Military & Veterans News
Coast Guard intelligence, 1st decade in national intelligence community, 221 years of experience PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Military & Veterans News
Written by Lisa Novak   
Wednesday, 04 January 2012 14:03

December marked the 10th anniversary of the Coast Guard’s formal entry into the national intelligence community, although many had long perceived the Coast Guard as a de facto member.

The Coast Guard began its long involvement with the work of intelligence in 1790. Tariffs imposed on goods imported to the United States, in order to raise revenue, caused lawless merchants to unload their cargoes at isolated locations to avoid paying the tariffs at customs houses in ports. Identifying this as a threat within the new nation’s maritime domain, Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton requested and received 10 revenue cutters to patrol the coast to identify smugglers and ensure tariffs were paid.

Modern intelligence operations began developing as a discrete service in the Coast Guard around 1915. By the time Prohibition became the law of the land, the Coast Guard had developed into an effective force against the smuggling of liquor and narcotics. This caused crime syndicates to use clandestine radio stations to communicate between their smuggling vessels and land-based operations. Coast Guard intelligence forces broke the smugglers’ codes, enabling the service to battle the smugglers and break up criminal syndicates. A Coast Guard intelligence unit was established in Boston in 1934 and in 1936 an Intelligence Division was created at Coast Guard Headquarters, Washington, D.C., both a result of the service’s successes.

Members of Coast Guard intelligence were involved in efforts to minimize sabotage and espionage throughout World War II. Coast Guard intelligence worked to secure, evaluate and disseminate information pertaining to Coast Guard and maritime matters, including assisting in identifying known and potential enemy agents and sympathizers. Coast Guard intelligence personnel were involved with counterintelligence support for the war effort in many critical ports throughout the United States. Because of the efforts of Coast Guard intelligence during the war there was not a single known instance of foreign-inspired sabotage on vessels or waterfront facilities in the U.S.

The Coast Guard continued its efforts against narcotics smuggling in the decades following the war.  The 1980 Mariel Boatlift, the mass exodus of Cuban migrants from their island nation to the U.S., reinforced the need for intelligence capabilities to further develop and become more structured. Federal officials realized the nature of many threats facing the United States were seaborne and the Coast Guard, with its unique capabilities and intelligence work, was seen as the agency that had much to offer against those threats.

“Intelligence is a force multiplier and a hedge against risk,” said Rear Adm. Thomas F. Atkin, assistant commandant for Intelligence and Criminal Investigations. “Intelligence support is at the heart of the Coast Guard motto: Semper Paratus [Always Ready]. We work to create decision advantage to protect and advance U.S. interests. We accomplish this by conducting intelligence operations and activities to provide timely, relevant and actionable intelligence to shape operations, planning and decision-making. In a time of dwindling resources, it’s important to have appropriate levels of intelligence to identify and warn against the next threat on the horizon.”

The U.S. House of Representatives Permanent Committee on Select Intelligence discussed the Coast Guard’s role in counter-drug intelligence and in the late 1990s began discussions about making the Coast Guard part of the broader intelligence community. The incidents of Sept. 11, became demonstrative of the kind of close-to-home, national security issues in which the Coast Guard would play a vital role. The Intelligence Authorization Act of 2002 formally brought the Coast Guard into the intelligence community.

Formal inclusion in the intelligence community has resulted in additional authorities and resources for the Coast Guard, enabling the agency to expand its capabilities to include a cryptology program (codebreaking) and a counterintelligence service.  The counterintelligence service helps preserve the operational integrity of the Coast Guard by shielding it from the intelligence activities of foreign powers, terrorist groups, and criminal organizations.

Coast Guard Intelligence applies its capabilities to all Coast Guard mission sets and has provided support for major operations including the response to the 2010 earthquake in Haiti. Intelligence personnel provided the earliest port infrastructure damage reports, which supported multi-national efforts to provide relief and port recovery. Coast Guard Intelligence also produced threat assessments and briefings that supported force protection decisions and other national and interagency operational decisions.

In addition to numerous drug and human smuggling cases, Coast Guard Intelligence has provided critical support to Coast Guard commanders wrestling with non-traditional intelligence needs, such as the interdiction of the Bangun Perkasa fishing vessel and its use of illegal driftnets.

Coast Guard intelligence has matured during the last 10 years and its focus has solidified. In addition to the cryptology program and counterintelligence service, Coast Guard intelligence includes a robust criminal investigative service, experienced intelligence fusion centers, and a developing cyber capability. Coast Guard intelligence specialists in the field are a critical component of the enterprise, working in units across the nation and throughout the Coast Guard chain of command to provide operational commanders with the intelligence support they need.    Today’s Coast Guard intelligence encompasses a wide range of activities and capabilities, all striving to provide decision advantage to support senior Coast Guard leaders in their policy-making role, the Department of Homeland Security and its components, and other national intelligence or federal law enforcement agencies.

“Coast Guard intelligence provides operational commanders with the understanding they need to make decisions on how best to deploy assets and conduct operations,” said Adm. Bob Papp, commandant of the Coast Guard.

