National Math Competition for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students Print
News Releases - Education & Schools
Written by Greg Livadas   
Monday, 18 November 2013 15:41

Middle school students will compete at Rochester Institute of Technology

Deaf or hard-of-hearing middle school students from across the country can participate in Rochester Institute of Technology’s sixth annual Math Competition for Students Who are Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing, April 4–6, 2014 at RIT’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf.

This competition for middle school students in 6th, 7th or 8th grades is designed to promote math as fun and engaging and features three rounds that test speed and accuracy, teamwork and additional math skills. Cash prizes will be awarded to team and individual winners in several categories. All participants will receive T-shirts and medals.

The first 25 schools that submit completed registration forms and payment, or payment authorizations, for either teams or individual students who want to compete, will be accepted to participate in the competition.

Registration will be closed when the 25-school limit is reached. The final registration deadline is Dec. 15, 2013.

Registration is $90 registration per team (four students) or $25 for students who register individually. Coaches and students wishing to participate in the next competition can get more information online at https://www.ntid.rit.edu/prospective/mathcompetition.

Parents and teachers are encouraged to accompany the students during the weekend, which offers fun and social activities in addition to the math competition.

For questions or more information, contact us at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , call 585-475-7695 or by videophone at 585-286-4555.

RIT is internationally recognized for academic leadership in computing, engineering, imaging science, sustainability, and fine and applied arts, in addition to unparalleled support services for deaf and hard-of-hearing students. RIT enrolls more than 18,000 full- and part-time students in more than 200 career-oriented and professional programs, and its cooperative education program is one of the oldest and largest in the nation.

NTID, one of nine colleges of RIT, was established by Congress in 1965 to provide college opportunities for deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals who were underemployed in technical fields. Today, 1,432 students attend NTID; more than 1,250 are deaf or hard of hearing. Others are hearing students enrolled in interpreting or deaf education programs. NTID’s Center on Employment assists NTID students with finding co-op and permanent jobs. More than 100 interpreters, tutors and notetakers support students in and out of the classroom. Visit: www.rit.edu/NTID.

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Rochester Institute of Technology is internationally recognized for academic leadership in business, computing, engineering, imaging science, liberal arts, sustainability, and fine and applied arts. In addition, the university offers unparalleled support services for deaf and hard-of-hearing students. RIT enrolls 18,000 full- and part-time students in more than 200 career-oriented and professional programs, and its cooperative education program is one of the oldest and largest in the nation.

For three decades, U.S. News & World Report has ranked RIT among the nation’s leading comprehensive universities. RIT is featured in The Princeton Review’s 2014 edition of The Best 378 Colleges, its Guide to 322 Green Colleges and The Fiske Guide to Colleges 2014.

To see more of RIT’s rankings and recognition, go to www.rit.edu/overview/rankings-and-recognition.

For RIT news, photos and videos, go to www.rit.edu/news.