Governor Quinn Announces $30.5 Million for Community Health Centers Throughout Illinois PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Written by Katelyn Tye   
Thursday, 01 September 2011 07:57

Capital Funds Will Help Improve Health Care Access in Underserved Communities, Create Jobs

CHICAGO – August 31, 2011. Governor Pat Quinn today announced $30.5 million from the capital program to build and renovate 14 community health centers throughout Illinois. The Illinois Jobs Now! funding will help the state to improve health outcomes for medically underserved Illinoisans, reduce health care spending and save taxpayers money. The projects are expected to create around 215 jobs.

“These capital funds are critical in helping us increase community-based health care,” Governor Quinn said. “We are investing in the health and wellness of the people of Illinois, and these community health centers reflect the emphasis I have placed on helping people get the care they need as close to where they live and work as possible.”

The Community Health Center Construction Act, sponsored by Sen. James F. Clayborne Jr. (D-Belleville) and Rep. Sara Feigenholtz (D-Chicago), was signed into law by Governor Quinn in 2009. The Act enables communities to renovate dilapidated buildings, convert vacant commercial space, construct new health center sites, and provide equipment for additional health services such as OB/GYN and dental. 

Funding for the projects are included in Governor Quinn’s Illinois Jobs Now! capital construction program, and will be administered through the state’s Capital Development Board. In addition to providing needed health care facilities, the projects are expected to create about 215 construction jobs.

The 14 community health centers receiving grants include:

  • Erie Family Health Centers Inc.: $2.2 million to improve two existing primary care sites to serve Chicago’s greater Humboldt Park and West Town communities.
  • Lawndale Christian Health Center: $3 million to build a health and wellness center that will serve Lawndale and neighboring communities on Chicago’s west side.
  • Central Counties Health Centers: $3 million to build a 24,000-square-foot addition to its current facility that will serve Springfield and the surrounding area.
  • Rural Health Inc., Anna: $1.74 million to renovate existing space and build new space to serve Union and Johnson County residents.
  • Asian Human Services Family Health Center, Chicago: $2.18 million to build a new facility adjacent to its current West Ridge site.
  • Christian Community Health Center: $3 million to relocate its Calumet City Clinic.
  • Community Health Improvement Center, Champaign: $363,390 to remodel and expand existing space and purchase dental equipment.
  • Heartland International Health Center, Chicago: $3 million to build a health center in Rogers Park and renovate the Uptown Community Health Center.
  • Greater Elgin Family Care Center: $2.67 million to build a new Streamwood Health Center, expanding the existing Adult Clinic, and expanding the Sherman Hospital Medical Office.
  • Aunt Martha’s Service Center: $641,097 to renovate the Carpenters Health Center and the House Comprehensive Resource Center to serve the Carpentersville and Aurora areas.
  • Mercy Family Health Center: $3 million to build a new medical facility at Oakwood Shores Residential Community on Chicago’s near south side.
  • PCC Community Wellness Center: $691,299 to relocate and renovate its current facility that will serve Chicago’s western suburban communities.
  • Shawnee Health Service and Development Corporation, Carbondale: $1.9 million to build a new dental facility and renovate its existing building into medical exam rooms.
  • Alivio Medical Center, Berwyn: $3 million to build a new medical center with services for a wide variety of needs.

Community health centers are nonprofit entities created by Congress to meet the health care needs of underserved communities and high-risk patients. These centers fill a void by providing care for those who often are not served by other providers, including individuals who are low-income, the uninsured or homeless, or people with HIV/AIDS, substance abuse problems or special medical needs.

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