Science & Technology
Grassley says anniversary of ANWR defeat and soaring gas prices emphasize need for domestic energy production PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Science & Technology
Written by Grassley Press   
Wednesday, 18 April 2012 12:34
WASHINGTON --- Senator Chuck Grassley said today that defeat of an amendment 10 years ago to allow more domestic energy production in Alaska was “enormously shortsighted” because today that oil would be driving down prices at the pump for consumers.

 

“It’s past time to take action to ramp up domestic production of traditional energy,” he said.  “In 2011, consumers spent a greater percentage of their household income on gasoline than any other year since 1981.  Affordable energy is a major economic issue.”

 

Grassley made his remarks on the 10-year anniversary of a Senate vote against legislation to open a tiny portion of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge – ANWR – to oil and gas development.  On April 18, 2002, the Democratic-controlled Senate defeated the domestic production initiative with many senators arguing that because it would take up to 10 years for the oil to reach the market ANWR was too far down the road to impact the energy supply or energy security.

 

“This missed opportunity should be a lesson.  We shouldn’t make the same mistakes again,” Grassley said.  “Greater domestic energy production would increase supply and help to lower prices.  It would create American jobs.  And it needs to start today.”

 

Grassley said the Obama administration has made things worse by restricting access to domestic energy sources.  “The President’s policies have prevented more oil production in the United States and resulted in higher prices, lost opportunities for job creation, and less energy security,” Grassley said.  “The President’s record contradicts his recent remarks that he’s for an all-of-the-above energy strategy.”

 

Citing Obama administration policies that restrict access to federal lands and permitting delays, regulatory threats to refiners, and the decision to deny the Keystone XL decision, Grassley said that by limiting domestic energy production, we have less supply and higher prices.

 

The complete text of Grassley’s statement today is below and includes comments made during the 2002 Senate debate about ANWR being ineffective because production would have taken 10 years.  Click here to watch the speech.

 

 

Floor Statement of U.S. Senator Chuck Grassley

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

 

Mr. President – Around the country, American consumers are paying near-record prices for gasoline at the pump.  The current average price for a gallon of gas is near $3.90 a gallon.  Since January 2009, the average price of a gallon of regular gasoline has more than doubled.  In 2011, consumers spent a greater percentage of their household income on gasoline than any other year since 1981.

 

Affordable energy is a major economic issue.  Paying nearly $4 for gas acts like a hidden tax and results in people having less money to spend on other things.  Rising energy prices also increase the cost of doing business for job creators and take away dollars that otherwise could go to hiring workers.

 

We should be doing everything possible to prevent these high energy prices.

 

The Senate had an opportunity ten years ago today to take action to increase our domestic oil supply.  Unfortunately, the Senate missed that opportunity.   Ten years ago today, the Senate considered an amendment offered by Senator Frank Murkowski to open a tiny portion of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil and gas development.  A vote on the cloture motion was rejected by the Democrat majority in the Senate on April 18, 2002.

 

During that debate, opponents argued that opening ANWR to development would never supply more than two percent of our nation’s oil demands.  They opposed it based on the belief that opening ANWR wouldn’t address the real problem, namely, our dependence on fossil fuels.  They said we needed to work toward a comprehensive approach.  Opening ANWR was also portrayed as a distraction from real solutions like conservation, alternative and renewable energy, and less environmentally sensitive fossil energy development.  Some even argued that fully-inflated or low-friction tires should be a larger part of our national energy policy.

 

I recognize the need for a comprehensive, balanced national energy policy.  I truly believe in an all-of–the-above approach that includes conservation, alternative and renewable energy, nuclear power and oil and gas development.  But the fact remains, we were talking about these policies as solutions to our energy problems in 2002, yet gas prices are still near $4 a gallon.

 

I listened to dozens of speakers who argued against opening ANWR because it wouldn’t address our near term energy needs.  They said it would take nearly ten years to get that oil to consumers.  Ten years ago we were told to forget about opening ANWR, because development was too far down the road to impact our energy supply or energy security.  Here a few quotes from my Democratic colleagues during that debate in April 2002:

 

·         “I oppose the proposal to drill in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.  Drilling in ANWR will not create energy independence, even if we started drilling tomorrow, the first barrel of crude oil would not make it to the market for at least ten years.  So it would not affect our current energy needs.”

 

·         “The oil exploration in ANWR will not actually start producing oil for as many as 10 years.  Exploring and drilling for oil is not forward thinking.”

