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Is Marijuana the Bootleggers’ 21st Century ‘Moonshine’? PDF Print E-mail
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Written by Ginny Grimsley   
Friday, 11 January 2013 14:01
Prohibition Researcher Cites Historic Parallels

Whether they realize it or not, residents of Colorado and Washington have traveled back in time – 80 years, to be exact.

The first two states to decriminalize recreational marijuana are sharing in the national experience of 1933: the end of Prohibition. And the similarities are uncanny, says Prohibition-era researcher and author Denise Frisino.

“As with Prohibition and the criminalization of alcohol production and sales, after marijuana possession was banned in 1937 there were many unintended negative consequences,” maintains Frisino, author of “Whiskey Cove,” (www.whiskeycovebook.com), a novel based on firsthand interviews with Prohibition-era bootleggers in the Pacific Northwest.

“The most obvious is the proliferation of corruption and organized gangs. After Prohibition became effective in 1920, America saw the rise of unprecedented crime.”

And, as was true in the 1920s, increasing crime means a greater need for – and expenditures on – law enforcement and judicial services. Enforcing the Prohibition cost the federal government more than $300 million.

In the interest of learning from history, Frisino cites these additional parallels to Prohibition and our contemporary problems with criminalized marijuana:

• Public safety: During Prohibition, there was no regulatory oversight on the production of alcohol, which meant some illegally brewed and tampered with liquors were downright dangerous. “Bad booze actually killed people,” Frisino says. On average, 1,000 people a year died from drinking tainted alcohol. Marijuana, too, can be dangerous when dealers lace their product with chemicals to make it seem more potent. One benefit of decriminalization is that the quality of substances can be monitored. In Colorado, the growing process is strictly monitored from seed to sale.

• Tax revenues: The federal and state governments lost $11 billion in tax revenues during Prohibition, which was especially painful for states like New York, where nearly 75 percent of revenue came from liquor sales. Today, with the country still reeling from the Great Recession, legalization of marijuana will provide some much-needed extra tax income for Washington and Colorado.

• Medical uses: Like marijuana, alcohol has medicinal uses. Physicians of the early 20th century prescribed it for a variety of ailments. During Prohibition pharmacies could sell medicinal liquor, which led to a spike in the numbers of pharmacies as bootleggers set up shop.

• Common criminals: As with marijuana, outlawing alcohol turned many average Americans into outlaws. During the 13 years of Prohibition, jobs were lost and families crumbled as breadwinners went to jail and became stigmatized as lawbreakers. The number of federal convicts increased 561 percent, according to Mark Thorton’s, “Policy Analysis: Alcohol Prohibition Was a Failure.” In 2004, more than 12 percent of the drug offenders in federal and state prisons were convicted of crimes involving marijuana, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics. And that’s just prisons – it doesn’t include local jail populations.

The Prohibition era holds valuable lessons about the unforeseen outcome of criminalizing “vices,” Frisino points out. Rather than reducing alcohol consumption, which was the goal, it actually increased from 1929 to 1933, she says. In addition, legitimate jobs and businesses were destroyed and even restaurants and other entertainment businesses suffered.

“History teaches us that going about change by criminalizing certain behaviors can have a very negative impact on society,” Frisino says.

About Denise Frisino

Denise Frisino is an award-winning writer, actress and arts teacher. She has spent her summers playing and working in the numerous islands that define the Pacific Northwest, where her family spans four generations. Frisino and her husband spend time at Hood Canal and reside in Seattle. Her novel, “Whiskey Cove,” is a nominee for the 2013 Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association Award.

 
State of the Judiciary Message — January 16 PDF Print E-mail
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Written by Iowa Judical Branch   
Friday, 11 January 2013 13:57

Des Moines, January 9, 2013— On Wednesday, January 16, 2013, at 10 a.m. in the House Chambers of the Iowa State Capitol, Chief Justice Mark Cady of the Iowa Supreme Court will address a joint convention of the General Assembly on the State of the Judiciary.