The Coast Guard’s persistent presence in the maritime domain, due to its diverse mission sets and broad legal authorities, fills a unique niche within the intelligence community. As a member of the armed forces, the Coast Guard is at the intersection between homeland security and national defense. As a federal law enforcement agency and national intelligence community member, the Coast Guard is also positioned as a bridge between these two important groups. Because of the service’s unique access, emphasis and expertise in the maritime domain – an area where other U.S. government agencies typically are not present – it collects and reports intelligence that supports its own missions as well as national security objectives.

 
Specialized Illinois National Guard Unit Mobilized for Afghanistan PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Military & Veterans News
Written by Illinois National Guard PAO   
Wednesday, 04 January 2012 13:36

Nearly 20 Soldiers Mobilize Jan. 4 as Part of an Embedded Training Team

SPRINGFIELD, IL (12/28/2011)(readMedia)-- A deployment ceremony is scheduled for approximately 20 Soldiers who will deploy to Afghanistan as part of an embedded training team. The ceremony for the Bilateral Embedded Staff Team (BEST) A9 will be Jan.4 at 1 p.m. at the Illinois Military Academy at Camp Lincoln in Springfield.

The BEST Soldiers will train for a brief time at Camp Atterbury, Ind., before deploying to Poland for approximately two months to train with the Polish Land Forces. The unique mission allows Illinois Army National Guard Soldiers to train and deploy side-by-side with their Polish counterparts. Following the training, the Soldiers will deploy to Afghanistan for a six-month mobilization. The Soldiers are from various parts of Illinois and were selected for the mission based on their training and skills.

"This mobilization illustrates the diverse skill sets and training of our Illinois Army National Guard Soldiers and the variety of missions we support in today's challenging international environment, as well as in our state and community," said Maj. Gen. William Enyart, Adjutant General of the Illinois National Guard. "These troops are instrumental in helping train foreign Soldiers to defend their country while polishing our Guardsmen's skills."

The team will assist the Afghan government to extend its authority across the country, perform security operations and help stabilize the war-torn nation. The Soldiers will also mentor and support the Afghan National Army and support Afghan government programs to disarm illegally armed groups.

News media attending the event should arrive at least 30 minutes prior to the ceremony and are required to notify the Public Affairs Office by 10 a.m., Jan.4 or they will not be allowed access onto Camp Lincoln. For more information call the Public Affairs Office at 217-761-3569.

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Braley Presents Purple Heart, Bronze Star to Dubuque WWII Veteran PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Military & Veterans News
Written by Jeff Giertz   
Tuesday, 27 December 2011 11:14
66 years later, Zane Thorpe will finally receive seven medals he earned in service to his country 

 

Waterloo, IA – Today, Rep. Bruce Braley (IA-01) will travel to Dubuque to present seven military service medals – including the Purple Heart and the Bronze Star – to Zane Thorpe, a World War II Army veteran who was awarded the medals but never received them after he was honorably discharged from the military in 1945.

In his discharge papers, the Army told Thorpe he was entitled to the medals, but because of a shortage, they were never given to him.  This November, Thorpe’s family approached Braley’s office for assistance in finally obtaining the medals, 66 years after they were granted.

Thorpe enlisted in the Army in April 1943.  After basic training, he was assigned to the 157th Combat Regiment, 45th Division, 3rd Battalion, L Company, which was deployed to Sicily and campaigned throughout Italy.  By 1944, Thorpe’s unit had moved on to France and later Germany, where he was wounded in the Battle of the Bulge.  Thorpe was evacuated to a hospital in England, and was transferred to a hospital in Texas.  He was discharged in July 1945 after V-E Day.

The Medals Award Ceremony was held on Thursday, December 22nd, 2011 @ 11:00am at the Oak Park Place Senior Community, 1381 Oak Park Place in Dubuque, Iowa

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Illinois National Guard Recruits, Families Prepare for Military PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Military & Veterans News
Written by Spc John Dorsey and Sgt. Charlie Helmholt, 139th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment   
Friday, 23 December 2011 16:16

CHICAGO, IL (12/21/2011)(readMedia)-- On the morning of Dec. 3, the booming voices of drill sergeants were heard throughout the Illinois National Guard's Kedzie armory in Chicago.

Recruits stood at attention while cadre of Company B, Illinois National Guard Recruiting Retention Command (RRC) conducted a simulated day of Army basic training.

With their families in attendance, recruits took part in the Recruit Sustainment Program (RSP) workshops. The program is sponsored by the Family Support Brigade, a not-for-profit organization partnered with RSP to provide family support, and is designed to give both new recruits and their families an in depth look at the life of a Soldier in basic training.

"We are here to prepare the recruits physically, mentally and emotionally for the military," said 1st Sgt. Aaron Ferrer of Highland Park, the senior enlisted adviser for Company B.

The day consisted of four main events that included combatives, weapons familiarization, team building exercises and military operations in an urbanized terrain training.

These events instill discipline and confidence in the recruits. For example, combatives provides them a better working knowledge of self defense they can use in future operations, said Staff Sgt. Justin M. Gullion of Northbrook, the level-one combatives instructor for Company B.

