Music & Entertainment
National Endowment for the Humanities Awards America’s Music Grant to Area Libraries PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Music & Entertainment
Written by Jennifer Christiansen   
Tuesday, 28 August 2012 12:15

The Bettendorf, Davenport, Moline, and Rock Island Public Libraries have been awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities grant to present the program America’s Music: A Film History of Our Popular Music from Blues to Bluegrass to Broadway.  As one of 50 grant recipients nationwide, these four libraries will feature public programs focusing on 20th century music genres that are uniquely American and how they are ingrained in our nation’s history and culture.

Scheduled for Spring 2013, America’s Music will consist of a six-week scholar-led viewing and discussion program. Among several renowned documentaries and television series included in the program are Martin Scorsese Presents the Blues, Broadway: the American Musical, Ken Burns’ Jazz, High Lonesome: The Story of Bluegrass Music, The History of Rock ‘n’ Roll, and Latin Music, USA.

Musical performances and other programming focused on America’s musical history will be provided in partnership with River Music Experience, Western Illinois University-Quad Cities, and WQPT.  Dan Malachuk, Associate Professor of English at Western Illinois University-Quad Cities, will serve as lead project scholar for the viewing and discussion series.

America’s Music: A Film History of Our Popular Music from Blues to Bluegrass to Broadway, was created by the Tribeca Film Institute with support from the National Endowment from the Humanities (NEH), and in consultation with the American Library Association (ALA) Public Programs Office and the Society for American Music.

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Three Additional Sprouts Acts to Perform in State Fair Talent Search Finals PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Music & Entertainment
Written by Lori Chappell   
Monday, 20 August 2012 14:49

DES MOINES, IA (08/18/2012)(readMedia)-- Three talented Sprout division acts (ages 2-12) have been selected to perform in the Championship round in Bill Riley's 53rd annual Iowa State Fair Talent Search. Each act will perform in exhibition on Sunday, August 19, but will no longer be competing.

The names, ages, hometowns and routines of the acts are:

Emma Destigter, 9, Moville, and Taylor Knaack, 10, Correctionville, Tap Dance

Ada Lund, 4, Corning, Dance

Alissa Marie Girsch, 12, Davenport, Vocal Solo

Bill Riley, Jr. is once again hosting the competition. Two Sprout acts will be crowned champions every day of the semi-finals. The six winning acts will perform in the talent-packed championship set for Sunday, August 19, at 1:30 p.m. on the Anne and Bill Riley Stage sponsored by Pepsi.

Each of the six Sprout Champions will receive a prize of $250 after the Championship Show. More than $15,000 will be awarded to the Senior and Sprout divisions combined.

"Nothing Compares" to the 2012 Iowa State Fair, August 9-19. The Fairgrounds are located at East 30th and East University Avenue, just 10 minutes east of downtown Des Moines, and are open 7 a.m. to 1 a.m. each day of the Fair. Exhibit hours may vary. For more information, call 800/545-FAIR or visit iowastatefair.org.

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Lt. Governor Simon statement on strip club legislation PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Music & Entertainment
Written by Kara Beach   
Monday, 20 August 2012 14:48

CHICAGO – August 18, 2012. Lt. Governor Sheila Simon today issued the following statement regarding Governor Pat Quinn’s signing of House Bill 1645, which will help fund rape crisis centers through fees based on strip club profits or admissions.

Simon said: “I thank Governor Quinn for standing up for rape victims and crisis centers across the state. This new revenue stream will help offset cuts that threatened critical services. When a sexual assault victim goes to a police station or a survivor calls a hotline, we need trained staff ready to respond. This bill helps to keep lights on and doors open, jobs filled and responders trained.”

Under the law, strip club owners can choose to pay the state on an annual basis a $3 per patron fee or opt to pay a flat fee based on the taxable receipts they report to the Illinois Department of Revenue each year. Clubs that report taxable receipts of $2 million or more would pay $25,000 a year; clubs that report taxable receipts of $500,000 to $2 million would pay $15,000; and clubs that report taxable receipts of less than $500,000 would pay $5,000, according to the new law.

