Education & Schools
Augustana Announces Graduates PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Education & Schools
Written by Keri Rursch   
Tuesday, 05 June 2012 12:42
ROCK ISLAND, IL (05/30/2012)(readMedia)-- Augustana's 152nd commencement took place at the i wireless Center in Moline, Ill., on Sunday, May 20. In all, 558 undergraduates earned their degrees.

Students from your area earning degrees and graduating with honors include:

Erica Aten, from Coal Valley, graduated cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts degree in psychology.

Courtney Brown, from Port Byron, graduated cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts degree in biology.

Owen Engstrom, from Davenport, graduated cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts degree in political science.

Tyler Henning, from Rock Island, graduated cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts degree in computer science and business administration-management information stystems.

Gaetano Iaccarino, from Davenport, graduated cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts degree in music general and anthropology.

Nathaniel McDowell, from Rock Island, graduated cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts degree in English, philosophy, and classics.

Lauren Reid, from Sherrard, graduated cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts degree in business administration-marketing and communication studies.

Amber Soike, from East Moline, graduated cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts degree in elementary education and psychology.

Peter Wessels, from Bettendorf, graduated magna cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts degree in business administration-finance and accounting.

Jennifer Youngs, from Taylor Ridge, graduated cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts degree in psychology and political science.

Students from your area receiving degrees include:

Amanda Eslinger of Coal Valley, received a Bachelor's of Arts degree in art.

Timothy Gillman of Rock Island, received a Bachelor's of Arts degree in geography.

Karla Guadarrama of Rock Island, received a Bachelor's of Arts degree in business administration-marketing.

Randi Johnson of Silvis, received a Bachelor's of Arts degree in communication sciences and disorders.

Megan Keller of Taylor Ridge, received a Bachelor's of Arts degree in communication studies.

Momina Khan of Rock Island, received a Bachelor's of Arts degree in religion and pre-medicine.

Adam Lang of Rock Island, received a Bachelor's of Arts degree in business administration-management.

Anthony Linden of Orion, received a Bachelor's of Arts degree in accounting and business administration-finance.

Conner Martinez of East Moline, received a Bachelor's of Arts degree in accounting.

Melissa Mc Greer of Illinois City, received a Bachelor's of Arts degree in biology.

Timothy Murga of Rock Island, received a Bachelor's of Arts degree in biology.

Michelle Nguyen of East Moline, received a Bachelor's of Arts degree in business administration-management and psychology.

Nicholas Nolte of Rock Island, received a Bachelor's of Arts degree in music general.

Samantha Ott of Milan, received a Bachelor's of Arts degree in sociology-social welfare.

Troy Rorer of Bettendorf, received a Bachelor's of Arts degree in business administration-finance.

Lisa Schippers of East Moline, received a Bachelor's of Arts degree in communication sciences and disorders.

Blythe Sharp of Milan, received a Bachelor's of Arts degree in English.

Dain Swetalla of Davenport, received a Bachelor's of Arts degree in communication studies.

Bo Weber of Illinois City, received a Bachelor's of Arts degree in physics.

Alexander Wenskunas of Davenport, received a Bachelor's of Arts degree in political science.

Laurel Williams of Milan, received a Bachelor's of Arts degree in communication sciences and disorders.

Augustana President Steve Bahls told the graduating Class of 2012 he hopes they will use their liberal arts education to tackle problems from all angles, and the commencement speaker, Broadway's SPIDER-MAN: Turn off the Dark director Philip William McKinley '73, urged them to use their talents and to take risks.

Mr. McKinley urged the grads to not treat their dreams like mom's fine China or save them up for a special vacation, he suggested students "try them out and test them as often as they can."

Founded in 1860 and situated on a 115-acre campus near the Mississippi River, Augustana College is a private, liberal arts institution affiliated with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. The college enrolls 2,500 students from diverse geographic, social, ethnic and religious backgrounds and offers nearly 90 majors and related areas of study. Augustana employs 182 full-time faculty and has a student-faculty ratio of 12:1. Augustana continues to do what it has always done: challenge and prepare students for lives of leadership and service in our complex, ever-changing world.

