Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Main at Locust Pharmacy and Medical Supplies Health Clinic Event PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Written by Main at Locust Pharmacy   
Wednesday, 30 April 2014 09:09

Free Facial Analysis - May 6th - 10 a.m. until 1 p.m.

Summer is coming! Protect your skin by coming to the FREE Dermaview Facial Analysis at Main at Locust Pharmacy on Tuesday, May 6th from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m.  The Dermaview System analyzes your skin and areas of sun damage and identifies areas which are dry, oily, or dehydrated.  In addition, it detects areas that have clogged pores, thick or sensitive skin or areas which are prone to bacterial infection.

For more information, please contact Shersten at 563-324-1641.

 
Choosing an Assisted Living Home PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Written by Ginny Grimsley   
Tuesday, 29 April 2014 12:37

3 Tips for Choosing an Assisted-Living Home for Your Parent
Expert Also Shares the Biggest Mistake You Can Make

Seventy percent of people age 65 and older will need long-term care at some point in their lives, according to a 2014 study by CareScout, a division of Genworth Financial Services.

“But that doesn’t mean they have to sacrifice their quality of life,” says Peder Johnsen, CEO of Concordis Senior Living, www.concordisseniorliving.com, which owns, operates and develops senior housing communities.

“In fact, a person who needs some assistance with day-to-day living will often find he or she is much happier in a good assisted-living community with an atmosphere that reminds them of their former home.”

And it doesn’t have to be outrageously priced, notes Johnsen, a third-generation ALF operator whose family pioneered the contemporary congregate community model.

The median price for a private, one-bed home in an ALF community is $42,000, he says, citing the CareScout report. By contrast, a semi-private nursing home bed costs a median $77,000 a year.

But it’s up to prospective residents and their families to ascertain the quality of the community and whether it’s a good match for the person who will be living there.

“ALFs are not federally regulated and states vary widely on the breadth of oversight they provide, so you can’t necessarily rely on the law,” Johnsen says. “And don’t rely on salespeople either – that’s the biggest mistake people make.”

There are, however, a number of easy ways to see if a home has a truly caring atmosphere and well-trained staff.

Johnsen offers these tips:

•  Ask to see the home’s state licensing survey, an assessment that usually includes inspections, audits, interviews with residents, etc.

Every state has an ALF licensing agency and all have some form of survey system for ensuring that certain standards of quality are met, according to the Assisted Living Federation of America.

“Requirements vary from state to state about how often the surveys are conducted and how the public can access the reports, but no matter what state you live in, you should be able to ask the ALF for its most recent report, or obtain it from the licensing agency,” Johnsen says.

The surveys will tell you if problems were found – or not – and what the ALF did to address them.

•  Visit the ALF during non-business hours.

Go before breakfast or after dinner – times when the administrators aren’t around. What’s the atmosphere? How do employees behave with the residents?

“That’s a good time to talk to residents, too,” Johnsen says.

Be a “mystery shopper,” he suggests. Pretend you’re just visiting the community – not scouting it out as a prospective customer.

•  Ascertain how truly “homelike” the community is.

In your own home, if you don’t feel like eating breakfast at 7:30 a.m., you don’t have to. You can have breakfast at 10. You can get snacks when you want them.

“Depending on what’s important to your loved one, there are potentially many rules that can affect how ‘at home’ a person feels,” Johnsen says. “Some communities allow residents to have pets, others don’t. Some provide lots of activities. At some, residents can quickly and easily arrange for transportation or a service like hair styling.”

Not every community can offer everything, he notes. That’s why it’s important to look for those features that are especially important to your loved one.

About Peder Johnsen

Peder Johnsen is the CEO of Concordis Senior Living, www.concordisseniorliving.com, which owns, operates and develops senior housing communities. He’s a third-generation assisted-living specialist whose grandfather and father built one of the first contemporary-style ALFs in Florida more than 30 years ago. Johnsen took over administration of two small facilities at age 18. Today, he specializes the full spectrum of ALFs – from “ALF lites,” where most residents live very independent lifestyles but know assisted-living services are available if they should need them, to homes specializing in care for residents with Alzheimer’s and dementia. He is an industry leader in staff development and training, and has overseen the development, acquisition and financing of several communities.

 
Are You Sick and Tired of Being Sick and Tired? PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Written by Ginny Grimsley   
Monday, 28 April 2014 09:47
3 Questions Chronic Pain Sufferers Should Ask Themselves

The numbers involved in America’s problem with chronic pain are staggering and probably larger than most realize.

More than 100 million Americans suffer from chronic pain, costing nearly $600 billion annually in medical treatments and lost productivity, according to the Institute of Medicine, which adds that the total surpasses that of all people affected by heart disease, diabetes and cancer combined.

“Despite the immense scope of the problem, very little is spent on research to find better ways to manage pain. Chronic pain has become a disease in its own right for many patients,” says Komanchuk, a retired schoolteacher who now works as an educational writer and public relations assistant with Joy of Healing, an alternative healing modality.

