Health, Medicine & Nutrition
New Eye Exam Camera for the Quad Cites children PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Written by M. McNeil   
Friday, 30 November 2012 15:46
The Early Childhood Coalition is hoping the generous Holiday spirit in the Quad Cities will help the group get a new digital eye exam machine this fall

(Moline, IL)  The Early Childhood Coalition (ECC) has been coordinating efforts to offer monthly free Early Learning Screenings for children 4 months to age five at various locations throughout Rock Island County for years.  The group also has spent a decade offering vision, hearing and overall developmental screenings.  Now it wants to make the screenings more effective and quicker.  This can be done with a new digital vision camera called the “Spot”, manufactured by Pediavision.

The Secretary of the ECC, Lisa Viaene, says the current camera the group is using, the ‘Photo Screener’ is becoming obsolete and the film is no longer being produced.  Viaene says the new camera will cost almost eight thousand dollars and she is reaching out to the community for assistance in securing the funds.   Since the group began their monthly screenings in September of 2002 more than 2,200 children have been screened.  Viaene says with the new camera thousands more children will be served.  She says when vision problems are found early children will be more successful throughout their lives.

 
New Guide,‘5 Simple Steps,’ Helps Readers Make Wiser Choices PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Written by Ginny Grimsley   
Tuesday, 27 November 2012 12:43
Life Coach W. Granville Brown Says Taking Time for Thought,
Taking Responsibility, and Being Honest with One’s Self Are
Crucial for Making Good Choices

Life is filled with confusing options and competing interests, which is why W. Granville Brown wrote his new guide, 5 Simple Steps to Choosing Your Path (www.wgranvillebrown.com).

“For better or for worse, your life is shaped by your choices and decisions, and knowing the difference between the two helps tremendously in organizing your will,” Brown says. “There is a distinction between the two that goes far beyond semantics.”

A choice, generally speaking, is a selection from a number of options, and a decision entails reaching a conclusion or passing judgment on an issue, he says.

Why is this important to understand as we navigate our lives?

Brown gives an example:

“A friend of mine loved the year-round sunshine of Las Vegas, where she worked. But she always complained about being unable to break through the glass ceiling at her job,” Brown says. “Finally, her company offered her a promotion: managing its new branch in Boston. Although this seems like a no-brainer – whether to grow with a great career in an exciting new city, or stay safe in Vegas – she clouded her mind as if she had multiple choices.”

If Lisa had equally attractive career options in Miami and Philadelphia in addition to the Boston offer, she would be faced with choices. But actually, the options were between the safety and comfort of what she knew versus the unknowable future of a great opportunity. Her dilemma begged a decision.

Much of the time, however, we face choices, Brown notes. Does the teenager choose to adhere to his curfew or violate it? Does the adult choose to spend all of his earnings or save part of them?

“Once you recognize the choices in your life, you can think each one through and make the one that is right for you,” Brown says. “That’s Step. 1. You’ll also need to recognize that, since it is your choice, you must deal with the consequences. You must accept responsibility for those choices.”

Brown’s guide walks readers through his five steps using illustrative anecdotes to clarify points. The result is a how-to for anyone seeking to take control of their life.

“When I applied W. Granville Brown’s five simple steps, I went from working at a dead-end job to going back to school and getting my degree in accounting,” writes reviewer Donna from Kinston, N.C.

Arthur, from Philadelphia, writes: “You’re never too old to grow and learn. At 63, I’ve struggled with making wise choices my entire life. After counseling with Brown and applying his methods, I have a renewed lease on life.”

About W. Granville Brown

After serving in the U.S. Army and earning his degree in business administration, W. Granville Brown embarked on a successful career in the insurance industry spanning two decades. He later became committed to improving the lives of others by encouraging inward reflection, and became a bestselling, self-published author. As a certified life coach, Brown has helped many clients transform their lives for the better by using real-world methods.

 
Ouchies Announces a Design-Your-Own Bandage Contest To Help in the Fight against Pediatric Cancer PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Written by Lindsay Doyle   
Tuesday, 27 November 2012 12:39

CAN A BANDAGE CURE CANCER? YOURS CAN!

