Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Oncologist: Meditation is Now Science-Approved Medicine PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Written by Ginny Grimsley   
Wednesday, 22 May 2013 07:29

Recent Scientific Research Documents Physiological Benefits

There have been countless anecdotal claims about the benefits of practicing meditation since the Eastern tradition has become more popular in the West. Now, there’s plenty of Western-based scientific evidence to support them, says Dr. Matt Mumber, a radiation oncologist and co-director of a non-profit integrative oncology program.

“Meditation is to the brain what physical activity is to the body. We’ve found meditation to be an important facet of health care, both for prevention and maintenance as well as in the treatment of disease, including cancer,” says Dr. Mumber, co-author with colleague and Yoga instructor Heather Reed of “Sustainable Wellness: An Integrative Approach to Transform Your Mind, Body, and Spirit,” (www.sustainablewellnessonline.com).

Mumber and Reed, who are co-facilitators of non-profit residential retreats for cancer patients, say one can experience sustainable wellness by developing a life practice grounded in the cultivation of awareness. This awareness is paying attention without attachment. The ability to be aware can be increased by a meditation tool called mindfulness.

“Life is a constant series of adjustments, matching your inner being with your outer doing,” Reed says. “One way to heighten your awareness is through practicing meditation.”

Mumber and Reed say there’s plenty of new evidence that the resulting sense of balance and peace is not just a psychological effect:

• Mindfulness meditation leads to increases in regional brain gray matter density: Recently published in Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, shows that measurable changes in gray-matter density in parts of the brain associated with memory, sense of self, empathy, and stress occurred with study participants who meditated for 30 minutes a day for eight weeks.

• Meditation practitioners have longer attention spans: Published by the journal PloS Biology, a study analyzed people with three months of rigorous training and found that they gained a drastically improved attention span – not only longer, but less susceptible to internal or external distraction. They also showed improved memory and enhanced performance in several tasks, from driving a car to playing piano.

• Reduces stress and blood pressure: Presented to the American Heart Association by researchers at the at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee and the Institute for Natural Medicine and Prevention, a study including 200 high-risk patients for heart attack found that meditation reduced their chances for heart attack by 50 percent.

“Studies involving people seeking to reduce stress and other problems in their lives via meditation will continue, as well as for those who want to enhance performance of various duties,” Mumber says.

“For those skeptical of the medical benefits of this Eastern practice, there’s now plenty of Western proof.”

About Matt Mumber, MD & Heather Reed

Matt Mumber, MD, is a practicing board-certified radiation oncologist with the Harbin Clinic in Rome, Ga. He completed his radiation oncology residency at Wake Forest University Bowman Gray School of Medicine and graduated from the Associate Fellowship Program in Integrative Medicine at the University of Arizona. Dr. Mumber is past president of the Georgia Society of Clinical Oncology. He founded Cancer Navigators Inc, a non-profit organization offering cancer patients access to nurse navigation, social services and educational programs to support and augment the clinical care they receive. Dr. Mumber received the Hamilton Jordan Founders Award for involvement in statewide oncology activities and in 2008 he was named a Health Care Hero by Georgia Trend magazine. He serves on the editorial board for the journals Current Oncology and Journal of Oncology Practice and is on the board for the Society of Integrative Oncology.

Heather Reed has been teaching Yoga since 1996. She expresses an integrative, adaptive approach and specializes in using Yoga and meditation techniques for people living with cancer, post-polio syndrome and other chronic illnesses. Heather received an Experienced Teacher Certification from Esther Myers Yoga Teacher Training Program and has had extensive training with senior staff of the Commonweal Cancer Help program and Dr. Dean Ornish’s Program for Reversing Heart Disease. She developed Yoga classes for cancer patients at The Wellness Community, Atlanta. Since 2008, she has been Yoga teacher and co-facilitator for the Residential Retreat Program for Cancer Navigators of Rome, Ga.

If you would like to run the above article, please feel free to do so. I am able to provide images if you would like some to accompany it. If you’re interested in interviewing Dr. Mumber/Heather or having them write an exclusive article for you, let me know and I’ll gladly work out details. Lastly, please let me know if you’d be interested in receiving a copy of their book, Sustainable Wellness, for possible review.