 

·         “That oil would not be available for 10 years.  This means drilling in ANWR would not provide any immediate energy relief for American families.”

 

·         “Developing ANWR is simply not a necessary component of a progressive energy policy for this country.  For a period starting at about 2012, we would see an increase in domestic production under ANWR, if ANWR was open to development.  So, development would not address the near-term prices or shortages with which people are faced.”

 

·         “When my colleagues come to the floor of the Senate and suggest to us that the crisis in the Middle East is a reason to drill in ANWR, that is a misleading argument because no oil will flow from ANWR until from seven to 10 years from now.  That means if you open the refuge today, you are not going to see oil until about 2012, maybe a couple years earlier.”

 

·         “Oil extracted from the wildlife refuge would not reach refineries for seven to 10 years.”

 

The defeat of the Murkowski amendment back in 2002 was enormously short-sighted.  If we had voted to open ANWR ten years ago, that oil would be driving down prices at the pump for consumers today.  Time after time opponents of domestic oil production have argued that because it won’t lower prices at the pump today, it’s not worth doing.  Does anyone wonder if the American people today wish that the Senate had opened ANWR ten years ago?

 

It is past time to take action to ramp up domestic production of traditional energy.  Greater domestic energy production would increase supply and help to lower prices, and it would create American jobs.

 

President Obama continues to push policies that contribute to higher gas prices, including restricting access to federal lands and permit delays, regulatory threats to refiners, and his decision to deny the Keystone XL decision.  By limiting domestic energy production, we have less supply and higher prices.  The Obama administration has made things worse by restricting access to domestic energy sources.  The President’s record contradicts his recent remarks that he’s for an all-of-the-above strategy.  His policies have prevented more oil production in the United States and resulted in higher prices, lost opportunities for job creation, and less energy security.  President Obama’s denial of the Keystone XL pipeline inhibits energy-related development that could create 20,000 jobs.

 

Greater domestic energy production would increase supply and help to lower prices, and it would create American jobs.  It’s time to take action.

 

Denying ANWR development ten years ago was a mistake.  The Senate missed an opportunity ten years ago that would have brought gas price relief to consumers now.  We shouldn’t make the same mistakes today.

 

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Quad City Company Assists ISU Students in the Installation of a New Green Roof PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Science & Technology
Written by Jake Glimco   
Friday, 13 April 2012 15:17

ISU installing Student-Funded Green Roof atop Memorial Union

Project illustrates the student body’s commitment to sustainability

 

AMES, IA / April 9, 2012 – Students are helping turn Iowa State University’s Memorial Union’s roof green, both literally and figuratively.  In a bold move that echoes the origins of an Iowa State University landmark student center, ISU’s Government of the Student Body (GSB) has agreed to allocate funds from the mandatory student activity fee to help install a green roof that had been planned for the center, but had not previously been funded. On April 13th, volunteer students from ISU’s Landscape and Horticulture Clubs and the Green Umbrella organization will install an 855-square foot green roof under the supervision of LiveRoof® Certified Installer Central States Roofing of Ames.  The project promises to be both educational and functional:  providing hands-on experience with a leading green technology, while reducing the university’s operating expenses and storm water runoff.  In addition, this LiveRoof® Hybrid Green Roof System project, grown by Roof Top Sedums of Davenport, Iowa, will instantly add a beautiful habitat to what until now has been a barren rooftop.  ISU’s Memorial Union was built in the 1920’s entirely through private donations from students, alumni and other supporters as a memorial to Iowa State students and alumni who died in World War I.

The Memorial Union project was the brain-child of ISU senior Miles Thompson of Cedar Rapids, who studies green roof technology under ISU Horticulture Lecturer Jennifer Bousselot, of DeWitt, IA.  Thompson so enjoyed working on another green roof on campus that he sought out and advocated for other suitable green roof sites at ISU.  When he learned that a green roof had been planned for the Memorial Union, but funding hadn’t been approved, he took it upon himself to bring the issue to the GSB, which allocated funds from student activity fees to finance what MU couldn’t.  “I just really wanted to make a difference and turn this into a teaching opportunity for fellow students and a lasting testament to the importance that ISU students place on sustainability.”   Lecturer Bousselot adds, “The passion these students have for this project is powerful.  I’m so impressed with what they’ve been able to make happen for ISU.”