Komanchuk, a fibromyalgia sufferer, was dealing with so much pain in her life that, at age 52, she was faced with the prospect of spending the rest of her life in a nursing home. Fibromyalgia syndrome is a complex, chronic condition of widespread muscular pain and fatigue, that often includes sleep disturbances, impaired memory and concentration, depression and other debilitating symptoms.

“When medical leave, morphine patches, codeine and myriad pharmaceuticals brought no relief, I took an early retirement and tried a different approach in combination with medical treatment,” says Komanchuk, who has since enjoyed more than 13 years of pain-free and prescription-free living after finding an alternative healing therapy that works for her.

Komanchuk, who elaborates on her path to mind-body-spirit wellness at www.jkomanchuk.com, says chronic pain sufferers who cannot find lasting relief should ask themselves the following three questions:

•  Have I really tried everything? Komanchuk had been to orthopedic surgeons, neurologists, rheumatologists, psychologists, underwent MRIs and took all manner of medications for her unbearable pain. In a narrow sense, it would seem as though she exhausted her options – until she looked beyond traditional Western medicine. Alternative treatment guided her to recognize the layers of stress throughout her life that she believes were a primary driver of her chronic pain.

•  Am I overlooking dietary triggers? The medical community continues to learn more about the benefits of healthy eating and specific diets for people with certain conditions, such as a gluten-free diet for those with sensitivities to gluten. Likewise, it can take years for someone to realize that they are lactose-intolerant, or have other food allergies. If you can’t pinpoint the source of chronic pain, and no treatment is working, find out what is healthy for your body. “Eliminating wheat, sugar and many processed foods helped me,” Komanchuk says.

•  Are your mind, body and spirit in balance? Komanchuk thought she was living the life she was supposed to live, accumulating wealth and possessions, and she had a narrowly defined expectation of others. In reality, however, the priorities guiding her well-being, which are based in the mind, body and spirit, were skewed. Underneath someone’s physical experience, pain, she says, is often a caldron of unresolved emotional issues.

“At the height of my suffering I often said, ‘If every part of my body that hurt was bleeding, then you could begin to understand what I was feeling,’ ” says Komanchuk. “I just want to urge the millions who are struggling with chronic pain to never give up – and, to keep an open mind for treatment!”

About Janet Komanchuk

Janet Komanchuk, www.jkomanchuk.com, is a retired schoolteacher who has experienced the miraculous remission of chronic, debilitating fibromyalgia, which was the result of many overlapping stressors and unresolved issues throughout her life. While weathering extreme fatigue and pain, she’d tried everything from traditional Western medicine to alcohol consumption and various holistic treatments. It wasn’t until she experienced the healing work of medium and healer Andrew Overlee, and his wife, Tamara, a dedicated spiritual counselor and author, that she was able to regain her life. She is now pain-free without any use of prescription medication. She is an educational writer and public relations assistant with Joy of Healing, Inc., in Valrico, Fla.

 
Loebsack Announces More Than $2.1 Million for Community Health Care in Davenport PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Written by Vonnie Hampel   
Wednesday, 23 April 2014 15:03

Washington, D.C. - Congressman Dave Loebsack announced today Community Health Care in Davenport received a $2,159,101 grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

“Doctors in Iowa are second to none in the quality of health care they provide and community health centers play a vital role in providing access to care,” said Loebsack. “These funds will help ensure the health professionals at Community Health Care can continue to offer the highest quality of care. I am excited to see the improvements that will be made in Davenport.”

Loebsack has been a longtime supporter of Community Health Centers and has visited Community Health Care multiple times.

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Facts about Sugar and Skin PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Written by Ginny Grimsley   
Wednesday, 23 April 2014 09:39

Sugar: The Secret Skin Assassin!
The Good, The Bad and the Ugly of a Favorite Food Pastime
By: Ron Cummings

The Good

Wow, we sure like our sugar. After all, what’s not to like? I mean, what’s better with a glass of milk than a couple of chocolate chip cookies? Imagine that it’s the end of a long, hard day; you get home and put on your favorite TV show, kick your feet up and dig in to a bowl of your favorite ice cream covered in an assortment of decadent toppings.  And, for millions of us, that mid-day candy bar is just a regular part of life. Let’s face it – our favorite sugar-laden goodies are just flat out pleasing, comforting and of course delicious! Sugar satisfies one of our favorite desires: instant gratification. We love sugar; we crave it. It’s just plain good.

The Bad

With that being said, there’s not a single one of us who doesn’t know that sugar, especially in excess, is bad for us. It’s terrible for our teeth, destroys our mood, makes us gain weight and severely alters our overall blood chemistry. We have to admit that sugar simply ruins our health. Naturally, we continue to indulge our sugar obsession, despite the detrimental consequences of eating sugar. We can all agree life is too short not to enjoy our favorite dessert, right? – Lots of things are bad for us, so what’s the big deal?  If enjoying sugar means an extra few pounds around my midsection, then I guess that’s okay, right?

