Environment & Weather
Soy Checkoff Salutes New York City Efforts to Go Green PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Environment & Weather
Written by United Soybean Board   
Friday, 31 May 2013 13:18

United Soybean Board farmer-leaders honor use of biodiesel and other soy products

ST. LOUIS (May 31, 2013) – With the help of U.S. soy, New York City is learning that it’s actually pretty easy to be green with products such as soy-backed carpeting and synthetic grass.

 

In addition, New York’s greenhouse-gas-reduction strategy includes the use of cleaner-burning biodiesel in the ports of New York and New Jersey and requirements for the use of Bioheat®, a blend of biodiesel with traditional heating oil.

 

“It’s a good thing for U.S. soybean farmers to have New York City asking for and using our products, the first being biodiesel, followed by Bioheat®and now soy-based carpet-backing,” says Lewis Bainbridge, a soybean farmer and United Soybean Board (USB) secretary from Ethan, S.D. “It speaks volumes about the quality of soybeans produced in the U.S. for food, feed, fuel and industrial products.”

 

Bainbridge recently joined fellow soy checkoff farmer-leader Sharon Covert, a farmer from Tiskilwa, Ill., in recognizing New York sites that use biobased products. One stop was an Applebee’s restaurant in the Harlem neighborhood, where the franchise owner had installed carpeting with soy-based backing throughout the restaurant. USB also acknowledged the installment of AstroTurf® with soy-based backing in Battery Park, just two blocks from the nearly complete One World Trade Center monument at ground zero.

 

“As U.S. soybean farmers, we are excited to support many products that bring benefits to New York City residents,” adds Covert, who also serves as USB Customer Focus Action Team chair. “The soy checkoff is pleased that state-of-the-art products, such as biodiesel, carpet and AstroTurf, use soy as a renewable ingredient for sustainability.”

 

The soy checkoff invests in research, development and commercialization of new products that contain U.S. soy. Thanks in part to this relationship, 45 new soy-based products hit the market last year.

 

The 69 farmer-directors of USB oversee the investments of the soy checkoff to maximize profit opportunities for all U.S. soybean farmers. These volunteers invest and leverage checkoff funds to increase the value of U.S. soy meal and oil, to ensure U.S. soybean farmers and their customers have the freedom and infrastructure to operate, and to meet the needs of U.S. soy’s customers. As stipulated in the federal Soybean Promotion, Research and Consumer Information Act, the USDA Agricultural Marketing Service has oversight responsibilities for USB and the soy checkoff.

For more information on the United Soybean Board, visit www.unitedsoybean.org
Visit us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/UnitedSoybeanBoard
Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/unitedsoy
View our YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/user/UnitedSoybeanBoard

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Texas Wing personnel still on duty in tornado-ravaged Oklahoma PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Environment & Weather
Written by Steve Cox   
Wednesday, 29 May 2013 15:41
CAP's Oklahoma Tornadoes Response

MAXWELL AIR FORCE BASE, Ala. – Dozens of personnel from Civil Air Patrol’s Texas Wing remain on duty in Moore, Okla., performing photo damage assessment of homes, public buildings and businesses more than a week after a twister ripped through the town of about 45,000 residents.

“Texas Wing has been absolutely monumental in us completing the mission that FEMA has given us,” said Capt. Rick Rutledge, public affairs officer for CAP’s Oklahoma Wing. “They were able to send us members almost immediately after the tornado struck. We’ve had Texas Wing boots on the ground literally in less than 24 hours.”

The EF-5 twister mowed its destructive path through Moore May 20, killing seven students when it demolished Plaza Towers Elementary School. Moore is located in the central part of the state and is considered part of Oklahoma City’s metropolitan area. The area is known as “Tornado Alley.”

CAP’s role in the recovery phase involves detailing the destruction from both ground and air for the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

“We’re literally having to send teams to each and every house and business that’s been damaged. From the air side, we’ve been able to provide FEMA with high-definition photographs for the entire 17-mile track of the tornado,” Rutledge said.

An estimated 80 CAP air and ground team members — many of them teenage cadets — from Oklahoma, Texas, Kansas and Arkansas are augmenting 450 FEMA personnel who, by Memorial Day, had delivered 43,000 meals and 150,000 liters of water, along with thousands of cots, blankets and other comfort items. FEMA officials say 4,200 people have applied for disaster assistance. The agency has approved an estimated $3.4 million in emergency cash payments to victims of the tornado.

“Texas Wing is honored to have the opportunity to serve in the support mission for the Moore, Okla., tornado,” said Col. Brooks Cima, Texas Wing commander.

