Music & Entertainment
Jazz and Popsicles Open Free Concert Series in West Branch PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Music & Entertainment
Written by Adam Prato   
Friday, 10 May 2013 15:05

WEST BRANCH, IOWA— “Jazz and Pop” will kick off this year’s Music on the Village Green concert series in West Branch, Iowa. The award-winning West Branch High School Jazz Band, followed by student a cappella singers, performs on Friday, May 24 at 7:00 p.m. Main Street West Branch will hand out free popsicles during “Jazz and Pop”.

Following the May 24 performance Herbert Hoover National Historic Site, in cooperation with Main Street West Branch, invites visitors to a series of special musical events each Thursday night in June. The weekly performances feature folk band The Hollands (June 6), bluesman Kevin “BF” Burt (June 13), guitarist Scott Cawelti (June 20), and bluegrass band The Feralings (June 27). The concerts are free and begin at 7:00 p.m. at Herbert Hoover National Historic Site in West Branch, Iowa.

“We’re excited about the bands coming to perform this year,” said park superintendent Pete Swisher, “and about bringing the community together around events in Herbert Hoover National Historic Site.”

The outdoor concerts will take place on the village green at the intersection of Parkside Drive and Main Street in historic downtown West Branch.  The village green provides a classic small town setting in which to enjoy an evening of free entertainment.  There is ample parking nearby, and people are encouraged to bring lawn chairs or ground blankets.

Scott Cawelti’s performance on June 20 is courtesy of Humanities Iowa, a private, non-profit state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Herbert Hoover National Historic Site and the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum are in West Branch, Iowa at exit 254 off I-80. Both are open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Central Time. For more information go online at www.nps.gov/heho or call (319) 643-2541.

Herbert Hoover National Historic Site

110 Parkside Drive

PO Box 607

West Branch, Iowa 52358


319 643-2541 phone

319 643-7864 fax

www.nps.gov/heho


Twitter: @HooverNPS

Facebook: HerbertHooverNHS

 
Preservation Hall Jazz Band Performs Free Concert at Brucemore Celebrating Hancher’s 40th Anniversary and Commemorating the Five Year Anniversary of the 2008 Flood PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Music & Entertainment
Written by Tara Richards   
Friday, 10 May 2013 12:33

Brucemore will host a special 2013 event celebrating Hancher’s 40th anniversary and commemorating the five-year anniversary of the flood. On June 13 at 7:00 p.m., Living with Floods, will bring the Preservation Hall Jazz Band, Hancher's opening performers in 1972—back to Iowa for a series of seven free outdoor concerts. Named for the esteemed music venue in the heart of New Orleans's French Quarter, the Preservation Hall Jazz Band is a true national treasure. Hailed as "America's Best Traditional Jazz Band" by All About Jazz, the group has been a driving force in American music ever since its inception in 1961, counting jazz royalty like Jelly Roll Morton and Louis Armstrong among its distinguished alumni. Now in its 51st year, this national treasure continues to honor the dirty rags, mournful blues, and laid back swing that form jazz's legacy.

The concert will be set amidst the historic charm near the Formal Garden on the Brucemore estate. Gates open at 6:00 p.m. No on-site parking is available except handicap parking by entering on Dows Lane. Outside food and beverages are allowed; however, pets are not. For further information or a listing of other concert sites across the state, visit www.brucemore.org or call (319) 362-7375.

About Living with Floods project

The University of Iowa’s Hancher, College of Engineering, College of Education, Interdisciplinary Flood Institute, Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, Iowa Flood Center, iExploreSTEM, and State Hygienic Laboratory are partnering for this program. In keeping with the University of Iowa's mission of teaching, research, and service, this project aims to provide services to communities throughout the state. The project will commemorate the fifth anniversary of the 2008 flood, celebrate progress made towards recovery, and raise awareness of strategies to mitigate floods as well as of the interconnectedness of our environment and watershed. In addition to the partners listed above, this project is supported by Back to the River, Iowa Arts Council, and National Endowment for the Arts. For further information, visit www.hancher.uiowa.edu and www.iihr.uiowa.edu/livingwithfloods.

About Brucemore

Experience Brucemore, an unparalleled blend of tradition and culture, located at 2160 Linden Drive SE, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. At the heart of the historic 26-acre estate stands a nineteenth-century mansion filled with the stories of three Cedar Rapids families.  Concerts, theater, programs, and tours enliven the site and celebrate the heritage of a community.  For more information, call (319) 362-7375 or visit www.brucemore.org.