 
Protecting Your Smile and Your Baby PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Written by Mark McLaughlin   
Wednesday, 22 May 2013 07:14
BETTENDORF, IA – Pregnancy should be a time of great joy and contentment. But according to a Quad-Cities dentist, expectant mothers need to take into consideration a common health concern that can threaten the safety of an unborn child.
“During pregnancy, women are more prone to dental problems,” said Melinda Hochgesang, D.M.D. (pictured at right), of Byrum Family Dentistry. “It is important to treat these problems effectively. Left untreated, they can put you at an increased risk of pregnancy complications.” Byrum Family Dentistry, the dental practice of Robert L. Byrum, D.D.S., P.C., and Dr. Hochgesang, is located at 3878 Middle Road, Bettendorf, IA.
According to Dr. Hochgesang, dental problems that women may experience during pregnancy include pregnancy gingivitis, periodontal disease, and oral pregnancy tumors.

“Pregnancy gingivitis affects almost 50 percent of pregnant women,” Dr. Hochgesang said. “It can cause gums to become red, puffy, and inflamed.” Pregnancy gingivitis arises when bacteria grows unchecked between teeth and gums. “When you eat, food particles stick in the crevices between gums and teeth,” she said. “These particles attract and nourish bacteria, resulting in gum inflammation. Pregnant women are at greater risk because their higher levels of progesterone and estrogen lead to increased blood flow through the body and in the gums.”
Untreated, gingivitis can lead to periodontal disease, also known as gum disease. “This severe gum infection can destroy the bones and fibers that keep teeth in place,” Dr. Hochgesang said. “Periodontal gum disease can cause bleeding gums, tooth loss, and infection. Periodontal disease is a major concern during pregnancy, since it can lead to increased risks of both pre-term labor and the delivery of a low birth-weight baby.”
Oral pregnancy tumors – also known as pyogenic granulomas – can form when you suffer from pregnancy gingivitis or periodontal disease. “These tumors are growths that form on your gums,” she stated. “They can make it hard to speak, eat, and swallow, and may cause pain or discomfort. If necessary, these tumors can be removed by your dentist.”
Proper Dental Care

According to Dr. Hochgesang, proper dental care during pregnancy is vital. Regular dental checkups, along with oral hygiene practices at home, can keep teeth and gums free of tartar and plaque.
“Be sure to visit your dentist at least once during your pregnancy for a regular cleaning and routine dental checkup,” she said. “Usually, dental appointments are made during the second trimester, after your baby has formed vital organs.” While regular cleanings are not harmful during the first or third trimesters, she noted, having cleanings during the second trimester can reduce possible risks to your baby.
If you experience toothaches during your pregnancy, or notice blood or pus around the gum line, you should visit your dentist. “These are signs of infection, which can be dangerous during pregnancy,” Dr. Hochgesang said. “Oral infections can spread through your body, increasing the risks of pregnancy complications, such as miscarriage.”
Broken teeth, cavities, or other dental emergencies should be checked by your dentist. However, treatment may be delayed until after your baby’s birth, to avoid complications. “If you are in considerable pain, or the problem can be solved quickly and easily, your dentist may decide to give you treatment during your pregnancy,” she said. “Even so, be sure to talk with your pre-natal health care provider before undergoing any dental treatments.”
Dr. Hochgesang stressed that certain treatments should be delayed until after you’ve given birth to your child. “Teeth whitening and other cosmetic procedures should be held off,” she said. “If possible, postpone non-emergency dental work until the second trimester or until after delivery. Exposure to x-rays should be avoided unless absolutely necessary. Any procedure requiring you to sit for long periods also should be avoided. Sitting in the dentist’s chair for a long time can put pressure on a major blood vessel and may cause fainting.”
Helpful Tips

The best way to foster healthy teeth and gums during pregnancy is to follow a daily dental care regimen. Dr. Hochgesang offers these helpful tips to help keep your smile happy and healthy:
  • The American Dental Association (ADA) recommends that pregnant women eat a balanced diet, brush thoroughly with an ADA-approved fluoride toothpaste twice a day, and floss daily.
  • Get plenty of calcium, vitamin B12 and vitamin C. These vitamins help build healthy gums and teeth.
  • Switch toothpastes if yours triggers nausea. Rinse your mouth with warm water or an antibacterial mouthwash if you suffer from vomiting and morning sickness.
  • Avoid eating too many sugary foods. They can cause plaque and tartar buildup.
  • Be sure your dentist knows you are pregnant.
  • Maintain healthy circulation by keeping your legs uncrossed as you sit in the dentist’s chair.
  • Bring a pillow to your visit with the dentist, to help keep you and the baby more comfortable. You can also bring headphones and some favorite music.
To find out more about Byrum Family Dentistry, call (563) 332-7734 or visit ByrumFamilyDentistry.com.
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Two more donors: Red Cross launches Summer of Stories blood donor campaign PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Written by Ben Corey   
Tuesday, 21 May 2013 12:34
PEORIA, Ill. (May 20, 2013) — The American Red Cross is launching the Summer of Stories campaign to share the personal impact blood and platelet donors can have on a patient in need and to help ensure a sufficient blood supply is available in the months ahead.

