Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Diabetes On-The-Go PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Written by Ginny Grimsley   
Wednesday, 02 May 2012 12:23
Growing Industry Helps Diabetics Maintain Active Lifestyles

A whole industry has grown up around freeing diabetics to lead less restricted lives. New on the market, or on the verge of being introduced, are three “firsts”: tubeless insulin pumps, a needleless blood-glucose monitoring system, and diabetic-friendly frozen foods.

With the number of diabetics growing worldwide – 246 million at last count, according to the World Health Organization – businesses are motivated. In 2011, diabetes therapeutic products were a $23.7 billion dollar industry feeding a growing population that’s starving for a better quality of life, says Chef Robert Lewis, “The Happy Diabetic,” author of two cookbooks for people with the metabolic disorder.

“It wasn’t long ago that Type 1 diabetics had to be sure they packed ample sterile syringes and insulin, whether they were going to work for the day or on a road trip,” he says. “Monitoring blood sugar levels, which is crucial to keeping vital organs healthy, was painful, primitive and hit-or-miss.

“And food? That’s been the hardest. A diabetes diagnosis can feel like a life sentence of bland eating.”

Among the “firsts” Lewis says diabetics can look forward to:

• The first tubeless insulin pump. Thirty years ago, people with insulin-dependent diabetes had to give themselves shots around the clock to control their blood sugar levels. In some cases, diabetics were hospitalized to ensure they got the insulin necessary to prevent ketoacidosis, a condition that can lead to coma and death. In 1983, the insulin pump was introduced. It attaches to the body and provides continuous insulin injections. But while it was a major breakthrough, it can be bulky and awkward, with a dangling catheter. The most recent innovation is a streamlined version called the OmniPad. It has no tubes, it’s smaller and it attaches anywhere on the body with adhesive. It also has a built-in glucose-monitoring system.

• The first needleless glucometer. The Symphony tCGM System uses ultrasound to monitor blood-sugar levels, which will free people from the painful pricks needed to get a small blood sample for testing multiple times a day. The device, which attaches with adhesive to the body, continuously tracks glucose levels day and night and can send the readings to your smart phone. Under development for more than a decade, Symphony is undergoing the studies necessary to win regulatory approval.

• The first diabetic-friendly frozen meals. Meals-in-a-Bun (www.lifestylechefs.net) will arrive in Northeast U.S. grocery stores beginning in July and roll out across the country through the end of the year. They’re low on the glycemic index, low in sugar and carbs, high in soluble fiber, low in trans fat, high in lean protein and low in sodium, Lewis says. “And the best thing is, they are delicious.”  The five varieties – two vegan and three vegetarian – include selections like Thai Satay, mushrooms, broccoli and tofu in whole-wheat flax bun. “This is particularly exciting because, while there have been advances in equipment that makes life easier for diabetics, there haven’t been for convenient, packaged foods.”

Diabetics who do not watch what they eat may wind up suffering kidney damage, stomach problems, heart disease, pneumonia, gum disease, blindness, stroke, nerve damage, complications during pregnancy, loss of limb and other health problems, according to the CDC.

But many Americans are trending toward healthier diets, eating less meat, gluten, salt and sugar, Lewis says. Tasty foods developed for diabetics will be excellent choices for them, too.

“What’s good for diabetics is good for everyone,” he says. “And you don’t have to give up one teaspoon of flavor.

“There’s a reason why I am called ‘The Happy Diabetic’; I have discovered the joy of nutrition-rich food.”

About Lifestyle Chefs

Lifestyle Chefs is a Santa Clara, Calif., company specializing in creating meals inspired by world cuisines and using only natural, healthy and nutritious ingredients. Lifestyle Chefs’ products are all vegetarian and diabetic-friendly, perfect for families who want fast, convenient meals that are low in calories, high in nutrition and robust in flavor. Chef Robert Lewis, “The Happy Diabetic,” was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in 1998. He specializes in flavorful recipes that won’t spike a diabetic’s blood sugar.

 
Loebsack Announces More Than $38,000 for Improvements at Davenport Community Health Care, Inc. PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Written by Joe Hand   
Wednesday, 02 May 2012 08:46

Washington, D.C. – Congressman Dave Loebsack announced today that Community Health Care, Inc. in Davenport will receive a $38,750 grant from the Department of Health and Human Services’ Immediate Facility Improvements Program.

“Iowa’s doctors are second to none in the quality of health care they provide,” said Loebsack.  “These funds will help upgrade the facility at Davenport Community Health Care to ensure the health care professionals can continue to offer the highest quality of care.  Community health centers play a vital role in towns across Iowa and I am excited the improvements that will be made in Davenport.”

Last Fall, Loebsack toured Davenport Community Health Care, which serves all of the Quad Cities and is in the process of expanding to Clinton.

###

 
Yoga: Avoid Beginner’s Mistakes While Attaining a Well of Happiness PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Written by Ginny Grimsley   
Wednesday, 02 May 2012 08:41

Yoga has become a popular option for alternative health management. Research has shown the practice can significantly reduce mental and physical stress, improve mood, and slow the aging process.

But some yogis believe many of the estimated 20 million U.S. students are missing the best part of the discipline – the inner happiness attainable through a healthy mind-body connection. They also worry about injuries that result when beginners tackle poses and exercises without proper guidance.