Cima says approximately 30 Texas Wing members are in Oklahoma, providing air and ground communications and mission support in addition to performing damage assessment. She said CAP wings have a long tradition of supporting each other during emergencies.

“Oklahoma Wing has supported Texas when we’ve suffered from hurricanes,” said Cima. “We owe them that same loyalty.”

President Barack Obama toured the town over the Memorial Day Weekend to offer encouragement to Moore’s citizens, thank first responders, survey the damage, and assure state and local officials that federal aid would be swift and long-term.

Moore previously suffered extensive damage from tornados on Oct. 4, 1998; May 3, 1999, May 8, 2003; and May 10, 2012. The 1999 twister was at the time considered the costliest in U.S. history.

Civil Air Patrol (CAP), the official auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force, is a nonprofit organization chartered by Congress in 1941 with a 501(c)3 designation and pre-dates the Air Force. CAP consists of 61,000 unpaid professional members nationwide, and operates a fleet of 550 aircraft. CAP, in its Air Force auxiliary role, performs 90 percent of continental U.S. inland search and rescue missions as tasked by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center (AFRCC) and is credited by the AFRCC with saving an average of 80 lives annually. Its unpaid professionals also perform homeland security, disaster relief and drug interdiction missions at the request of federal, state and local agencies. The members play a leading role in aerospace education and serve as mentors to more than 26,000 young people currently participating in the CAP cadet programs. CAP is a force multiplier to the Air Force CAP received the World Peace Prize in 2011 and has been performing missions for America for 71 years. CAP also participates in Wreaths Across America, an initiative to remember, honor and teach about the sacrifices of U.S. military veterans.

 
Loebsack Statement on Preparations Underway for Potential Flooding PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Environment & Weather
Written by Joe Hand   
Tuesday, 28 May 2013 15:02

Washington, D.C. – Congressman Dave Loebsack released the following statement today as various local, state and federal agencies make preparations for the possibility of damaging flooding.

“As the danger of damaging floods continues to threaten Eastern Iowa, I remain in close contact with University of Iowa officials, local officials, as well as officials at the Army Corps of Engineers to monitor the situation.  I commend the University for taking precautionary actions to prepare for any flooding that may occur.  With the 10th Anniversary of the Floods of 2003 approaching, we have learned a great deal about how to prepare in advance for the worst situation.  My office and I will continue to coordinate with officials on all levels to determine the best way to move forward.”

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The Salvation Army Responds to Devastating Tornadoes in Oklahoma PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Environment & Weather
Written by Holly Nomura   
Friday, 24 May 2013 12:22

The Salvation Army is on the ground in Moore, Oklahoma with multiple canteens and personnel coordinating with Local and State Emergency Management to serve first responders and those affected by the tornado. We continue to provide service to hard hit areas from Tuesdays’ storms which include Shawnee – multiple sites, Carney area, and Cleveland County.

Meals and hydration are being provided for first responders and those affected.   Major Steve Morris, Arkansas-Oklahoma Divisional Commander has been driving around the affected area.    Major Morris states “The devastation is far reaching both in human life, property and livestock loss.  The Salvation Army is honored to serve and provide sustenance to first responders involved in search and rescue, coordination efforts and more.  And, of course, all survivors will be provided spiritual and emotional care."

Canteens involved in the response from Oklahoma include Central Oklahoma Area Command (Oklahoma City), Ardmore, Enid, Lawton, McAlester and Muskogee.  Also, disaster response teams from Pine Bluff, Jonesboro and Hot Springs, Arkansas are en route to the Oklahoma City metropolitan area to assist in response.  Personnel from across the division are also traveling to the area to form a Divisional Incident Command Team (which helps coordinate the overall response for The Salvation Army).  Central Oklahoma Area Command has established a local Incident Command team for response.

The Salvation Army is ready to provide the services mentioned above for as long as we are needed.  Additional updates will be provided as more information becomes available.  Please follow us at  http://centralusa.salvationarmy.org, www.twitter.com/SalArmyAOKEDS, www.twitter.com/CindyFullerOKC, www.twitter.com/SalArmyAOK  and www.facebook.com/SalArmyAOK for additional information.

Cash donations allow The Salvation Army to purchase product to quickly and efficiently meet the most urgent needs of disaster victims.  When possible, the purchases are made near the disaster site to stimulate the local economy and ensure quicker delivery.It is easy to give to The Salvation Army:

· By phone at 1-800-SAL-ARMY (1-800-725-2769)

· Online at www.salvationarmyusa.org

· By mail:

The Salvation Army - Disaster Relief

P.O. BOX 2536

Oklahoma City, OK 73102

Please make checks payable to "The Salvation Army" and clearly marked "May 2013 Oklahoma Tornadoes."