Pvt. Katharine Linhart of Brookfield, with Company B, enlisted her junior year of high school. She recently completed Basic Combat Training and will attend Advance Individual Training to become a combat medic after she completes high school.

Linhart said the RSP training prepared her for basic training and helped her maintain that discipline.

"It's been very active and we do a lot of hands-on training," said Linhart.

The program exposes enlistees to what they may experience in basic training and gets them accustomed to the Army's core values, other Soldiers and noncommissioned officers.

"It definitely makes me feel like I chose to do the right thing with my life," said Linhart.

The program was designed not only to show recruits and their families the military lifestyle, but also as a tool to keep recruiting numbers high and attrition rate low.

By giving recruits a "sneak peak" at what to expect in basic training helps them make an educated decision on whether or not the military is the correct career path for them.

The state's program has shown increasingly effective results, said Ferrer. While the National Guard Bureau standard is 83 percent of Soldiers to ship to basic training, the Illinois National Guard has exceeded this.

"Our numbers in the state of Illinois for Fiscal Year 2011 recruit ship rate was 91 percent," said Ferrer. "This clearly shows that programs like RSP are working to make the process of recruitment and retention more efficient."

"Preparing and ensuring these recruits and their families a smooth transition into the military arena is our goal and we are here to do just that," said Ferrer.

Photo 1: Photo by Sgt. Charlie Helmholt, 139th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment / Staff Sgt. Justin M. Gullion of Northbrook, the level-one combatives instructor for Company B, Illinois National Guard Recruiting and Retention Command, displays a dominant mounting technique to family members during a self defense workshop as a part of the recruit sustainment program Dec. 3 at the Illinois National Guard Kedzie armory Chicago.

Photo 2: Photo by Spc. Jason Dorsey, 139th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment/ Staff Sgt. Francisco Santiago of Chicago, of Company B, Illinois National Guard Recruit Retention Command, explains the fundamentals of weapons handling during a class on urban warfare training as part of a recruit sustainment program workshop Dec. 3 at the Illinois National Guard Kedzie armory in Chicago.

For high resolution photos, please contact the Illinois National Guard Public Affairs Office at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

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Governor Quinn Signs Laws to Improve Quality of Life for Illinois Veterans PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Military & Veterans News
Written by Nafia Khan   
Friday, 23 December 2011 15:50

New Laws Improve Access to Jobs, Health Insurance

CHICAGO – December 19, 2011. Governor Pat Quinn today signed legislation that will improve the quality of life for Illinois’ Veterans. Senate Bill 1587, sponsored by Sen. Antonio Munoz (D-Chicago) and Rep. Edward Acevedo (D-Chicago), and Senate Bill 40, sponsored by Sen. Susan Garrett (D-Highwood) and Rep. Lisa Dugan (D-Kankakee), make it easier for Veterans to gain access to employment and health care.

“The men and women who have courageously defended our democracy overseas should not return home only to fight for necessities like jobs and health insurance,” said Governor Quinn. “We owe it to our Veterans to make their transition to civilian life as seamless as possible.”

Senate Bill 1587 makes it easier for Veterans to become members of the Illinois State Police (ISP). Under the new law, education requirements will be waived for individuals who have been honorably discharged with a campaign medal after serving in Afghanistan or Iraq. On average, a servicemember serves three to four years before being discharged, and that experience makes Veterans particularly valuable assets to the ISP.

"Having been a Veteran who returned home and found limited job opportunities, I applaud the efforts of Governor Quinn and the state legislators to improve the quality of life for soldiers seeking to further their careers to serve and protect,” said Illinois State Police Director Hiram Grau. “This law will give Veterans every opportunity to apply and test within our department, and will significantly increase the pool of qualified, experienced candidates representing the Illinois State Police.”

Governor Quinn also signed Senate Bill 40, which extends the Veterans’ Care program. The program provides Veterans with comprehensive health care coverage for $40 or $70 per month (depending on income). The program had been set to expire on Jan. 1.

“Employment and the availability affordable of healthcare are among the most critical needs of the Illinois veteran community,” said Erica Borggren, Director of the Illinois Department of Veterans’ Affairs. “These measures will have an immediate, direct impact for Illinois’ past and present heroes in uniform.”

The law also helps members of the Illinois National Guard receive compensation more quickly when responding to in-state natural disasters. Under the law, the Illinois National Guard State Active Duty Fund will be created to more efficiently reimburse Guard members called to active duty in the event of state disasters.

“Our Soldiers and Airmen always stand ready for any mission, whether here at home or overseas,” said Maj. Gen. William Enyart, Illinois National Guard Adjutant General. “As responders, this bill will help the Illinois National Guard's immediate response to emergencies. It will allow us to move forward during the mission knowing our soldiers, airmen and suppliers will receive prompt payment during a crisis and won't have to worry about paying their families bills.”

For more information about these and other programs for Veterans, visit www.operationhomefront.org or call the Illinois Department of Veterans’ Affairs at (217) 782-6641 or (312) 814-2460.

 

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