Live video of the speech will be broadcast live on the Iowa Public Television .3 Channel (IPTV World) and streamed live on the Iowa Public Television website (www.iptv.org) beginning at 10:00 a.m. The speech will be rebroadcast in HD at 6:30 p.m. on statewide IPTV's main channel.  A summary of the topics that the Chief Justice will address in the speech will be released Tuesday, January 15, 2013.

Members of the media may obtain advance copies of the speech January 16, 2013, at 8:30 a.m. in the supreme court courtroom at the Capitol. The message will be posted on the Iowa Judicial Branch website www.iowacourts.gov at 10:45 a.m.

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State of the Judiciary Message — January 16 PDF Print E-mail
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Written by Iowa Judical Branch   
Friday, 11 January 2013 13:55

Des Moines, January 9, 2013— On Wednesday, January 16, 2013, at 10 a.m. in the House Chambers of the Iowa State Capitol, Chief Justice Mark Cady of the Iowa Supreme Court will address a joint convention of the General Assembly on the State of the Judiciary.

Live video of the speech will be broadcast live on the Iowa Public Television .3 Channel (IPTV World) and streamed live on the Iowa Public Television website (www.iptv.org) beginning at 10:00 a.m. The speech will be rebroadcast in HD at 6:30 p.m. on statewide IPTV's main channel.  A summary of the topics that the Chief Justice will address in the speech will be released Tuesday, January 15, 2013.

Members of the media may obtain advance copies of the speech January 16, 2013, at 8:30 a.m. in the supreme court courtroom at the Capitol. The message will be posted on the Iowa Judicial Branch website www.iowacourts.gov at 10:45 a.m.

# # #

 
Simon congratulates members of 98th General Assembly PDF Print E-mail
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Written by Annie Thompson   
Wednesday, 09 January 2013 14:52

SPRINGFIELD – January 9, 2013. Lt. Governor Sheila Simon today attended the inauguration ceremony for members of the Illinois House of Representatives and issued the following statement congratulating all new members of the Illinois General Assembly sworn in today.

“I would like to welcome and congratulate the men and women who today became members of the Illinois legislature. There are a number of extremely important issues facing our state that will be addressed by the 98th General Assembly, and I applaud their dedication to serving the public and tackling these issues.

“I would also like to congratulate Senate President John Cullerton, Senate Minority Leader Christine Radogno, House Speaker Michael Madigan and House Minority Leader Tom Cross, who were selected to continue leading their caucuses. I appreciate their bipartisan work on behalf of the people of Illinois.

“I look forward to working with the 98th General Assembly as we find solutions that will enable us to pay our bills and bring our fiscal house in order, while continuing to fund priorities like education, health care and social services. We must also work together to restore faith in government by passing ethics reform legislation.”

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Opinions of the Iowa Court of Appeals PDF Print E-mail
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Written by Iowa Judical Branch   
Wednesday, 09 January 2013 09:38

Opinions of the Iowa Court of Appeals will be filed at 8:30 a.m. on the dates listed below:

2013

 

 

 

January 9

April 24

August 7

November 20

January 24

May 15

August 21

December 5

February 13

May 30

September 5

December 18

February 27

June 12

September 18

 

March 13

June 26

October 2

 

March 27

July 10

October 23

 

April 10

July 24

November 6

 

 

 

 

For your convenience, the Judicial Branch offers a free e-mail notification service for supreme court opinions, court of appeals opinions, press releases and orders.

Opinions Expected Next Filing Date

 

A list of cases on which the Iowa Court of Appeals is expected to rule will be posted at 8:30 a.m. one day preceding each opinion filing day.

 

Most Recent Opinions

 

 

Summaries for Most Recent Opinions

Click here for summaries of selected opinions most recently filed by the Iowa Court of Appeals. 

Opinions Archive

This archive contains opinions from 1998 to the present. Summaries of opinions are archived for opinions filed between 1998 to April 12, 2006 only.

Opinions released before April 2006 and available in the archives are posted in Word format. Opinions released after April 2006 are posted to the website in PDF (Portable Document Format).   Note: To open a PDF you must have the free Acrobat Reader installed. PDF format preserves the original appearance of a document without requiring you to possess the software that created that document. For more information about PDF read: Using the Adobe Reader.

 
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