Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Digital Eye Exam Machine Needed for QC's PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Written by M. McNeil   
Monday, 03 December 2012 11:09
The Early Childhood Coalition is hoping the generous Holiday spirit in the Quad Cities will help the group get a new digital eye exam machine this fall

(Moline, IL)  The Early Childhood Coalition (ECC) has been coordinating efforts to offer monthly free Early Learning Screenings for children 4 months to age five at various locations throughout Rock Island County for years.  The group also has spent a decade offering vision, hearing and overall developmental screenings.  Now it wants to make the screenings more effective and quicker.  This can be done with a new digital vision camera called the “Spot”, manufactured by Pediavision.

The Secretary of the ECC, Lisa Viaene, says the current camera the group is using, the ‘Photo Screener’ is becoming obsolete and the film is no longer being produced.  Viaene says the new camera will cost almost eight thousand dollars and she is reaching out to the community for assistance in securing the funds.   Since the group began their monthly screenings in September of 2002 more than 2,200 children have been screened.  Viaene says with the new camera thousands more children will be served.  She says when vision problems are found early children will be more successful throughout their lives.
***The media are invited to hear more information on the new camera on Monday, December 3 at 9:00 at the Early Childhood Coalition/AOK office (4341 18th Avenue Rock Island).

 
Governor Quinn Announces $1.3 Million to Improve Healthcare in Underserved Areas of Illinois PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Written by Leslie Wertheimer   
Monday, 03 December 2012 10:37

Federal Funding will Upgrade Health Information Technology for 1,600 Providers Across the State

CHICAGO – December 1, 2012. Governor Pat Quinn today announced that $1.3 million in federal funding was awarded to three Illinois not-for-profit organizations to help them upgrade health information technology services in underserved areas of the state. The grants made possible by the Illinois Office of Health Information Technology (OHIT) as part of its White Space Grant Program will connect providers in the Metro-Chicago area, Central and Southern Illinois. The OHIT anticipates the grants will enable more than 1,600 individual providers to connect with more than 48 health care organizations serving hundreds of thousands of patients every year.

“Upgrading our health information technology network is a critical part of our efforts to transform our health care system into one that focuses on wellness and keeping people healthy through better preventive care,” Governor Quinn said. “Improving communication among providers is a key to this transformation. These grants are another important step in the direction of a fully connected Illinois and better patient care.”

Federal health officials refer to “White Space” health care providers as those who are practicing in areas that are currently underserved by health information technology infrastructure.

The three grants totaling $1.3 million will be awarded to:

1.  Heartland Health Outreach, the Alliance of Community Health Services and the Chicago Health Information Technology Regional Extension Center (CHITREC) in Chicago. Grant amount: $500,000.

2.  The Illinois Critical Access Hospital Network in Princeton. Grant amount: $495,120.

3.  Southern Illinois Healthcare in Carbondale. Grant amount: $338,600.

Funding for these grants is made possible through the $18.8 million in federal funding awarded to Illinois in 2010 under the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act as part of the HIE Cooperative Agreement Program. Illinois is using the funding to implement the Illinois Health Information Exchange (ILHIE), a network for the secure sharing of clinical and administrative data among health care providers across the state.

The ILHIE will allow for better care coordination among providers, reduced medical errors and duplicative tests, controlled health care costs, and improved health outcomes. The White Space grants will fill in gaps throughout Illinois and connect organizations to health information exchange services that would not otherwise be able to connect.

“Illinois’ health information exchange network is only as strong as the volume and geographic diversity of providers connected to it,” OHIT Director Laura Zaremba said. “Through these projects we are connecting providers in communities that need our assistance the most.”

“Illinois is in an outstanding position to be a national leader in health information exchange for many years to come, “ added ILHIE Authority Executive Director Raul Recarey, who will be working closely with these and other providers all across Illinois. “This is an opportunity to leverage our federal funding in a way that promotes connectivity and improves health care quality and care coordination among providers.”

For additional information about health information exchange in Illinois please visit the ILHIE website at http://hie.illinois.gov.

 

About the Illinois Office of Health Information Technology (OHIT)

and the Illinois Health Information Exchange (ILHIE)

The Illinois Health Information Exchange (ILHIE) is a statewide, secure electronic transport network for sharing clinical and administrative data among health care providers in Illinois. The ILHIE allows providers to exchange electronic health information in real time and in a secure environment to improve health care quality and patient care. The Illinois Office of Health Information Technology  (OHIT) is working with the ILHIE Authority to support its development.

 

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Lung Cancer Proclamation Signed by Governor Branstad PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Written by Mickey Sandquist   
Monday, 03 December 2012 10:11

On Wednesday, November 28, Governor Terry E. Branstad signed a proclamation designating November 2012 as Lung Cancer Awareness and Education Month in Iowa.  Governor Branstad was joined by lung cancer survivors and their families and friends during the ceremony held at the State Capitol in Des Moines.  Also present were representatives from the American Lung Association, Mercy Cancer Center in Des Moines, Des Moines University and the American Cancer Society.

 

“The Governor’s Proclamation is recognition of the significant impact of lung cancer in Iowa and the importance of finding ways to reduce the burden of lung cancer for Iowans,” said Micki Sandquist, Executive Director of the American Lung Association in Iowa.

