General Info
Governor Quinn Names Kelly Kraft Director of Communications PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - General Info
Written by Nafia Khan   
Monday, 16 July 2012 13:31

Kraft to Oversee State Communication Operations;

Mica Matsoff to Serve as a Senior Advisor

CHICAGO – July 13, 2012. Governor Pat Quinn today announced that Kelly Kraft will serve as his Director of Communications, effective on Monday. Kraft has served as the Assistant Director and Communications Director of the Governor's Office of Management and Budget (GOMB). Mica Matsoff will become Senior Advisor to the Governor. As communications director, Kraft will work closely with Brooke Anderson, who continues to serve as Press Secretary to the Governor.

"Kelly Kraft is a true professional who will do an excellent job communicating major policy issues to the people of Illinois,” Governor Quinn said. "I thank Mica for her great work as communication director, and appreciate her willingness to step up and into this new role to tackle some of the most pressing issues facing the state.”

As Director of Communications, Kraft will plan and oversee the execution of the administration’s internal and external communications. She will work closely with senior members of the Governor’s staff and cabinet to develop policies that impact the people of Illinois and move the state forward.

Kraft has served as Assistant Budget Director, helping to guide Illinois' pension reforms, Medicaid restructuring, and Budgeting for Results initiatives. She has also managed complex subjects like debt issuance, financial reporting and budget policy. Prior to her career in public service, Kraft was an award winning and Emmy nominated journalist. She worked as a news anchor, reporter, producer and editor in major television markets such as Las Vegas, Buffalo, San Diego and Chicago. Kraft has also hosted and narrated the award-winning PBS documentaries “Kids in Peril” for law enforcement agencies and students in criminal justice programs.

Kraft earned her bachelor's degree from Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana where she studied Journalism and Political Science. Upon graduation, she was awarded the Ross Hazeltine Scholarship, which allowed her to live in Eastern Europe to research life after the fall of communism.  She also studied at Thames Valley University in England. She grew up in Peru, Illinois in La Salle County.

As Senior Advisor, Matsoff will oversee key agencies, develop and implement strategies on high-profile issues, and coordinate policies and initiatives across various agencies of government. Matsoff has been with the Governor’s Office since January 2011 as communications director. Prior to that, she managed press operations at Quinn for Illinois, Chicago 2016, and the departments of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) and Employment Security. She earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

###

 
Governor Pat Quinn Takes Clemency Action PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - General Info
Written by Nafia Khan   
Monday, 16 July 2012 13:21
CHICAGO – July 13, 2012. Governor Pat Quinn today granted 43 and denied 102 clemency petitions. This action marks another step in a series of clemency decisions aimed at eliminating a backlog of more than 2,500 cases that built up during the previous administration.

The 145 clemency petitions acted upon by Governor Quinn are part of dockets ranging from 2005 through 2011.  Each person granted clemency has recently undergone a criminal background check through the Illinois State Police’s Law Enforcement Agencies Data System (LEADS). A granted clemency request for a pardon with expungement allows the petitioner to seek expungement of their conviction through the court system.

Since taking office, Governor Quinn has acted on 2068 clemency petitions. Governor Quinn has granted 761 and denied 1307 petitions. Those actions include granting 743 pardons and authorizing 17 people who had previously received pardons to seek expungement of their convictions.

For additional information on the granted clemency cases, please contact Ken Tupy at the Prisoner Review Board at (217) 782-7274 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 

###

 
Disciplinary Spanking Gets a Bum Rap PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - General Info
Written by American College of Pediatricians   
Friday, 13 July 2012 12:28

Gainesville, Florida – July 12, 2012 - With the release of a biased report in the journal Pediatrics implying that spanking causes mental disorders, researcher Afifi continues the all-too-common unscientific assault on disciplinary spanking.

By studying the experience of "harsh physical punishment" defined as “pushed, grabbed, shoved, slapped, or hit by their parents," Afif discovered a small association (not causation) with mental disorders in adults.  The survey used to gather the data never asked about "spanking" and never limited the experience to that of a defiant child who may have received an ordinary spanking.  Yet, the researchers conclude that all physical punishment (including spanking) "should not be used with children of any age.”

Furthermore, participants in the study were most likely recalling experiences as teens, since retrospective reports correlate highest with events occurring at this age.   Adolescence is certainly not a recommended age for the use of any physical punishment.

The researchers gloss over their finding that "individuals with a family history of dysfunction were more likely to experience harsh physical punishment."  That is a better explanation for this association than the one they postulate.  It is well known that the use of harsh discipline is often a marker for trouble families and such an unhealthy environment takes its toll on a child.

So, the researchers study the inappropriate use of harsh physical punishment used at inappropriate ages within dysfunctional families, and state that all spanking should be prohibited.  The American College of Pediatricians calls upon researchers and medical publishers to stop this unwarranted assault and return to evidence-based research. Visit www.Best4Children.org for details on the appropriate use of disciplinary spanking.

###

The American College of Pediatricians is a national medical association of licensed physicians and healthcare professionals who specialize in the care of infants, children, and adolescents. The mission of the College is to enable all children to reach their optimal physical and emotional health and well-being. For more information about the College, please visit our website www.Best4Children.org.

