The schedules determine the Federal Pell Grant awards for the 2011-2012 Academic Year – July 1, 2011 through June 30, 2012 – for low-income college students.  The maximum Pell Grant award for this year will be $5,550.  As Chairman of the Labor, Health and Human Services and Education Appropriations Subcommittee, Harkin led the effort to fully fund the Pell Grant program in the Continuing Resolution that passed the Senate and was signed into law in December.  Additionally, as Chairman of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee, Harkin worked to eliminate billions of dollars in wasteful subsidies to banks and redirected that money to increase Pell Grants as part of the reconciliation package that was used to provide technical fixes to the health reform bill last March.

“In our efforts to attract and keep good jobs in America - and to stay competitive in the global economy - we must increase the number of students who attend college,” said Harkin.  “Currently, there are millions of bright, young people who want to attend school but simply can’t because of finances.  That is where the Pell Grant program provides much needed assistance and makes college more affordable for low-income students.  This is a small federal investment that repays itself many times over with a better paid tax base and a more educated work force.

“I am pleased that today the Department of Education has released its schedules so that schools and students can plan accordingly.  This is truly an important step in increasing access to college for all Americans.  Moving forward it is critical that we do all that we can in Congress continue to fund this program that is helping our economy and our future generations.”

The Federal Pell Grant Program provides need-based grants to over nine million low-income undergraduate and certain postbaccalaureate students to promote access to postsecondary education.  Students may use their grants at any one of approximately 5,400 participating postsecondary institutions.  Grant amounts are dependent on: the student's expected family contribution; the cost of attendance (as determined by the institution); the student's enrollment status (full-time or part-time); and whether the student attends for a full academic year or less.  To see the full Pell Grant schedule released today click here.

 
Environmental Justice Grants Now Available PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Education & Schools
Written by Benjamin Washburn   
Monday, 31 January 2011 15:36

(Kansas City, Kan., January 31, 2011) - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is accepting grant applications for $1.2 million in funding to support projects designed to research, educate, empower and enable communities to understand and address local health and environmental issues. Eligible applicants from non-profit, faith-based and tribal organizations working in the community of the proposed project are encouraged to apply.

These grants are available to Iowa, Kansas, Missouri and Nebraska organizations through the EPA Region 7 office in Kansas City, Kan.

Environmental Justice Small Grants funding is available for two categories of projects:

  • Forty grants of up to $25,000 each to support projects that address a community’s local environmental issues through collaborative partnerships, and;

  • Four grants of up to $50,000 each to gather better science on the environmental and health impacts of exposure to multiple sources of pollution in communities.

Environmental justice means the fair treatment and meaningful involvement of all people, regardless of race or income, in the environmental decision-making process. Environmental justice issues often involve multiple sources of contamination, like pollution from several industrial facilities within one neighborhood, environmental hazards at the workplace or home, or contamination resulting from the consumption of fish or other foods.

Environmental contamination can lead to costly health risks and can discourage investments and development in low-income, minority, and indigenous communities disproportionately impacted by pollution. Understanding the impacts of multiple environmental risks can help communities develop more effective solutions to their environmental and health concerns.

The Environmental Justice Small Grants (EJSG) Program is designed to help communities understand and address their exposure to multiple environmental harms and risks.

Applications must be postmarked by March 31, 2011.  For more information, including eligibility requirements, purposes, goals, and general procedures, please visit http://www.epa.gov/environmentaljustice/resources/publications/grants/ej-smgrants-rfp-2011.pdf

or contact EPA Region 7 toll-free at 1-800-223-0425. \

# # #

 
DISCOVER EARLY SCHOOL AT RIVERMONT COLLEGIATE! PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Education & Schools
Written by Brittany Marietta   
Monday, 31 January 2011 15:22

Crafts, stories, and new friends - it’s all happening at Rivermont Collegiate on Thursday mornings!  Children ages 2-4 (and an accompanying adult) are invited to join us for our free Young Scholars program, held the first Thursday of every month from 9:00-10:00 a.m. Youngsters join the current Rivermont preschool class for story time and crafts, while parents and families are invited to learn more about Rivermont, the Quad Cities’ only private, independent, nonsectarian college prep school for preschool through twelfth grade.  Join us to explore the Rivermont approach to learning, see our faculty in action, and enjoy oodles of fun with the preschool class!

The next Young Scholars event will be Thursday, February 3rd from 9:00-10:00 a.m. on the Rivermont campus, located at 1821 Sunset Drive, directly off 18th Street behind K&K Hardware in Bettendorf.  Young Scholars is free and open to the community.  Bring a friend!  We can’t wait to meet you!

For additional information about Rivermont Collegiate or the Young Scholars program, contact Cindy Murray at (563) 359-1366 ext. 302 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it and visit us online at www.rvmt.org

-END-

 
University endowment study shows gains PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Education & Schools
Written by Grassley Press   
Thursday, 27 January 2011 14:24
Sen. Chuck Grassley of Iowa made the following comment on data gathered from 850 U.S. colleges, universities and affiliated foundations participating in the 2010 NACUBO-Commonfund Study of Endowments® (NCSE).  The study shows that these institutions’ endowments returned an average of 11.9 percent (net of fees) for the 2010 fiscal year (July 1, 2009 – June 30, 2010). This represented a sharp improvement over the average -18.7 percent return (net of fees) reported in last year’s study for fiscal year 2009.  Grassley has a long-standing interest in university endowment pay-out rates, drawing on his oversight of tax-exempt policies as a leader of the Finance Committee, with jurisdiction over tax policy.  Grassley’s encouragement of well-funded universities to increase student aid led to some significantly more generous aid policies at several institutions.

“This most recent study strengthens the case for reviewing the investment and payout policies of endowments in the context of tax reform.  Taxpayers and students deserve to understand what they’re getting in return for the tax benefits awarded to these institutions.  These endowment managers should consider the challenge presented by the President in his state of the union speech and expand educational opportunities by making college more affordable for more students

“It’s good to see that university endowments are starting to recover.  Unfortunately, the recoveries aren’t leading to significantly higher payouts.  There are more than 62 institutions with endowments greater than $1 billion and more than half of them are private, tax-exempt charities.  The trends in endowment payout rates show that, even in a good economy, the wealthiest institutions hardly ever exceeded a payout of 5 percent.  The trends also show that my concerns about a 5 percent payout rate being a ceiling rather than a floor are valid.  Private foundations have to pay out at least 5 percent every year, and that’s become a ceiling for them.

“These same billion-dollar endowments are also making significantly greater investments in alternative strategies when compared to their smaller counterparts.  These alternative strategies include illiquid investments such as hedge funds and private equity funds, many of which are likely offshore.  They also include investments in commodities and distressed debt.  These strategies may be legal but they’re not necessarily responsible.  And when the economy declined and students and their families needed the most tuition assistance, many of these institutions raised tuition and lowered endowment payouts because they couldn’t liquidate their investments in these alternative strategies.”

###

 
<< Start < Prev 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 Next > End >>

Page 282 of 321