The colorful mix used in ISU’s latest project features hardy, drought-tolerant groundcover plants, which display a variety of colors and textures, even during the fall and winter months.  Besides being beautiful, the green roof’s vegetation soaks up rainfall and reduces storm water runoff.  The green roof helps reduce rooftop temperatures during summer, thereby protecting and extending the life of the roof membrane.  Green roofs are estimated to double the life of roofing materials and they work as insulation to reduce heating and cooling costs.  In addition to using plants that are well-established in soil specially engineered for the extremes of a rooftop environment, the LiveRoof® System also features a patent-pending hybrid design combining the best features of all green roof systems. The LiveRoof® System reduces labor costs to maintain compared to most systems, and because the established plants thrive  as their own living mulch.

This project is particularly meaningful to Roof Top Sedums founders Roxanne Nagel and Teresa Nelson.  Both are ISU alums; Nagel graduated with BS in Horticulture (’99) and Nelson with a Bachelors in Landscape Architecture (’87).  Nagel adds, “We’re honored that the institution that helped instill our passion for the environment will now use this product to teach the next generation about green roof technology.”

About Roof Top Sedums: Roof Top Sedums was established in 2007 and is a Regional LiveRoof® Licensed Grower servicing Iowa, Western Illinois, Eastern Nebraska, Eastern Kansas, and most of Missouri.  The business is 100% women-owned and certified nationally as a Women’s Business Enterprise as well as an Iowa Targeted Small Business.  For more information on projects previously grown by Roof Top Sedums or information about the LiveRoof® System, visit www.rooftopsedums.com.

 
Moms Night Out Spreads STEM Education in Second Year PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Science & Technology
Written by Tonja Richards   
Wednesday, 11 April 2012 08:48
(CEDAR FALLS, Iowa – April 10, 2012) The Iowa Mathematics and Science Education Partnership (IMSEP) will offer Moms Night Out for STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics), a satellite event for the second USA Science & Engineering Festival, at 27 sites across Iowa on the evening of April 23, 2012.

Moms Night Out for STEM (MNOS) was a brainstorm by IMSEP and the Iowa State University - College of Engineering to inspire primary caretakers, particularly moms, to get 'hands on' with their children's math and science education.

The two inspirations for MNOS events are the importance of STEM in the future success of today’s youth and the importance of moms (as well as dads and other caregivers) in shaping their child’s self image and interest in STEM.

“Parents figure prominently in the equation for children to see STEM careers in a more positive and desirable light,” said Jeff Weld, Director of IMSEP. “Moms Night Out for STEM gives parents and caretakers the opportunity to embrace STEM as a pursuit for their children’s future, rather than a scary subject they didn’t like in school.”

A typical Moms Night Out for STEM event may kick off with a keynote by a local STEM professional who may discuss the many ways parents influence children’s interest in and attitude toward science and mathematics. Hands-on activities for adults designed to be done at home and other activities and sharing of resources will round out the evening.

“STEM education is so important for the future of our state, country and world. Our youth will be faced with solving and innovating worldwide challenges such as having enough clean water, sustainable energy, safe food practices, and more,” said Camille Sloan-Schroeder of Iowa State College of Engineering. “With parents and caregivers being the most influential people in a child’s life, we hope to create an environment where they can get the tools they need to inspire the next generation of innovators.”

Iowa's Moms Night Out for STEM satellite event is one of dozens of events conducted across the nation in celebration of the second USA Science & Engineering Festival, to be held in Washington D.C. on April 28-29, 2012. Types of organizations participating in this event include museums, schools, labs and libraries where moms and other caregivers can go to network and learn the best ways to inspire a love of STEM in their children.

Twenty-seven events occurring simultaneously across the state on one night would not be possible without the help many volunteers and with the support of premiere sponsor, John Deere, with promotional support from Iowa Public Television (IPTV).

This event is free and open to the public.  A list of Moms Night Out for STEM locations is listed below. To register for the event nearest you, visit http://www.iowamathscience.org/registration-MNOS-2012 .

* * *

Participating Moms Night Out for STEM events.

City

Location

Contact

Contact Information

Ames

Iowa State University College of Engineering –  Marston Hall Atrium – ISU Campus

Camille Sloan Schroeder - Manager - Iowa State University Engineering Pre-collegiate Programs

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

515-294-9965

Ankeny

Iowa Labs Facility – DMACC Campus –  
2006 S Ankeny Blvd

Brindusa Velica or Marla Staude

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
515.725.1600

Atlantic

Cass County Community Center – 805 W 10th St

Susan Oliver – Cass County Extension

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

712-243-1132

Burlington

Burlington Public Library – 210 Court Street

Angela Pilkington

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .us

319.753.1647

Cedar Falls

Cedar Falls Public Library –   
524 Main Street

Sheryl McGovern

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

319.268.5541

Cedar Rapids

Mount Mercy University –  1330 Elmhurst Drive NE

Dr.  Elizabeth Kleiman, Mount Mercy University

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

319-363-1323 x1289

Cedar Rapids

Science Station - Lindale Mall – Suite 200 
4444 First Avenue NE

Norah Hammond, General Manager & Education Director

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

319.363.4629

Co-hosting MNOS event with Rockwell Collins Child Development Center Rockwell Collins

Coralville

Iowa Children’s Museum –  1451 Coral Ridge Ave.