Some of us think that, maybe, if I just watch my sugar intake a little and not go too crazy, then I’ll be able to enjoy the good of sugar and, maybe, the bad of sugar won’t really affect me too much. When it comes to sugar, most of us are willing to take the good with the bad, because we want to have our cake and eat it too.

By now, most of us have been bombarded by endless antisugar messages. There are always new studies on how sugar adversely affects our health, our kids’ attention spans, and the obesity problem that seems to be getting worse by the year.  No matter what anti-sugar messages we read, see and hear, we simply refuse to give up our beloved sugar.

However, there is a new and powerful message coming out from the scientific community about sugar, and whether it’s time for us to give it up.

The Ugly

Sugar is making you ugly! What? – Yes! Excess sugar in our bodies is now being revealed as one of the most damaging elements to our appearance. As it turns out, these sweet little sugar molecules are leading a double life. After they pass over our taste buds and give us that amazing sugar buzz, these appealing friends of ours change their personalities and go on a seek-and-destroy mission. In a process called glycation, excess sugar in our blood stream in reality attacks the proteins throughout our bodies. As a matter of fact, these sugar molecules attach themselves to proteins – much like a parasite. Once bonding happens, that particular protein becomes glycated; or, in other words, sick.

A recently glycated protein becomes misshapen, hardened, does not function correctly and excretes exotoxins that affect surrounding proteins. After the glycation process has run its course, the protein is referred to as an Advanced Glycation End Product, or A.G.E. for short.

A real-world example of glycation in action is the browning and hardening process when placing a piece of bread in the toaster.

This is where the ugly part comes in. Our skin is essentially one giant protein suit that covers us and protects all of our inner workings from the outside world. Most people are aware that the main protein in human skin is collagen, the proteins of which are very long lasting. They have a half-life of approximately 15 years and are not immune to the effects of glycation. Just like other proteins, when collagen becomes glycated, that protein is now considered an A.G.E. Like others, collagen proteins become misshapen, hardened, brittle and excrete exotoxins. While you can’t see the effects of most proteins in your body when they become glycated, the effects of glycation on skin proteins becomes very evident.

Essentially, every visible sign we attribute to aging skin – including wrinkles, fine lines, discoloration, sagging, uneven skin tones, stress, loss of elasticity, etc. – can all be attributed to the process of glycation.

Glycation becomes more evident in your appearance when sugar molecules attack the surface proteins on the fine capillaries of your skin. This process causes your capillaries to leak, causing what we recognize as spider veins. The same process can happen in the under-eye area, which we recognize as dark circles.

The most demoralizing aspect of glycation is the fact that once a protein has become glycated, or is now considered an A.G.E., the damage is permanent. Glycation is an additive effect and probably begins as soon as we’re born, affecting us throughout our lifetime.

If you’ve read or have been told that environmental factors like the sun, wind, weather and pollution age our skin the most, that would be correct, but it’s not the whole story.  Glycation is the chemical process which enables these environmental factors to damage our skin. For instance, when radiation from the sun strikes and penetrates our skin, it accelerates the glycation process. (Recall my mention of toasting a piece of bread.)

It seems a little unfair. In most cases, if I give up a certain vice, then my body, given enough time, will generally recover. If I start eating a better diet, I’ll most likely lose weight and be healthier. If I give up smoking, in most cases, my lungs, heart and blood pressure can return to normal. Nevertheless, once your proteins have been glycated, you’re pretty much out of luck; the damage has been done – end of story.

Well … almost. You see, if you go online right now and do a search on the process of glycation, you will read much of what you’ve read here, including the fact that once a protein has become an A.G.E., it’s irreversible. Recent studies have shown some promising discoveries that may allow us to not only help prevent further damage from glycation, but also help affected proteins return to their normal state, function and appearance!

Powerful, new and topically applied serums have shown the remarkable ability to help block the glycation process and break the bond between the sugar molecules and the protein affected. In a recent clinical trial conducted in France, 500 women were treated with a serum derived from a naturally occurring plant extract. At the end of the 60-day trial, the 500 women appeared an average of 8 to 10 years younger.

No doubt that a whole new category of anti-glycation treatments will soon be available in the marketplace. Based on projections, anti-glycation products will become as popular as the anti-oxidants, sunscreens and moisturizers of today.

For a detailed description of how glycation ages your skin and how you can stop and even reverse the process, go to www.controlyourage.com

About Ron Cummings

Ron Cummings is the founder and CEO of AminoGenesis Skin Care, which utilizes amino acids as the key ingredients to its age- and damage-reversing products. The formula for the solution features 17 plant-purified amino acids, which are necessary for healthy and radiant skin. The company’s formulas include anti-glycation properties, which are very rare in today’s skin-care products. Cummings donated one of his products, a protective agent, to support military forces in Afghanistan and received a hearty letter of gratitude from the Marines of Special Operations Company Bravo, which described the product’s excellent performance, as well as a flag that was flown “in the face of the enemy, over Forward Operating Base Robinson in Sangin, Afghanistan.”

 
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