 

Later in the day, the American Lung Association sponsored a free, two-hour workshop, Frankly Speaking about Lung Cancer.  The workshop focused on the latest treatments for lung cancer.  Dr. Bradley Hiatt, a medical oncologist from Des Moines, and Rose Richman, a lung cancer nurse navigator from Mercy Cancer Center, spoke about the diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer, and about side-effects of care and how to effectively manage those side effects.  Rose and Dr. Hiatt also shared tools to overcome the social and emotional challenges of lung cancer.

 

Two lung cancer survivors, Gail Orcutt and Lori Tassin, shared their personal stories of triumph over lung cancer during the event.  Lori encouraged the audience with the message that a lung cancer diagnosis may be an opportunity to develop stronger ties to support and spiritual systems while battling cancer.

 
Ending Child Obesity in America Is a ‘Piece Of Cake,’ Says Health Expert PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Written by Ginny Grimsley   
Friday, 30 November 2012 16:04
Offers 4 Tips for Transformation

There are many complicated opinions from experts about why America’s children are becoming fatter, more diseased and emotionally unstable each year.

At the same time, bullying, teen suicides and child obesity continue to rise, and proposed solutions to these problems tend to be expensive and unlikely to be undertaken in these tough economic times, says Gordon Filepas, author of “Lean And Healthy To 100,” (www.adviceformychildren.com), a guide for achieving optimal health based on studying cultures where long lives are the norm.

“Even if implemented, most of these ‘solutions’ are not likely to solve the problem,” he says. “That’s because most Americans were never taught the simple, common-sense root of most obesity and disease. There’s no mystery or magic to it at all.”

Filepas talks about easy, inexpensive and natural steps to solving child obesity in five years or less:

• Parental accountability: Your job as a parent is to teach your children what they need to learn to become productive, balanced and healthy adults. Buying snack foods, sodas and junk food for your children is not being responsible. Plus, you’re rewarding companies that make these products. You’re probably listening to the “popular” health advice in America, which is mostly incorrect. You need to learn the correct common sense information once and for all so that it becomes easy for your child to stop craving these “foods.”

• School accountability: If your school sells and profits from any type of junk food in vending machines, it should be ashamed of itself. I know school budgets are strained, but making money from junk food is wrong on so many levels. If a school really needs to carry these foods to make money, then we should mandate that manufacturers create a “school version” that contains all the nutrients the human body needs and are made from only whole, natural food sources and nothing man-made. If implemented, students would shine in so many ways.

• Teach parents and children the root cause: From 20 years of health research, I’ve learned from experts that the root cause of obesity and disease is due to imbalances in the human body. The underlying, real root cause of these imbalances is a lifestyle that does not honor how the human body actually works, or respects what it really needs. The proper lifestyle is composed of the proper nutrition and daily living habits that maintain and preserve this nutrient foundation, and balances biological function. Without this lifestyle, biochemical imbalances occur inside the body at every level and begin to create the “symptoms” we call weight gain, addictions, cravings, emotional and behavioral imbalances, mood swings, learning problems, poor attitude, poor choices, disease and ultimately death.

• Focus on the inside first: The fatal flaw America is making in terms of its health and obesity is that it is trying to solve health and weight problems using outside-in solutions like calorie counting, calorie restriction, willpower, dieting, etc. This is ineffective because it does not create natural internal balance. These are “unnatural” man-made solutions that do not respect what the human body needs or how it works. The secret is to balance the inside first. Then everything on the outside will naturally balance itself automatically.

About Gordon Filepas

Health author and father Gordon Filepas spent thousands of hours over a 20-year period researching the research of the world’s top health, anti-aging and longevity experts and long-lived cultures after his father and brother both died of cancer. He boiled down more than 80 years of their research into the seven daily steps that ultimately matter. He has recently partnered with the national charity Beating the Odds Foundation to teach the information in his book, “Lean And Healthy To 100,” in schools to end child obesity. Gordon donates approximately $9 from every book sale to Beating the Odds Foundation when the book is purchased from this link: www.endchildobesity.us. Individuals or organizations interested in helping to end child obesity in America can contact Gordon through www.endchildobesity.us.

 
New Eye Exam Camera for the Quad Cites children PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Written by M. McNeil   
Friday, 30 November 2012 15:46
The Early Childhood Coalition is hoping the generous Holiday spirit in the Quad Cities will help the group get a new digital eye exam machine this fall

(Moline, IL)  The Early Childhood Coalition (ECC) has been coordinating efforts to offer monthly free Early Learning Screenings for children 4 months to age five at various locations throughout Rock Island County for years.  The group also has spent a decade offering vision, hearing and overall developmental screenings.  Now it wants to make the screenings more effective and quicker.  This can be done with a new digital vision camera called the “Spot”, manufactured by Pediavision.

The Secretary of the ECC, Lisa Viaene, says the current camera the group is using, the ‘Photo Screener’ is becoming obsolete and the film is no longer being produced.  Viaene says the new camera will cost almost eight thousand dollars and she is reaching out to the community for assistance in securing the funds.   Since the group began their monthly screenings in September of 2002 more than 2,200 children have been screened.  Viaene says with the new camera thousands more children will be served.  She says when vision problems are found early children will be more successful throughout their lives.

 
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