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News Release: Rock Island Public Library to Offer Downloadable Music PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Music & Entertainment
Written by Lisa Lockheart   
Thursday, 09 May 2013 14:21

(Rock Island, IL) Rock Island Public Library has joined Library Ideas™’ network of public library websites that offer access to over 3 million songs, including Sony Music’s catalog of legendary artists.

The Freegal™ Music Service will allow the Rock Island Public Library to increase the size and diversity of its music collection by offering access to over 10,000 music labels from 65 different countries.

Under the terms of the agreement, registered card holders of the Rock Island Public Library can download a select number of Freegal Music tracks in the MP3 format each month at no direct cost via the library website, www.rockislandlibrary.org.  The library will underwrite the purchase of the music.

Libraries all over the world subscribe to the Freegal Music Service, including the Princeton (NJ) Public Library, Maricopa County Library District (AZ), The Edmonton Public Library (AB), Orange County Public Library (FL), The Biblioteche di Bologna (IT), Nashville Public Library (TN) and Fairfield Public Library (CT).

The Freegal Music Service recently announced the availability of free mobile apps for registered cardholders of subscribing libraries.  The Freegal Music apps are available in the Apple® App Store and Google Play®.

“Sony Music has an incredibly expansive and popular catalog and we are really excited to partner with them on this, a very important product for libraries,” said Brian Downing, co-founder of Library Ideas.  “A library is a focal point of the community that requires many tools to excite people about library resources.  More than anything, that is the reason for the service.”

Facts about the Rock Island Public Library subscription to Freegal Music Service:
•       Users must have a Rock Island Public Library card in good standing.
•       Patrons will need their library card number and PIN to access the website.
•       Up to three (3) songs may be downloaded per patron per week.
•       Downloaded songs become part of the patron’s personal music library. They do not need to be returned, nor do they disappear after a set time-period.
•       Downloaded music will play on a variety of devices.

The library has scheduled a number of programs on using the downloadable music service. For details, visit www.rockislandlibrary.org, call 309-732-7323 (READ) or follow the Rock Island Library on Facebook and Twitter. A monthly calendar of library events is available online and at Rock Island Library locations.

For questions about using the Freegal Music Service, or other downloadable materials from the Rock Island Public Library, please contact the library’s Reference Desk at 309-732-7341.

About Library Ideas:   Library Ideas is a global leader in providing digital content to all kinds of libraries, and is located in Fairfax, Virginia.  The Company offers music, eBook and language learning solutions to libraries as part of its developing product suite.  Library Ideas was named “One of the Top 100 Companies in the Digital Content Industry for 2011-12” by EContent Magazine.

About Sony Music Entertainment

Sony Music Entertainment is a global recorded music company with a current roster that includes a broad  array of both local artists and international superstars. The company boasts a vast catalog that comprises some of the most important recordings in history. It is home to premier record labels representing music from every genre, including Arista Nashville, Beach Street Records, BNA Records, Columbia Nashville, Columbia Records, Day 1, Epic Records, Essential Records, Flicker Records, Kemosabe Records, LaFace Records, Legacy Recordings, MASTERWORKS, Polo Grounds, RCA Records, RCA Nashville, Reunion Records, Roc Nation, Sony Classical, Sony Music Latin, Star Time International, Syco Music, Verity Gospel Music Group, and Volcano Entertainment. Sony Music Entertainment is a wholly owned subsidiary of Sony Corporation of America.

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Mambo and Hip Hop Highlighted Next Week in America's Music Quad Cities PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Music & Entertainment
Written by Jennifer Christiansen   
Monday, 06 May 2013 14:05
The beat goes on as local libraries and non-profits continue to feature the uniquely American music genres that make up the soundtrack of our history.  The grant-funded series America's Music Quad Cities will feature films, discussion and dance on Mambo and Hip Hop beginning next week.

Davenport Public Library hosts the first screening and discussion session, featuring excerpts from the documentaries Latin Music U.S.A. and From Mambo to Hip Hop: A South Bronx Tale, on Monday May 13th, 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. at their Eastern Branch, 6000 Eastern Avenue.   On Thursday, May 16th, from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Western Illinois University-Quad Cities will host an encore screening and discussion of these films at the Riverfront Campus, at 3300 River Drive, Moline.  The featured documentaries focus on two seemingly different musical genres, making the connection between the popularity of Latin rhythms and its eventual influence on hip hop's Bronx origins.