 
Disciplinary Spanking Gets a Bum Rap PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - General Info
Written by American College of Pediatricians   
Friday, 13 July 2012 12:28

Gainesville, Florida – July 12, 2012 - With the release of a biased report in the journal Pediatrics implying that spanking causes mental disorders, researcher Afifi continues the all-too-common unscientific assault on disciplinary spanking.

By studying the experience of "harsh physical punishment" defined as “pushed, grabbed, shoved, slapped, or hit by their parents," Afif discovered a small association (not causation) with mental disorders in adults.  The survey used to gather the data never asked about "spanking" and never limited the experience to that of a defiant child who may have received an ordinary spanking.  Yet, the researchers conclude that all physical punishment (including spanking) "should not be used with children of any age.”

Furthermore, participants in the study were most likely recalling experiences as teens, since retrospective reports correlate highest with events occurring at this age.   Adolescence is certainly not a recommended age for the use of any physical punishment.

The researchers gloss over their finding that "individuals with a family history of dysfunction were more likely to experience harsh physical punishment."  That is a better explanation for this association than the one they postulate.  It is well known that the use of harsh discipline is often a marker for trouble families and such an unhealthy environment takes its toll on a child.

So, the researchers study the inappropriate use of harsh physical punishment used at inappropriate ages within dysfunctional families, and state that all spanking should be prohibited.  The American College of Pediatricians calls upon researchers and medical publishers to stop this unwarranted assault and return to evidence-based research. Visit www.Best4Children.org for details on the appropriate use of disciplinary spanking.

###

The American College of Pediatricians is a national medical association of licensed physicians and healthcare professionals who specialize in the care of infants, children, and adolescents. The mission of the College is to enable all children to reach their optimal physical and emotional health and well-being. For more information about the College, please visit our website www.Best4Children.org.

 
Money Saving Laundry Tips PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - General Info
Written by Ginny Grimsley   
Friday, 13 July 2012 12:14
The national crime wave that stunned the nation earlier this spring – coast-to-coast thefts of Tide laundry detergent and its use in illicit drug buys – didn’t surprise Kris Anderson.

“Laundry detergent can be expensive and it’s a product just about everyone values – even drug dealers,” says Anderson, president of Country Save Corp. (www.countrysave.com), maker of all-natural laundry and dish detergents.

“But it’s not just stores getting ripped off; it’s consumers. Anyone who buys laundry detergent and doesn’t pay close attention when they scoop it ends up using too much,” Anderson says. “Not only is it a fallacy to believe that more soap will make your clothes cleaner, it’s a huge waste of money and it’s actually bad for your clothes.”

Almost every brand of detergent has a declaration of loads per box on its packaging, he says. And for almost every brand, the number on the box does not match the scooper size provided in the box.

Anderson, whose environmentally safe Country Save laundry detergent is also distributed by the Department of Defense to all soldiers in the field, offers these facts about using your detergent prudently and economically.

• Don’t just fill up the scoop and dump it in the washer. “You definitely won’t get the maximum number of loads from the box,” Anderson says. “For instance, if you use Ultra Tide’s 40-load box and fill the scoop for every load, you’ll get just 15 scoops per box.” Instead, he says, put on your glasses, if necessary, and look at the lines on the side of the scoop. The top line, for a full load, is usually well below the lip of the scoop. Highlight the lines with a dark-colored marker to help you avoid the problem in the future. If you have soft water, using half the recommended amount is sufficient.

• Too much soap causes clothes to fade faster. Over-use of detergent is actually the leading cause of fading. Clothing may also acquire a thin, filmy layer of soap because your washer can’t thoroughly rinse the fabric. Do you tend to be itchy? It could be you’re wearing your detergent!

• Too much soap’s not good for your washing machine, either. Excess soap can gum up the works as soap deposits and lint form in your washing machine. These can contribute to mold – and its accompanying stench; they can plug up filters and other openings; and they can lead to mechanical breakdowns. In some machines, you may also end up wasting (and spending more for) water as the machine spins into extended cycles in an effort to remove the soap.

• Run a test load to see if you’re over-soaping. Run a load with clothes only – no detergent. Do you see suds? That’s an indication of how much detergent you are wearing.

• Reduce pollutants by using an all-natural detergent. While Country Save had the first phosphate-free detergent on the market back in 1977, many companies have now removed the additive because of its harmful effects on rivers, lakes and other fresh water. However, most companies continue to use other additives, such as optic brighteners, fragrances and dyes, Anderson says. “The more often consumers choose the most natural products, the better off our environment will be – even if some people still use too much!

About Country Save Detergent

Country Save became the nation’s first phosphate-free detergent when Elmer Pearson – creator of Elmer’s Glue -- introduced it in 1977. A chemist and environmentalist, he developed Country Save products without animal testing or animal byproducts. They’re designed to be environmentally safe and they’re recommended for people with sensitive skin. The line also includes dish detergent and oxygen-powered powdered bleach. Find Country Save products on the company’s website and amazon.com.

 
<< Start < Prev 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 Next > End >>

Page 292 of 452