Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Long-Term Care Crisis Prompts More Aggressive Collection Tactics PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Written by Ginny Grimsley   
Friday, 09 May 2014 14:01
Insurance Industry Expert Shares Tips for Protecting
Your Family from “Filial” Support Laws

Most people do not understand filial support laws, which are spreading to more states – 28 and counting, says insurance industry expert Chris Orestis.

“We’re living longer, but for many of us, that also means we’ll require some type of  long-term health care at some point,” says Orestis, a longtime industry insider and author of “Help on the Way,” (http://ebook.lifecarefunding.com/), which explains the problem of funding long-term care and offers solutions.

“It’s a problem no matter what your age because we’re experiencing a “Silver Tsunami” of retiring baby boomers and the costs of long-term care can be extremely high. Medicaid is the only option for many seniors, and that’s straining the funding for that safety net. Many people are not eligible for Medicaid, but also cannot afford the expense of care.”

As a result, long-term care providers and the federal government are bringing lawsuits and mandating claw-back actions against families, insurance companies and legal advisors, he says. Many are turning to filial support laws, which impose a duty upon adult children for the support of their impoverished parents. Medicaid also has the right to sue families in probate court to “claw-back” funds spent on care.

Just one recent example involved John Pittas, a 47-year-old restaurant owner who was sued by a nursing home company for $93,000 in expenses incurred by his mother over a six-month period after she was denied Medicaid eligibility.

“The court finding even granted discretion to the nursing home company to seek payment from any family members it wished to pursue,” says Orestis.

To avoid a financial catastrophe, he says families should consider these options:

•  Know your and your family’s health-care rights as a veteran. Veterans who have honorably served their country should take advantage of their VA benefits – not only for their well-being, but also for their family’s health. Additional programs that may apply to family members include the VA Civilian Health and Medical Program (CHAMPVA), a comprehensive health-care program in which the VA shares the cost of covered services and supplies for eligible beneficiaries; the spina bifida health-care benefits program for certain Korea and Vietnam veterans' birth children; and TRICARE, another health-care program serving uniformed service members, retirees and their families.

•  You can convert your life insurance policy for long-term care. There is $27.2 trillion worth of in-force life insurance policies in the United States, according to the National Association of Insurance Commissioners – that’s triple the amount of home equity today! Rather than cancel or drop a policy to save on premiums when faced with long-term care needs, you can use it to pay for home care, assisted-living or nursing home expenses. “I’ve been lobbying state Legislatures to make the public aware of their legal right to use this option,” says Orestis, CEO of Life Care Funding, (www.lifecarefunding.com). Seniors can sell their policy for 30 to 60 percent of its death benefit value and put the money into an irrevocable, tax-free fund designated specifically for their care.

•  Don’t be so quick to attempt to qualify for Medicaid. Many people who need significant long-term health care can’t afford it, so they drop life insurance policies that they’ve been carrying for years in order to qualify for Medicaid. Families often turn to Medicaid to pay for nursing home care, but it comes with many restrictions, including choice of facilities. In a situation where one spouse is healthy and the other is not, the spouse living independently will also face restrictions on the amount of assets he or she can retain, for instance, a maximum $2,898.00 for monthly maintenance.

About Chris Orestis

Chris Orestis, nationally known senior health-care advocate, expert, and author is CEO of Life Care Funding, (www.lifecarefunding.com), which created the model for converting life insurance policies into protected Long-Term Care Benefit funds. His company has been providing care benefits to policy holders since 2007. A former life insurance industry lobbyist with a background in long-term care issues, he created the model to provide an option for middle-class people who are not wealthy enough to pay for long-term care, and not poor enough to qualify for Medicaid.

 
CASI-Center for Active Seniors, Inc. Celebrates Older Americans Month with a Focus on a Safe Today. Healthy Tomorrow PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Written by Sarah Arp   
Friday, 09 May 2014 12:44
CASI (Davenport, IA) May 1, 2014 — CASI is celebrating Older Americans Month this May with activities designed to help older adults stay safe from unintended injuries.

Older Americans Month is sponsored each May by the U.S. Administration for Community Living (ACL). This year’s theme is Safe Today. Healthy Tomorrow. The focus is on injury prevention, including fire, motor vehicle, and consumer product safety; improper use of medicine; and more.