 
Chase Wilson Education releases a new comprehensive Anti-Bullying Curriculum PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Education & Schools
Written by Chase Wilson   
Monday, 04 June 2012 15:27

This curriculum is for teachers, counselors and administrators grades 6-12 and identifies, in detail, the 20 motivations that lead to harassment, intimidation and bullying and goes far beyond traditional strategies.

 

Park Ridge, NJ - May 30, 2012- Chase Wilson Education is pleased to announce the release of a new comprehensive Anti-Bullying Curriculum The Building Blocks of HIB: Bullying Redefined for teachers, counselors and administrators. The curriculum was developed and written by Andrew Yeager, a NJ School Psychologist and Student Assistance Coordinator, who lectures extensively and conducts trainings on bullying and adolescent issues throughout the country.

 

Based on academic research and clinical experience, this extensive curriculum enables teachers in a variety of disciplines to educate students on the nature and risks of HIB and enables school counselors to assess, intervene, monitor and reduce HIB incidents.

The curriculum, designed for students in grades 6-12, is comprised of three distinct sections:

 

Part One: "The Building Blocks of Bullying" - We redefine bullying - dispelling common myths and exposing the underlying roots of bullying behavior. The curriculum provides a detailed description and analysis of the 20 "Building Blocks" that lead to harassment, intimidation, and bullying (HIB). This information allows educators and students to understand and interpret the true motivations behind bullying like never before.

 

Part Two: "Core Lessons, Classroom Infusion Lessons, & Film Analysis" - Using the "Building Blocks" as a foundation; this highly detailed section provides teachers with a wide variety of lessons to use in the classroom.

  • Core Lessons: An introduction and detailed description of the "The Building Blocks," including a Building Blocks Checklist and Behavioral Assessment Worksheet, to be used in conjunction with multiple Case Studies for student analysis.
  • Classroom Infusion: A variety of lessons that subtly "infuse" anti-HIB education within a variety of subject areas. Lessons are provided for English Language Arts, Math, Science, History, Physical Education and Health, World Languages, Music, Visual Arts, and accommodations for Special Education.
  • Film Analysis: Using the highly effective anti-bullying film Sticks & Stones, students address specific issues such as cyberbullying, homophobia, hate speech and peer pressure.

Part Three: "Counseling the HIB-Involved Student" - This section provides detailed therapeutic strategies for counseling HIB-involved students and includes assessment forms and guidelines for creating effective treatment plans and documenting student progress.

 

This curriculum is available for purchase at http://cweducation.com/BuildingBlocksofHIB.html for $799.99 and includes:

  • A comprehensive curriculum aligned to Core Curriculum Content Standards.
  • Detailed Infusion Lessons provided for 9 school subjects.
  • A FREE copy of Sticks & Stones with an updated Teacher's Guide.
  • Printable handouts, lessons, and treatment plans for enhanced in-school use.
  • Relatable HIB Case Studies inspired by real-life situations.
  • A comprehensive section on assessment and counseling HIB-involved youth. User-friendly assessment and progress forms that clearly demonstrate and document remedial measures and student progress.

Educator Expertise: Andrew Yeager has over 30 years of experience as a counselor working with adolescents, and has written a variety of curricula on cyber-bullying, Internet safety, and DWI prevention. He is a certified school psychologist and presently works as the Student Assistance Coordinator and Anti-Bullying Specialist at Park Ridge public schools in N.J. He is the President of The Association of Student Assistant Professionals of N.J., and lectures throughout the country on issues such as bullying, Internet safety, adolescent risk and substance abuse. Yeager works directly with bullying-related cases every day in the state with the most comprehensive anti-bullying laws in the country.

 

Enhanced Understanding: The Building Blocks of HIB: Bullying Redefined provides an in-depth understanding of the underlying motives behind harassment, intimidation and bullying. Simultaneously, it gives teachers, administrators, counselors and students a universal vocabulary that lays the foundation for better communication, awareness, and response to harassment, intimidation, and bullying.