The law goes into effect January 2013 and applies only to strip clubs that serve or permit alcohol consumption. It is projected to raise up to $1 million per year, or roughly one-sixth of what the state spends on sexual assault prevention and response annually. In fiscal year 2011, rape crisis centers in Illinois served more than 18,000 clients and reached nearly 475,000 people with prevention education.

The $3 per patron surcharge and fee structure was a compromise reached by rape crisis advocates, club owners and sponsors Sen. Toi Hutchinson (D-Chicago Heights) and Rep. Sara Feigenholtz (D-Chicago). The bill originally called for a $5 per patron entry fee.

“I would like to thank the Illinois Coalition Against Sexual Assault as well as Lt. Governor Sheila Simon for their constant and unwavering support for this new law,” Hutchinson said. “Victims of sexual assault must be able to access emergency services to fully recover from their traumatic experiences. I am hopeful the extra funding for sexual assault centers across Illinois will ensure no victim is turned away for care when they need it the most.”

The new revenue will go into the new Sexual Assault Services and Prevention Fund and be distributed by the Department of Human Services for community-based assistance to victims of sexual assault and sexual assault prevention.  There are at least 32 rape crisis centers serving Illinois residents – 10 in the Chicago-metro region and 22 in the non-metro area. State funding for the centers has decreased about 28 percent in the past five years, forcing many centers to cut counselors and/or create waiting lists for counseling services while demand for services increased. One center closed its doors.

Last year, the Texas Supreme Court upheld legislation that funded crisis centers through a $5 entrance fee at strip clubs that permit alcohol based on the correlation among alcohol, live nude dancing and negative secondary effects, such as sexual assault. The U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear a challenge of that decision, effectively opening the door for other cities and states to pursue similar measures.

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Dreaming of a Career in the Movies? PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Music & Entertainment
Written by Ginny Grimsley   
Friday, 17 August 2012 14:36
Hollywood Director Offers Tips for Hopeful Writers, Actors, Cameramen

From the box-office smash “The Avengers” to the summer hit “Madagascar 3” reigniting the 3-D craze, movie lovers are more enthralled than ever with film magic, and many fantasize about becoming a part of it. Their annual Westward migration from every film and acting and writing school in the country is as active as ever as they seek their chance to wield the Hollywood wand.

In such a competitive and crowded circus tent, how can a person ensure they catch that elusive trapeze?

Here are five tips from film director Guy Magar, picked up over 30 years making movies and TV shows and teaching through Action/Cut Filmmaking Seminars, the educational course he founded. Magar is also the author of the new Hollywood memoir and love story, Kiss Me Quick Before I Shoot, about his years in Hollywood which is a must-read for all who love movies (www.kissmequickbeforeishoot.com).

• Find out if you really love it. “The movie business demands passion and dedication; the work is difficult and exhausting, the journey fraught with disappointments and financial stress,” he says. “So you better find out if this is truly something you want and you’re ready to sacrifice whatever it takes.” The best place to do that is at a film school or a university filmmaking program. “This is where I fell in love with the cinema and forged my commitment to the craft,” he says.

• Find out if you’re any good at it. When you discover that less than 5 percent of the 125,000 actors in the Screen Actors Guild ever make a livable wage in any one year, the reality check about how competitive this business is can be quite intimidating, Magar says. So it’s not enough to love it – you have to have an aptitude for the craft if you want a chance at bat. “You better be one of the very best directors or writers or cameramen or actors wherever you’re studying and developing your work, so you can gain the self-confidence to throw your talent in a very crowded ring,” he says.