According to ACL, “unintentional injuries to this population result in at least 6 million medically treated injuries and more than 30,000 deaths every year.” Falls are the leading cause of both fatal and nonfatal injuries for those aged 65+. More than 21,700 older adults die from falls each year, and every 15 seconds, an older adult is seen in an Emergency Department for a fall-related injury. The direct medical cost of falls is currently estimated to top $36 billion annually and is expected to grow to nearly $62 billion by 2020.

Yet, falls are not a normal part of aging, and they can be prevented through a combination of interventions. These include exercising, getting a fall risk assessment, reviewing medications, having vision and hearing checked, and making the home environment safe. More tips are available at www.ncoa.org/FallsPrevention.

Check out our Special Events calendar for the month of May! Make the “CASI Lifestyle” Choice today!

CASI is located at 1035 W. Kimberly Road. Davenport, IA 52807 563-386-7477
www.CasiSeniors.org Monday-Friday 8:00 a.m.- 5:00 p.m.

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Celebrate National Women's Health Week PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Written by Barbara Cire   
Wednesday, 07 May 2014 12:54

May 11–17, 2014 is National Women’s Health Week. This observance, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office on Women’s Health, encourages women across America to lead longer, healthier lives by taking simple, everyday steps to improve their health and well-being.

The National Institute on Aging, part of the National Institutes of Health, conducts and supports research into all aspects of aging and health, including that of older women.

For National Women’s Health Week, we’d like to bring one publication in particular to your attention: Menopause: Time for a Change. This comprehensive 37-page booklet discusses menopause, hot flashes, and other menopausal symptoms. It also includes information on what women can do to stay healthy after menopause.

The booklet can be viewed online or downloaded for print from our website. Or your readers may order print copies from the NIA website or by calling toll-free 1-800-222-2225. We have many other free consumer publications available on our website – www.nia.nih.gov – on a wide range of topics related to healthy aging for women and for men.

We invite you to feature this booklet in your publication or on your website. For more information about the resources available from the National Institute on Aging, please contact us at 301-496-1752 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 
3 Simple Things You Can Do Today to Feel Better Tomorrow PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Written by Ginny Grimsley   
Monday, 05 May 2014 10:56
Doctor Outlines Easy Changes That Can Vastly
Improve Health, Happiness and Well-Being

“Imagine you’re a spider with just one leg,” says Dr. Frank King.

“You put forth immense effort to try to haul yourself around and not only does it wear you out, it’s frustrating and you don’t get far.” King is a chiropractor and doctor of naturopathy specializing in homeopathic remedies, and author of The Healing Revolution (www.kingbio.com).

“It gets a bit easier with two legs and easier still with four legs. But it’s not till you have all eight legs that you can really dance.”

Dr. King explains that the eight legs represent Eight Essentials we need for optimum mental, physical and spiritual health: Empowering your human spirit; Water; Nutrition; Fitness; Sleep; Nature; Relationships; and Hands On Techniques (touch).

“It would be overwhelming and self-defeating to look at all eight areas and think, ‘I have to make significant changes in every area immediately!” Dr. King says. “You don’t have to and who could? I know from my experience with countless patients and friends, and even in my own life, that you can see immediate results by making a few small changes at a time.”

Dr. King describes three that are easy to make and will have you feeling better quickly.

•  Drink half your body weight in ounces of spring or well water every day.
If you weigh 150 pounds, that’s 75 ounces of water (about 9 cups).

“Many of us walk around dehydrated without realizing it and that can have a significant effect on our health and how we feel,” Dr. King says. Dehydrated bodies trap toxins and encourage water retention – a natural defense against the chronic “drought.”

“Our bodies need the steady flow of pure, spring or well water. If you don’t like the taste, try mixing up to a teaspoon of sea salt into a quart of water,” he says.

A simple test for dehydration: Pinch the skin on the back of your hand and hold for three seconds. When you release, if the ridge from the pinch remains for more than a second, you’re probably dehydrated.

•  Take at least a few minutes every day to connect with nature. Nature brings perpetual revitalization and ongoing renewal, especially when experienced through multiple senses:  the smell of freshly turned earth or evergreens in the woods; the touch of cool stream water on your face or feet; the sight of birds on the wing and budding blooms.