 

School Inclusivity: Instead of purchasing anti-bullying resources from multiple sources, The Building Blocks of HIB: Bullying Redefined is a one-source solution for the entire school. This is not only cost-effective, but it also ensures a cohesive unity and direction for schools' anti-bullying initiatives.

 

Student Empowerment: By using the The Building Blocks of HIB: Bullying Redefined in coordination with core lessons, infusion lessons, and the film analysis -- educators re-frame the way students see themselves and the actions and motives of those around them. Lessons and activities encourage students to think analytically and introspectively. By making lessons more relevant to them and their unique personal experience, students raise understanding and empathy. "The Building Blocks" inspire students to alter their own behavior and stand up against HIB - enhancing their self-esteem, self-awareness, leadership skills, and overall character.

 

Climate & Culture: The Building Blocks of HIB: Bullying Redefined gives educators the tools they need to re-shape the culture and climate of their school from the inside out. This includes strategies to enhance engagement in classroom and school-wide programs, and promotes healthier teen relationships and positive role modeling.

 

This program is designed to create a healthier school climate and culture; one which resonates long beyond emotionally-charged assemblies, poster contests, and traditional lectures. The Building Blocks of HIB: Bullying Redefined creates an enduring experience that will greatly impact their day-to-day lives.

 

About Chase Wilson Education:

Chase Wilson Education is an organization in the state of New Jersey that is comprised of a diverse team of filmmakers, educators, law enforcement, and healthcare professionals all working together to improve education, health, and social development in our world.

Our Mission is to provide educator training and student programs centered on a values-based curriculum that provides a foundation of character, tolerance, and empathy.

CWE is a division of Chase Wilson; an Emmy-Nominated multimedia production company incorporated in the state of New Jersey. Chase Wilson Education was founded in 2011 with a sole focus on the future development, creation, and distribution of educational films and programs.

 

 

###

 
Adam Reab of Blue Grass earns Grainger Power Engineering Award from Missouri S&T PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Education & Schools
Written by Mary Helen Stoltz   
Monday, 04 June 2012 15:18

ROLLA, MO (05/30/2012)(readMedia)-- Adam Reab of Blue Grass, Iowa, is one of 13 seniors and recent graduates to receive a $5,000 Grainger Power Engineering Award from the electrical engineering department at Missouri University of Science and Technology this spring. The awards are presented as a reward for academic excellence.

The Power Engineering Awards are funded by a $1.3 million endowment from The Grainger Foundation of Chicago. Missouri S&T is recognized by Grainger for its ability to attract top students and educate quality engineers and is one of only six universities in the nation chosen to receive such funding.

Each spring, the Grainger Power Engineering Award is typically presented to up to 13 electrical engineering graduate and undergraduate students who plan to pursue careers in power engineering. Selection of recipients is based on academic performance, exhibited interest in power engineering and extra-curricular activities.

To be eligible for this year's award, students must have graduated with degrees in electrical engineering in August or December of 2011 or May 2012 and have emphasized their course work in power engineering. All of the recipients had significant power engineering experience, either through company internships, research projects or design projects.

Reab earned a bachelor of science degree in electrical engineering from Missouri S&T in 2012.

 
Adam Reab of Blue Grass earns Grainger Power Engineering Award from Missouri S&T PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Education & Schools
Written by Mary Helen Stoltz   
Monday, 04 June 2012 15:18

ROLLA, MO (05/30/2012)(readMedia)-- Adam Reab of Blue Grass, Iowa, is one of 13 seniors and recent graduates to receive a $5,000 Grainger Power Engineering Award from the electrical engineering department at Missouri University of Science and Technology this spring. The awards are presented as a reward for academic excellence.

The Power Engineering Awards are funded by a $1.3 million endowment from The Grainger Foundation of Chicago. Missouri S&T is recognized by Grainger for its ability to attract top students and educate quality engineers and is one of only six universities in the nation chosen to receive such funding.

Each spring, the Grainger Power Engineering Award is typically presented to up to 13 electrical engineering graduate and undergraduate students who plan to pursue careers in power engineering. Selection of recipients is based on academic performance, exhibited interest in power engineering and extra-curricular activities.