On Wednesday, May 15th, at 7:00 p.m. the Davenport Public Library Eastern Branch will feature a Hip Hop dance performance from Midwest Academy of Dance.  With a 20 year history of teaching and performing, the Midwest Academy of Dance fosters a love of dance for those of all ages and abilities.  Their performance will offer participants the chance to learn some steps of their own.

As part of "America's Music: A Film History of Our Popular Music from Blues to Bluegrass to Broadway," project partners Bettendorf, Davenport, Moline and Rock Island Public Libraries, River Music Experience and Western Illinois University-Quad Cities have hosted documentary film screenings, scholar-led discussions of twentieth-century American popular music and live performances. Each week in the series covers a different musical style. After Mambo and Hip Hop, the project moves on to Swing Jazz.

The project concludes on May 23, from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m., with "Celebrating America's Music in the Quad Cities," a night of stories about Quad Cities music in the past 50 years and an open microphone event for local performers, at the Western Illinois University-Quad Cities Riverfront Atrium. A full list of performances and locations is available at www.americasmusicqc.com <https://svmplex1/exchweb/bin/redir.asp?URL=http://www.americasmusicqc.com/>

For more details, please contact This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or 309-524-2470.

"America's Music" is a project by the Tribeca Film Institute in collaboration with the American Library Association, Tribeca Flashpoint, and the Society for American Music. "America's Music" has been made possible by a major $2,500 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the Human Endeavor.

Additional funding for the Quad City effort was received from the Riverboat Development Authority, Sedona Technologies, UAW Local 2282, Friends of the Moline Public Library and Friends of the Rock Island Public Library, along with in-kind sponsorships from River Cities Reader, WQAD-TV Newschannel 8, STAR 93.5, WQPT Quad Cities PBS and WVIK Augustana Public Radio.


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Pete Seeger: Changing the World One Song at a Time PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Music & Entertainment
Written by John W. Whitehead   
Monday, 06 May 2013 13:58

“Any darn fool can make something complex; it takes a genius to make something simple.”—Pete Seeger

Before the Beatles or the Rolling Stones, Jim Hendrix, Bob Dylan and others, there was Pete Seeger. With his five-string banjo in hand, Seeger helped to lay the foundation for American protest music, singing out about the plight of everyday working folks and urging listeners to political and social activism. In fact, Pete Seeger is one of the most important musical influences of the 20th century.

Born in New York City on May 3, 1919, Seeger, whose father was a pacifist musicologist, was plunged into the world of music and politics from an early age. He studied sociology at Harvard University until 1938, when he dropped out and spent the summer bicycling through New England and New York, painting watercolors of farmers’ houses in return for food. Looking for but failing to get a job as a newspaper reporter in New York City, he then worked at the Archives of American Folk Music at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. In 1940, Seeger met Woody Guthrie at a Grapes of Wrath migrant-worker benefit concert. Seeger, Guthrie, Lee Hays and Millard Lampell joined together to form the Almanac Singers, which became known for its political radicalism and support of communism.

In 1942, Seeger was drafted by the U.S. Army and sent to Saipan in the Western Pacific. After the war, he helped start the People’s Songs Bulletin, later Sing Out! magazine, which combined information on folk music with social criticism. In 1950, Seeger formed The Weavers with Lee Hays, Ronnie Gilbert and Fred Hellerman. Targeted for the political messages behind some of their songs, the group was blacklisted and banned from television and radio.

In 1955, the House Committee on Un-American Activities subpoenaed Seeger to appear before them (read his testimony at http://www.peteseeger.net/HUAC.htm). During the hearings, Seeger refused to disclose his political views and the names of his political associates. When asked by the committee to name for whom he had sung, Seeger replied, “I am saying voluntarily that I have sung for almost every religious group in the country, from Jewish and Catholic, and Presbyterian and Holy Rollers and Revival Churches, and I do this voluntarily. I have sung for many, many different groups—and it is hard for perhaps one person to believe, I was looking back over the twenty years or so that I have sung around these forty-eight states, that I have sung in so many different places.” He was sentenced to one year in jail but, quoting the First Amendment, successfully appealed the decision after spending four hours behind bars. However, he has been blacklisted most of his life from normal radio and television work.