• Get your showreel ready! No one is going to hire you unless they can see what you can do. For a director, you better have an award-winning “wow” short. If you’re a writer, have some dazzling, unique screenplays. Actors need a great reel with diverse scenes showing range from comedy to drama. Cameraman? You need a reel that sizzles with cinematic visuals. Don’t come to Los Angeles without a reel. It shows who you are, what you can do — and why you’re worth paying to do it.

• Networking! Networking! Networking! “The movie business is first and foremost a people business,” Magar says. “Regardless of your talent, you better be good at schmoozing and an extrovert at heart.” It’s all about who you know, who can introduce you to whom, who likes you, who is willing to help you move forward, he says. If you’re a great networker, you have a better chance at a career than if you’re talented with no social skills. Introverts do not apply!

• Enjoy your journey or the dream will be a nightmare. Don’t put off having a life until you “get there,” he says. The big secret is to enjoy the journey and to have a life in the industry, regardless of the amount of work and accolades that may or may not come your way. You must commit to making a fulfilling life for yourself if you’re to find happiness in Tinseltown. Family, friends and a soulmate are as important and fulfilling as career gains. “They will sustain you in much deeper emotional ways than winning a spot on a softer toilet paper commercial,” he says.

Magar says his career in Hollywood was an exciting, gratifying one. “Between the words ‘action’ and ‘cut’, I get to make my magic … my visual storytelling,” he says. “I fell in love with making movies and have continued loving it for more than 100 production credits in my career.”

“If you share that passion to make film, have a terrific sense of humor to balance the obstacles, and can manage the five tips above, then welcome to Hollywood. Break a leg!”

About Guy Magar

Film and TV director/writer/producer Guy Magar has worked for more than 30 years in the motion picture industry. He recently published his Hollywood memoir, “Kiss Me Quick Before I Shoot: A Filmmaker’s Journey into the Lights of Hollywood and True Love.” His TV credits include “La Femme Nikita,” “The A-Team,” “Dark Avenger” and “Blue Thunder.” His feature films include “Lookin’ Italian,” “Stepfather 3,” “Children of the Corn: Revelation,” and the cult thriller “Retribution,” to be rereleased on DVD for its 25th anniversary this summer 2012. Magar has taught and inspired thousands of students through his Action/Cut Filmmaking Seminar, and his Action/Cut Short Film Competition is designed to discover and encourage new talent annually. He is a popular public speaker who inspires young filmmakers.

 
Five Sprout Acts Excel in State Fair Talent Search, Continue to Semi-Finals PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Music & Entertainment
Written by Lori Chappell   
Friday, 17 August 2012 13:56

DES MOINES, IA (08/15/2012)(readMedia)-- Five talented Sprout division acts (ages 2-12) have advanced to the semi-final round in Bill Riley's 53rd annual Iowa State Fair Talent Search. Each act will perform again on August 18.

The names, ages, hometowns and routines of the acts are:

Jessica Merta, 11, Pleasant Hill, Hula-Hoop

Levi Clegg, 7; Lillee Deike, 7; Alailah Perry, 8, all of Algona, Tap Dance

Julia Fritz, 11, Brighton, Vocal Solo

Aaron Van De Krol, 12, Lynnville, Magician

Emily Monroe, 11, Davenport; Josie Lindle, 10, Eldridge, Ballet/Hip Hop Dance

Bill Riley, Jr. is once again hosting the competition. Two Sprout acts will be crowned champions every day of the semi-finals. The six winning acts will perform in the talent-packed championship set for Sunday, August 19 at 1:30 p.m. on the Anne and Bill Riley Stage sponsored by Pepsi.

Each of the six Sprout Champions will receive a prize of $250 after the Championship Show. More than $15,000 will be awarded to the Senior and Sprout divisions combined.

"Nothing Compares" to the 2012 Iowa State Fair, August 9-19. The Fairgrounds are located at East 30th and East University Avenue, just 10 minutes east of downtown Des Moines, and are open 7 a.m. to 1 a.m. each day of the Fair. Exhibit hours may vary. For more information, call 800/545-FAIR or visit iowastatefair.org.

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