Summer is a time for the days that never end. Time for diving in and grilling out. Time to watch the fireworks, to have a picnic, to root for the home team. While many have fun making these memories, hospital patients are counting on eligible donors to make time to give blood or platelets so they can continue making and sharing their own summer memories and stories.

“Stories are the glue that bind many of us together,” said Shelly Heiden, CEO of the Heart of America Services Region. “Whether you’ve needed blood, have given blood or simply want to share a fun summer memory, we want to hear from you.”

The Red Cross asks all eligible blood and platelet donors to join its Summer of Stories campaign, which kicks off May 23 and runs through Sept. 9. Through Summer of Stories, the organization hopes to encourage at least two more donors to give blood at every Red Cross blood drive this summer — above what’s expected — to help ensure lifesaving blood products are available at a moment’s notice.

Historically, during the summer months of June, July and August, about two fewer donors give blood at each Red Cross blood drive than what patients need. But, this seasonal challenge can be overcome two generous donors at a time, at every blood drive, every day. Individuals can visit redcrossblood.org/summer to make an appointment to donate and share their donation story.

To kick off Summer of Stories and encourage donations before and after the Memorial Day holiday, all presenting blood donors between May 23 and 31 could win one of five $1,000 American Express gift cards to help create their own summer of stories.

Live a story. Give a story. Donate blood or platelets. Call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or visit redcrossblood.org/summer for more information and to make an appointment to help save lives.

Upcoming blood donation opportunities:

Clinton County

May 24 from 12-6 p.m. at Wild Rose Casino & Resort, 777 Wild Rose Drive in Clinton, Iowa

May 28 from 3-6 p.m. at Clinton Church of Christ, 210 N. 13th St. in Clinton, Iowa

June 5 from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Central High School, 519 E. 11th St. in De Witt, Iowa


Henry County

May 22 from 2-6 p.m. at First Christian Church, 105 Dwight St. in Kewanee, Ill.

May 28 from 1-6 p.m. at First United Methodist Church, 214 NW Second Ave. in Galva, Ill.

June 6 from 2-6 p.m. at American Legion, 509 N. School St. in Atkinson, Ill.

June 12 from 2-6 p.m. at First Christian Church, 105 Dwight St. in Kewanee, Ill.

June 12 from 2-6 p.m. at St. Paul Lutheran Church, 1001 Ninth St. in Orion, Ill.


Mercer County

May 21 from 11:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. at VFW Hall, 106 SW Third Ave. in Aledo, Ill.

May 22 from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Mercer County Hospital, 409 NW Ninth Ave. in Aledo, Ill.

June 11 from 2-6 p.m. at New Windsor Presbyterian Church, Fourth and Walnut in New Windsor, Ill.


Rock Island County

June 5 from 1-6 p.m. at American Red Cross Quad Cities, 1100 River Drive in Moline, Ill.


Whiteside County

May 21 from 1-5:15 p.m. at River Bend Senior Center, 912 Fourth St. in Fulton, Ill.

May 21 from 12-6 p.m. at United Methodist Church, 200 W. Lincolnway in Morrison, Ill.

May 22 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Rock Falls Blood Donation Center, 112 W. Second St. in Rock Falls, Ill.

May 25 from 7-11 a.m. at Rock Falls Blood Donation Center, 112 W. Second St. in Rock Falls, Ill.

May 28 from 1-5:15 p.m. at River Bend Senior Center, 912 Fourth St. in Fulton, Ill.

May 29 from 2-6 p.m. at Rock Falls Blood Donation Center, 112 W. Second St. in Rock Falls, Ill.

June 4 from 8-11 a.m. at River Bend Senior Center, 912 Fourth St. in Fulton, Ill.

June 5 from 2-6 p.m. at American Red Cross, 112 W. Second St. in Rock Falls, Ill.

June 6 from 9:45 a.m. to 4 p.m. at CGH Medical Center, 100 E. LeFevre Road in Sterling, Ill.

June 10 from 11:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. at Prophetstown-Lyndon-Tampico CUSD 3, 79 Grove St. in Prophetstown, Ill.

June 11 from 1-5:15 p.m. at River Bend Senior Center, 912 Fourth St. in Fulton, Ill.