New York, November 2012 – Bandages are known for bringing comfort, healing and smiles to children with cuts and scrapes.  Now, thanks to a new program being launched by Ouchies Bandages, bandages may also bring something much more to the many children affected by pediatric cancer – through a new contest designed to raise money for three national pediatric cancer organizations.

As part of its “Ouchies for Others” program, Ouchies Bandages has just announced a new Bandage Art contest to help raise money in the fight against pediatric cancer.  The contest gives kids the chance to design their own Ouchies bandages and tell their own story about the fight against pediatric cancer or anything else uplifting - with the chance to have their designs featured in the new “Ouchies for Others” bandages and tin to be released in 2013.

The “Ouchies for Others” Bandage Art Contest is open to kids 18 and younger.  To participate in the contest, a design template and further instructions for submitting entries can be found at www.ouchiesonline.com/bandage-art-contest.  All entries will be displayed on Ouchies’ Facebook page, where fans will vote for their favorite entries by “liking” the bandage designs.  10 finalists will be chosen, and five winners will have their designs featured on the new "Ouchies for Others" bandages and tin, which will be released in 2013.  The deadline for entries is January 25th.

Through the “Ouchies for Others” program, Ouchies gives 100% of profits to varied not-for-profit organizations – with all profits from the sale of these new bandages going to three national pediatric cancer organizations. Earlier this year, Ouchies launched its first “Ouchies for Others” program designed to help combat bullying.

“This line of bandages is all about inspiring kids to help other kids and what better of a way than to let kids design the bandages themselves?” says Ian Madover, President of Ouchies.  “What makes it all even better is that 100% of the profits from the sale of these bandages will benefit such important organizations in the fight against pediatric cancer, with this program raising money for  the Childhood Leukemia Foundation, Cookies for Kids' Cancer, and the American Childhood Cancer Organization®.”

According to the National Cancer Institute, on average, 1 to 2 children out of every 10,000 in the United States develop cancer each year.  What’s really special about the Ouchies Bandage Art Contest is that everyone wins in the fight against Pediatric Cancer – with children having the opportunity to help others while participating in this unique contest, and money being raised for such an important cause.

"The contest is designed to raise awareness about this disease and to raise the money to help find a cure,” says Jennifer Saporta, Director of Sales & Marketing at Ouchies. “If the Bandage Art Contest can put a smile on one face or allow a kid to tell his/her story through a bandage design, Ouchies has made a difference.”

The Childhood Leukemia Foundation, Cookies for Kids’ Cancer, and the American Childhood Cancer Organization® will be promoting the contest on their web sites. According to Kim Wetmore, Director at the Childhood Leukemia Foundation, “Last year more than 12,000 children were diagnosed with pediatric cancer. Childhood Leukemia Foundation (CLF) is dedicated to making a difference in lives of these children. CLF is honored to partner with Ouchies Bandages to work together raising awareness and bringing smiles to many little faces.”

Ouchies asks, “Can a Bandage Help to Cure Cancer?” and answers emphatically, “Yours can!”

For more information on Ouchies for Others and the Bandage Art Contest, visit

www.ouchiesonline.com.

 
AD RescueWear Has Received the National Eczema Association Seal of Acceptance. PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Written by Anne Fairchild McVey   
Monday, 26 November 2012 15:37
AD RescueWear is proud to announce they have received the National Eczema Association Seal of Acceptance.

Products eligible for the National Eczema Association Seal of Acceptance are those that have been created or intended for use by persons with eczema or severe sensitive skin conditions and that have satisfied the NEA Seal of Acceptance Criteria. The following product categories are included: Personal Care Products, Household Products, Fabrics, and Devices. The Seal of Acceptance criteria includes a list of ingredients and contents that should be avoided because they contain known irritants. Depending on the product, the NEA Seal of Acceptance Review Panel considers testing data on sensitivity, safety, and toxicity, as well as the ingredients, content, and formulation data. Acceptance of a product means that the product has been evaluated to determine that it does not contain ingredients or contents that are known to be unsuitable for use by persons with eczema or sensitive skin conditions. For more information on the National Eczema Association and its Seal of Acceptance please visit www.nationaleczema.org.