Text To Give:  You can also text the word “STORM” to 80888 to make a $10 donation through your mobile phone; to confirm your gift, respond with the word “Yes.”*

Your donations make a real difference.

• A $10 donation feeds a disaster survivor for one day.

• A $30 donation provides one food box, containing staple foods for a family of four, or one household cleanup kit, containing brooms, mops, buckets and other cleaning supplies

• A $100 donation can serve snacks and drinks for 125 survivors and emergency personnel at the scene of a disaster.

• A $250 donation can provide one hot meal to 100 people or keep a hydration station operational for 24 hours

• A $500 donation keeps a Salvation Army canteen (mobile feeding unit) fully operational for one day Volunteers

The Salvation Army recruits and deploys disaster workers through its local Salvation Army units. To be trained as a disaster worker:

- Call the Quad Cities Salvation Army at 563-271-7933 to be added to the list for the next training.

The Salvation Army deploys trained disaster workers who have completed the 8-hour training course. A standard deployment is two weeks, including twelve working days and two travel days.   

OK Tornado 5-20-13.jpg

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Civil Air Patrol takes flight into Canada to help monitor expected flooding PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Environment & Weather
Written by Steve Cox   
Friday, 24 May 2013 12:20

MAXWELL AIR FORCE BASE, Ala. – In what is another first for Civil Air Patrol, aircrews from the U.S. Air Force auxiliary’s North Dakota Wing are flying into Canada to take aerial assessment photos in advance of expected flooding from spring thawing of ice and snow.

Secretary of the Air Force Michael B. Donley approved the CAP imagery flights, which began last Friday over the Souris River basin and could continue for the next two weeks. The request for CAP’s assistance came from North Dakota through the state’s adjutant general, Maj. Gen. David Sprynczynatyk.

The CAP flights are unique in that the aircraft are taking off and landing in the U.S. but are being flown in Canadian airspace.

“We greatly appreciate the secretary of the Air Force’s approval for North Dakota Civil Air Patrol to conduct incident awareness and assessment flights into Canada,” said Sprynczynatyk. “This is a very distinctive mission, and based on years of flood experience, uniquely suited for our pilots. It is exciting to work with our international partners to the north to better understand the impact of flooding along rivers, which we share as a common concern.”

The Souris River, or Mouse River as it is known in the U.S., is 435 miles in length. Originating in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan, it flows south into North Dakota through the city of Minot and reaches its southern point at the town of Velva, and then back north through the central part of the state into Manitoba, Canada.

“We took the Ward County Emergency Management with us on Friday, so they could get an idea of what is coming our way,” said North Dakota Wing Commander Col. Bill Kay, incident commander for the CAP flights.

Ward County and its county seat of Minot have experienced significant flooding several times in recent years and more is expected this spring because of higher than usual snow packs during the winter, as well as heavy rains over the past weekend.

After last Friday’s initial flight into Canada, rains grounded CAP aircrews over the past few days, but they were expected to return to the skies over the Souris River today to collect new imagery. “Now that we’ve got the secretary of the Air Force’s permission to fly across the border, we can launch when the weather permits,” said Kay. “That new imagery will give us a better idea of what we’ll be dealing with in coming days.”

In addition to using CAP’s aerial photos to predict where high waters might occur in North Dakota, the state is also sharing the imagery with the Manitoba Emergency Measures Organization, so officials in the Canadian province can monitor the flooding potential there.

Civil Air Patrol (CAP), the official auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force, is a nonprofit organization chartered by Congress in 1941 with a 501(c)(3) designation and pre-dates the Air Force. CAP consists of 61,000 unpaid professional members nationwide, and operates a fleet of 550 aircraft. CAP, in its Air Force auxiliary role, performs 90 percent of continental U.S. inland search and rescue missions as tasked by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center (AFRCC) and is credited by the AFRCC with saving an average of 80 lives annually. Its unpaid professionals also perform homeland security, disaster relief and drug interdiction missions at the request of federal, state and local agencies. The members play a leading role in aerospace education and serve as mentors to more than 26,000 young people currently participating in the CAP cadet programs. CAP is a force multiplier to the Air Force CAP received the World Peace Prize in 2011 and has been performing missions for America for 71 years. CAP also participates in Wreaths Across America, an initiative to remember, honor and teach about the sacrifices of U.S. military veterans.

 
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