To be eligible for this year's award, students must have graduated with degrees in electrical engineering in August or December of 2011 or May 2012 and have emphasized their course work in power engineering. All of the recipients had significant power engineering experience, either through company internships, research projects or design projects.

Reab earned a bachelor of science degree in electrical engineering from Missouri S&T in 2012.

 
Helping Teens Financially Means More Than Handing Them Money PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Education & Schools
Written by Ginny Grimsley   
Monday, 04 June 2012 15:16
5 Tips for Turning Adolescents into Fiscally Smart Adults

As children blossom into young men and women, most insist on planning and running their own lives. Parents worry about all the basic essentials for their kids’ independent living, like housing, eating properly, staying warm, being careful at night and more. But most parents forget to teach their youngsters one of the most important lessons of all – financial responsibility. The resulting turmoil can spell disaster for a child’s future.

Consider this: The average young adult amasses $45,000 in debt by the time they turn 29, according to a recent PNC Bank report.

“This generation of 20-somethings was raised during an economically-thriving period,” says financial expert Mark Hansen, author of Success 101 for Teens (www.success101forteens.com). “Undisciplined spending habits, student and car loans, and a tough job market have stymied their financial growth. Perhaps the worst culprit is financial ignorance, but we can count this as a lesson for future 20-somethings.”

For young people, organizing finances can be intimidating to the point of prohibitive, he says.

“We need to have a curriculum in schools, from kindergarten through 12th grade, that ensures our kids graduate with financially literacy,” he says. “From balancing a checkbook to understanding what it means to pay – and earn – interest, kids need basic money management skills to survive in the world, and most aren’t getting them.”

Hansen says all teens should know and practice so they can control their financial destinies:

• Saving for dreams – the three-envelope method: Use the first envelope for your day-to-day expenses: gas or lunch money. Pause before blowing this money at the movie theater or a fast-food restaurant! Envelope No. 2 is for short-term goals, which might be clothing or a new laptop. The third envelope is for long-term goals such as a car, college or a “future millionaire club” fund.

• How to create a budget: A budget lets us know what’s possible, and not possible, with money. There are six steps to creating a budget. 1. List all of your expenses. 2. List all income. 3. List monthly expenses. 4. Add up these lists separately. 5. Tweak your budget so you can meet your expenses with money left over for savings. 6. Review your budget every week.

• How to set and follow through on goals: First, figure out what your current finances are, then determine what they will be in the future -- one year out, then two years out, then four years later, etc. How will you get to your one- or two-year goal? You need a plan, and most of the time that means either earning more money, spending less, or a combination of the two. Finally, you have to stick to your plan in order for it to work.

• Understanding interest rates, such as credit cards: Interest is a fee paid for using someone else’s money. Simple interest is straightforward: 5 percent accrued in your bank account with $100 yields $5 in interest at the end of the year. Compound interest, however, means ever-increasing amounts. This is crucial to understanding debt you may take on from lenders. Know what you are borrowing, and the terms thereof. Just as your money can work for you in a bank account, money borrowed can work against you if it is not paid back in a timely manner.

• How to write checks and balance a checkbook: These days, it’s easier than ever to review accounts online, which automatically tracks exchanges. HOWEVER, banks do make mistakes, which is why it’s wise to track your accounts independently. Ask. Don’t be embarrassed. Banks are putting a premium on service and want to establish a positive relationship with young customers.  If you have a question, speak to someone at the bank. As you take control of your money, you’ll also take control of your life.

About Mark Hansen

A successful businessman, a former Palm Beach County, Fla., elected school board member and motivational speaker, Mark has dedicated his life to helping young people overcome obstacles and deal with the challenges of daily living. Struck by a car and nearly killed as a child, Mark fought back through positive actions and reactions to all that he had to overcome. As a result, he relates to teens in a very special way.  Through books such as, “Success 101 for Teens: Dollars and Sense for a Winning Financial Life,” and seminars, Mark Hansen is driven to make an impact on teens and young adults and to empower them to rise above and triumph over life’s obstacles.

 
<< Start < Prev 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 Next > End >>

Page 184 of 320