“These are not just pleasant little gifts to experience – we need them for restoration, renewal, revival and rehabilitation,” Dr. King says. “The more disconnected we become from the Earth, the more we inhibit our body’s natural ability to heal.”

•  Take a brisk, 10- to 20-minute walk every day. Walking is the simplest, most natural form of exercise. You might walk a nature trail, walk to the store instead of driving or take your pet for a stroll.

“Three brisk 10-minute walks a day are as effective at lowering blood pressure as one 30-minute walk,” Dr. King says, citing an Arizona State University study.

“Outdoor walking is preferable to walking on a treadmill or other machine, since the uneven surfaces and changing directions of natural walking will engage more muscles and tendons.”

Swing each arm in synchronization with the opposite foot to strengthen your cross-crawl functionality and mind-body balance.

About Dr. Frank King

Dr. Frank King is a chiropractor, doctor of naturopathy, and founder and president of King Bio, an FDA-registered pharmaceutical manufacturing company dedicated to education, research, development, manufacture and distribution of safe and natural homeopathic medicines for people and pets. Dr. King is also the author of, The Healing Revolution: Eight Essentials to Awaken Abundant Life Naturally! (www.kingbio.com). A fourth-generation farmer, Dr. King raises yak, camel, boar, wisent and American bison sold under the Carolina Bison brand. He is a member of the Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia Convention of the United States.

 
Blood donors give patients the chance to create a lifetime of hope PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Health, Medicine & Nutrition
Written by Ben Corey   
Friday, 02 May 2014 14:16

 

PEORIA, Ill. (May 1, 2014) — With summer right around the corner, the American Red Cross asks eligible donors to make giving blood as much a part of their summer plans as barbecues, ball games and road trips. Donors of all blood types are needed.

“Blood donations often decline during the summer when schools are out of session and families are vacationing,” said Shelly Heiden, community CEO of the Red Cross Heart of America Blood Services Region. “But the need for blood is constant. Eligible donors are encouraged to make an appointment now to roll up a sleeve and give patients a chance for hope this summer and throughout the year.”

To help kick off summer, those who present to give blood between May 24 and 26 will receive a Red Cross cooling towel while supplies last.

The Red Cross provides blood to approximately 2,700 hospitals and transfusion centers across the country. Each day, the Red Cross must collect about 15,000 blood donations to meet the needs of patients at these facilities.

Learn more and make an appointment to donate blood by visiting redcrossblood.org or calling

1-800-RED CROSS.

Upcoming blood donation opportunities:

Clinton County

May 23 from 2-6 p.m. at Clinton Zion Lutheran Church, 439 3rd Ave. South in Clinton, Iowa Clinton

May 27 from 2-6 p.m. at Clinton Church of Christ, 210 N. 13th St. in Clinton, Iowa

Henry County

May 27 from 1-6 p.m. at First United Methodist Church, 214 NW Second Ave. in Galva, Ill.

Lee County

May 20 from 12-4 p.m. at Borg Warner, 1350 Franklin Grove Road in Dixon, Ill.

May 31 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Culver's, 1317 N. Galena Ave. in Dixon, Ill.

Mercer County

May 20 from 11:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. at VFW Hall, 106 SW 3rd Ave. in Aledo, Ill.

Whiteside County

May 21 from 2-6 p.m. at American Red Cross, 112 W. Second St. in Rock Falls, Ill.

May 22 from 12-6 p.m. at United Methodist Church, 200 W. Lincolnway in Morrison, Ill.

May 27 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Robert Fulton Community Center, 912 4th St. in Fulton, Ill.

May 28 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at American Red Cross, 112 W. Second St. in Rock Falls, Ill.

May 31 from 7:30-10:30 a.m. at American Red Cross, 112 W. Second St. in Rock Falls, Ill.

How to donate blood

Simply call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or visit redcrossblood.org to make an appointment or for more information. All blood types are needed to ensure a reliable supply for patients. A blood donor card or driver’s license or two other forms of identification are required at check-in. Individuals who are 17 years of age (16 with parental consent in some states), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally good health may be eligible to donate blood. High school students and other donors 18 years of age and younger also have to meet certain height and weight requirements.

About the American Red Cross

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. The Red Cross is supported in part through generous financial donations from the United Way. For more information, please visit redcross.org or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.

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