During the 1960s, Seeger traveled around the country, continuing to play his folk songs for the peace and civil rights movements. Deeply offended by the U.S. involvement in Vietnam, Seeger, along with other folk singers such as Joan Baez, led many protests.

“Wherever he was asked, when the need was the greatest, he, like Kilroy, was there. And still is,” said his long-time friend, Studs Terkel. “Though his voice is somewhat shot, he holds forth on that stage. Whether it be a concert hall, a gathering in the park, a street demonstration, any area is a battleground for human rights.”

In 1963, Seeger recorded the now-famous gospel song “We Shall Overcome.” In 1965, he sang it on the 50-mile walk from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, with Martin Luther King, Jr. and 1,000 other marchers. That song would go on to become the anthem for the civil rights movement and be translated into many languages. Seeger also turned his attention to cleaning up the Hudson River that ran past his home. In 1966, he helped form Clearwater, an organization dedicated to educating the public on environmental concerns such as pollution and protecting the river. The group offers educational programs for children on a 76-foot replica of a traditional Hudson cargo sloop and holds a two-day festival on the banks of the Hudson River every June.

Seeger was awarded the Presidential Medal of the Arts and the prestigious Kennedy Center Award in 1994. In 1996, he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame for his contribution to music and to the development of rock and folk music. In April of that year, he received the Harvard Arts Medal, and after decades of creating songs, in 1997, Seeger won a Grammy Award for Best Traditional Folk Album for his album, Pete.

Seeger, however, has not always been so lavishly praised. Often chastised for his “communist beliefs,” Seeger has dealt with criticism and misunderstanding. “I say I’m more conservative than Goldwater. He just wanted to turn the clock back to when there was no income tax. I want to turn the clock back to when people lived in small villages and took care of each other,” he says.

While many of the legendary men and women Seeger associated with are gone, he continues his political and environmental endeavors. He still seems to subscribe to the same philosophy he held to four decades ago, when he advised young people to follow their hearts and take initiative: “Well, here’s hoping all the foregoing will help you avoid a few dead-end streets (we all hit some), and here’s hoping enough of your dreams come true to keep you optimistic about the rest. We’ve got a big world to learn how to tie together. We’ve all got a lot to learn. And don’t let your studies interfere with your education.”

At 94 years old, Pete Seeger is still speaking out. Indeed, in an interview I conducted with Pete Seeger several years ago, I asked him whether he had found an answer to the question “When will they ever learn?” which he repeatedly posed in his song, “Where Have All the Flowers Gone.” Seeger’s response is one for the books:

We will never know everything. But I think if we can learn within the next few decades to face the danger we all are in, I believe there will be tens of millions, maybe hundreds of millions, of human beings working wherever they are to do something good. I tell everybody a little parable about the “teaspoon brigades.” Imagine a big seesaw. One end of the seesaw is on the ground because it has a big basket half full of rocks in it. The other end of the seesaw is up in the air because it’s got a basket one quarter full of sand. Some of us have teaspoons and we are trying to fill it up. Most people are scoffing at us. They say, “People like you have been trying for thousands of years, but it is leaking out of that basket as fast as you are putting it in.” Our answer is that we are getting more people with teaspoons every day. And we believe that one of these days or years—who knows—that basket of sand is going to be so full that you are going to see that whole seesaw going zoop! in the other direction. Then people are going to say, “How did it happen so suddenly?” And we answer, “Us and our little teaspoons over thousands of years.” But I don’t think we have forever. I now believe that all technological societies tend to self-destruct. The reason is that the very things that make us a successful technological society, such as our curiosity, our ambition and determination, will also cause us to fall.

John Adams and Thomas Jefferson corresponded for 13 years before they died on the same day. They asked, “How can one have prosperity without commerce? How can one have commerce without luxury? How can one have luxury without corruption? How can you have corruption without the end of the Republic?” And they really didn’t know the answer. Today I would ask, “How can one have a technological society without research? How can one have research without researching dangerous areas? How can one research dangerous areas without uncovering dangerous information? How can you uncover dangerous information without it falling into the hands of insane people who will sooner or later destroy the human race, if not the whole of life on earth?” Who knows? God only knows!

The Seeger interview in its entirety is available at www.rutherford.org.

 
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