“There are several disciplines of yoga, and with its rich history, the beginner can easily get lost – or worse – injured,” says Mary Jo Ricketson, an experienced yoga practitioner and healthcare specialist, and author of Moving Meditation (www.thegoodwithin.com). A registered nurse, she also holds a master’s degree in education from Northwestern University.

“What I detail in my book is a comprehensive approach for both mind and body. This reciprocal relationship maximizes health benefits, and has exponentially positive consequences beyond the individual.”

People have been practicing yoga for thousands of years, she says. In the West, the practice has integrated with our culture leading to variations including “extreme” yoga. Ricketson warns this sort of exercise can alienate beginners, who may not be ready to “jump in the deep end first.” Without the proper training and guidance, she adds, beginners risk injuring their neck, lower back, knees and shoulders.

The most important step is getting started, Ricketson says. Here are seven things beginners – and anyone practicing yoga – should know to maximize their benefits:

1. Cardiovascular (aerobic) training: As with meditation, focused breathing is a cornerstone of mind-body training. Aerobic means “with oxygen” and aerobic movement increases the flow of oxygen-rich blood throughout the body, including the brain. Cardiovascular training is the single most important aspect of the physical training because it keeps the heart open and strong.

2. Core and strength training: This includes the students’ abdomen and buttocks, and the lower back region, which extends to the base of the skull. Here is where strength, stability and balance originate.

3. Flexibility training (yoga postures): Stretching simply feels good, and it reminds students to not only be more flexible in one’s body, but also one’s mind. This step allows us to move (and live) with greater ease.

4. Adequate rest: Sleep is a necessary part of life, and sufficient rest is needed for energy and equilibrium.

5. Life-giving nutrition: Making the right choices in food allows yoga students to achieve an optimal, balanced state. This includes nutritional foods consumed in moderation.

6. Family/community/church: From Epicurus to modern science, study and observation show that we find greater happiness with access to friends and family.

7. Written goals and a plan of action: Goals and stated intention act as a road map to achieving balanced well-being.

Ricketson says the above steps are just the beginning. She says tapping in to the mind-body connection also helps memory loss, attention deficit disorders, public violence – including in schools – as well as an unknown amount of needless human suffering.

“We all have within us a potential to experience optimal well-being in mind and body,” she says. “This potential, the Good Within, can be realized through the work of mind-body training. Our training is a moving meditation – a daily practice of exercises that awaken all that is Good Within.”

About Mary Jo Ricketson

Mary Jo Ricketson has studied human health and well-being for decades, earning a Bachelor of Science in nursing and a master’s in education. In 1999, she opened the Center for Mind-Body Training, which offers classes, seminars, and personal training. Yoga training is done in her studio, in schools, and in corporate settings. She lives in the Boston area with her husband and two children.

 
Harkin Announces Over $7.5 Million for Iowa Health Centers PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Written by Sen. Tom Harkin   
Wednesday, 02 May 2012 08:33

Funding comes from Affordable Care Act Program

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA) today announced that six Iowa communities will be awarded funding totaling $7,582,021.00 from the Affordable Care Act Capital Development’s Immediate Facility Improvement and Building Capacity grant programs. The funding will help build, expand, and improve community health centers in the state. As Chairman of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee, Harkin played a pivotal role in passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).  He is also Chairman of the Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education and Related Agencies.

“Particularly in these tough economic times, community health centers play a vital role in our state, providing health care for thousands of Iowans who lack adequate health insurance,” said Harkin.  “These Affordable Care Act funds will help health centers care for additional patients while also creating jobs in these communities.  I applaud Secretary Sebelius for today’s announcement and congratulate the Iowa communities that were awarded funding.”

Today’s awards are part of a series of investments that are made available to community health centers under the Affordable Care Act, which provides $9.5 billion to expand services nationally over five years and $1.5 billion to support major construction and renovation projects at community health centers.  According to a new report released today by the Department of Health and Human Services, the ACA has already supported 190 construction and renovation projects at health centers and the creation of 67 new health center sites across the country, and will support more than 485 new health center construction and renovation projects and the creation of 245 new community health center sites nationwide over the next two years.

Details of the funding are as follows:

Immediate Facility Improvements Program:
Davenport-Community Health Care, Inc.-$38,750
Dubuque-Crescent Community Health Center-$260,053
Leon-Community Health Centers of Southern Iowa, Inc.-$483,500
Urbandale-Primary Health Care, Inc.-$499,718

Building Capacity Grant Program:
Ottumwa-River Hills Community Health Center-$5,000,000 for consolidation of facilities
Sioux City-Siouxland Community Health Center-$1,300,000 for expansion of current facilities

 
Haiku as a Spiritual Practice PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Written by Unitarian Universalist Congregation   
Tuesday, 01 May 2012 14:20
Nancy Huse, retired professor of English at Augustana College, will lead a class on  “Haiku as a Spiritual Practice - writing in the springtime” at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of the Quad Cities.  The class, which is open to the public, will be at 7 pm May 1 and May 8.  Haiku is a Japanese poem of seventeen syllables, in three lines of five, seven, and five, traditionally evoking images of the natural world.

 
<< Start < Prev 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 Next > End >>

Page 131 of 186