AD RescueWear is the first U.S. Company to manufacture and sell ready-made, wet wrap therapy products for the treatment of childhood Atopic Dermatitis/Eczema. The product line includes the Wrap-E-SootheTM Suit for full body treatment and Wrap-E-SootheTM Sleeves for treating arms and legs. The Wrap-E-SootheTM products were developed by AD RescueWear in consultation with leading allergists. The Wrap-E-SootheTM products are made with eco-friendly MicroTENCEL®/lyocell fabric which is proven through verifiable testing to be superior for Atopic Dermatitis/Eczema and sensitive skin. TENCEL® fabric is Oeko-Tex Standard 100 certified (tested for harmful substances and free of hazardous chemicals).

These new garments are a breakthrough for parents, doctors and nurses who struggle with wet wrapping children with Atopic Dermatitis/Eczema. The revolutionary design simplifies the full body and spot treatment of Atopic Dermatitis/Eczema. The Wrap-E-SootheTM Suit and Sleeves replace the traditional treatment of using wetted gauze, shirts, pants, multiple pairs of socks and duct tape for fastening. Instead of the traditional time consuming and sometimes confusing process, the caregiver just wets the suit or sleeves and slips them onto the child.

The Wrap-E-SootheTM products can also be worn dry to protect irritated or healing skin. The ultra soft and smooth fabric is a great protection layer under clothing or as clothing. These products are reusable and machine washable.

If you would like more information about this topic please call 303-953-4137.

# # #

 
Lt. Governor Simon, EMS Task Force make recommendations to improve emergency medical services PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Written by Kara Beach   
Monday, 26 November 2012 14:20

Increased access to education would improve provider training

 

SPRINGFIELD – November 20, 2012. Lt. Governor Sheila Simon joined state Rep. Don Moffitt (R-Gilson) and state Rep. Lisa Dugan (D-Bradley) today to issue recommendations that will help improve rural emergency medical services. The recommendations were generated after 17 hearings of the Illinois House of Representatives’ Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Task Force were held last year.

“During an emergency, every second counts,” Simon said. “Rural Illinois residents may travel up to 30 miles or more to reach the appropriate hospital. It is important that emergency medical technicians and paramedics who are treating patients during long transports are well-trained and have access to the best technology. I would like to thank the Task Force members for their hard work as we move forward with implementing some of these recommendations.”

Lt. Governor Simon testified in Galesburg in favor of increasing the availability of high-quality online training for EMTs and paramedics to improve employee and volunteer retention. Emergency medical service providers are required to complete 120 hours of continuing education every four years to renew their license. Currently, only 25 percent of that can be completed online, but the Task Force agreed with Simon that the offering should be increased. The Task Force also recommended that evaluation of that training should be based on performance, rather than only the hours completed.

“While the work of this current Task Force has been completed, the job is not finished. As our communities continue to grow and change and technology continues to advance we must continue to reach out to local emergency responders to make sure they have the tools they need to keep local families safe,” Moffitt said.

“It was an enlightening and enjoyable experience working with EMS personnel throughout the state of Illinois and Rep. Moffitt. I look with anticipation to the state moving forward to recognize and address the EMS needs throughout this state, so they can continue to provide a valuable service for the people of the state of Illinois,” Dugan said.

The Task Force also discussed the implementation of new federal EMS educational standards so that emergency medical technicians who have obtained licenses in Illinois are able to use them in other states. Additionally, the recommendations included a proposal to simplify licensing for ambulances. Rather than renewing licenses annually, if implemented, providers could obtain licenses lasting two to four years contingent on annual state inspections.

Lt. Governor Simon is the chair of the Governor’s Rural Affairs Council. Enhancing EMS is a part of the council’s strategic plan for rural Illinois.

###

 
<< Start < Prev 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 Next > End >>

Page 98 of 196