June 12 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at American Red Cross, 112 W. Second St. in Rock Falls, Ill.


How to donate blood

Simply call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or visit redcrossblood.org to make an appointment or for more information. All blood types are needed to ensure a reliable supply for patients. A blood donor card or driver’s license or two other forms of identification are required at check-in. Individuals who are 17 years of age (16 with parental consent in some states), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally good health may be eligible to donate blood. High school students and other donors 18 years of age and younger also have to meet certain height and weight requirements.

About the American Red Cross

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters;  supplies about 40 percent of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or join our blog at http://blog.redcross.org.

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FDA APPROVES NEW TREATMENT FOR ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER PATIENTS PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Written by Zero - the end of prostate cancer   
Monday, 20 May 2013 14:21

The FDA has approved Bayer and Algeta's drug Xofigo (radium Ra 223 dichloride, formerly known as alpharadin) to treat men with symptomatic late-stage (metastatic) castration-resistant prostate cancer that has spread to bones but not to other organs. It is intended for men whose cancer has spread after receiving medical or surgical therapy to lower testosterone.

Xofigo binds with minerals in the bone to deliver radiation directly to bone tumors, limiting the damage to the surrounding normal tissues. It is the second prostate cancer drug approved by the FDA in the past year that demonstrates an ability to extend the survival of men with metastatic prostate cancer.

Patients who are interested in finding out where and when newly FDA approved drug Xofigo will be available can call 1-855-696-3446 (1-855-6Xofigo) or visit the website www.xofigo.com.

 
Upcoming Red Cross blood drives: June 1-15 PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Written by Ben Corey   
Wednesday, 15 May 2013 14:15

PEORIA, Ill. (May 15, 2013) — No matter the season, the need for blood is constant. Every two seconds someone in the U.S. needs a transfusion, and around 44,000 pints of blood must be donated every day to meet patient needs.

To emphasize the importance of giving blood year-round, and timed with World Blood Donor Day on June 14, the American Red Cross encourages those eligible to become regular donors, especially during the summer.

Summer is a challenging time to collect enough blood donations to meet patient needs. If at least two more donors give blood at every Red Cross blood drive this summer — above what’s expected — it will help ensure blood is available for patients at a moment’s notice.

A stable blood supply is vital for treating trauma victims, cancer patients, organ transplant recipients, premature babies, sickle cell disease patients and many others.

To learn more and make an appointment to donate blood, visit redcrossblood.org or call 1-800-RED CROSS.

Upcoming blood donation opportunities:

Clinton County

June 5 from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Central High School, 519 E. 11th St. in De Witt, Iowa

Henry County

June 6 from 2-6 p.m. at American Legion, 509 N. School St. in Atkinson, Ill.

June 12 from 2-6 p.m. at First Christian Church, 105 Dwight St. in Kewanee, Ill.

June 12 from 2-6 p.m. at St. Paul Lutheran Church, 1001 Ninth St. in Orion, Ill.

Mercer County

June 11 from 2-6 p.m. at New Windsor Presbyterian Church, Fourth and Walnut in New Windsor, Ill.

Rock Island County

June 5 from 1-6 p.m. at American Red Cross Quad Cities, 1100 River Drive in Moline, Ill.

Whiteside County

June 4 from 8-11 a.m. at River Bend Senior Center, 912 Fourth St. in Fulton, Ill.

June 5 from 2-6 p.m. at American Red Cross, 112 W. Second St. in Rock Falls, Ill.

June 6 from 9:45 a.m. to 4 p.m. at CGH Medical Center, 100 E. LeFevre Road in Sterling, Ill.

June 10 from 11:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. at Prophetstown-Lyndon-Tampico CUSD 3, 79 Grove St. in  Prophetstown, Ill.

June 11 from 1-5:15 p.m. at River Bend Senior Center, 912 Fourth St. in Fulton, Ill.

June 12 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at American Red Cross, 112 W. Second St. in Rock Falls, Ill.

The need is constant. The gratification is instant. Give blood.™

How to donate blood

Simply call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or visit redcrossblood.org to make an  appointment or for more information. All blood types are needed to ensure a reliable supply for patients. A blood donor card or driver’s license or two other forms of identification are required at check-in. Individuals who are 17 years of age (16 with parental consent in some states), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally good health may be eligible to donate blood. High school students and other donors 18 years of age and younger also have to meet certain height and weight requirements.

About the American Red Cross

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or join our blog at http://blog.redcross.org.

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