Deb Dunkhase, Executive Director

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

319.625. 6255 ext. 210

 

Council Bluffs

New Horizon Presbyterian Church –  30 Valley View Drive

Natalie Harris   - Girl Scouts of Greater Iowa,

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
712.328.2338

Davenport

The Putnam Museum –
1717 W. 12th St.

Nichole Myles, Director of Education

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

563.324.1054 ext. 210

Des Moines

The Science Center of Iowa – 401 West MLK Jr. Pkwy.

Kimberly Peterson, Preschool Director

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

515.274.6868 ext. 203

Des Moines

Blank Park Zoo –  7401 SW 9th Street

Anne Shimerdla, Director of Operations and Education

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

515.974.2573

Dubuque

Mazzuchelli Middle School –
2005 Kane St

Amy Jones, Electrical Engineer, John Deere Dubuque Works

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Fontanelle

Nodaway Valley Middle School–  112 First Street

Deb Hall,  Adair County Extension Office

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

641.743.8412

Fort Dodge

Fort Dodge Public Library – 424 Central Avenue

Tonya Martinson, Girl Scouts of Greater Iowa

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

1.800.798.8141

Holstein

Ridgeview Community School  –  519 E Maple Street

Rita Frahm, Ida County Economic Development

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

712.371.9438

Mason City

Music Man Square –  308 South Pennsylvania Avenue

Gail Castillo - ISU Extension and Outreach - Cerro Gordo County

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

641.423.0844

Milford

Iowa Lakeside Laboratory –  Dickinson County –  1838 HWY 86

Jane Shuttleworth, Education Coordinator

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

712.337.3669 ext. 7

Muscatine

Muscatine High School
2705 Cedar Street

Tim Bower, John Deere

Email: BowerTimothyW@JohnDeere.com
Work Phone:  (309) 756-1131

Ottumwa

Indian Hills Community College – Advanced Tech Bldg – Room 122

Marsha Parker, John Deere Ottumwa Works

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

641.683.2494

(Daycare available)

Sioux City

 

Sioux City Public Library  Morningside Branch – 4005 Morningside Avenue

Jeanette Bobeen, Youth Services Manager

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

712.255.2933 ext. 231

Storm Lake

Storm Lake Public Library –  609 Cayuga Street

Elizabeth Huff, Youth Director

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .ia.us

712.732.8026

Bi-lingual Activities

Traer

North Tama Elementary  –
605 Walnut Street

Lisa Chizek, 5-6 grade science teacher

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

319.478.2265

 

Wapello

Louisa County Extension Office
317 Van Buren St

Tessa Pugh, Louisa County 4-H Youth Coordinator

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
319-523-2371

Washington

Washington Public Library
115 W. Washington Street

Ted Neal, University of Iowa - College of Education

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Telephone: 319.560.5401

 

Waterloo

George Washington Carver Academy – 1505 Logan Avenue

Albert Wiggins, Associate Principal

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
319.433.2501

Waterloo

Bluedorn Science Imaginarium –
503 South Street

Jordan Walker,
Science Educator

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

319-233-8708

 

* * *

The Iowa Mathematics and Science Education Partnership (IMSEP) is the operations arm of the Governor’s STEM Advisory Council created to promote excellence in science and mathematics education and application in technology and engineering with the help of STEM education stakeholders across Iowa. For more information, contact the IMSEP office at (319) 273-2959 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or visit www.iowamathscience.org.

 
Iowa Wind Energy is Rock Solid PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Science & Technology
Written by Elisha Smith   
Tuesday, 10 April 2012 11:47

By Paul Mansoor, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , Center for Rural Affairs

Wind development in Iowa is on the upswing.

The Rock Island Clean Line is a transmission project that will help transform rural economies in the upper Midwest, like Iowa.

Clean Line, the developers behind Rock Island, are placing a converter station in O’Brien County, IA that will transform harvested wind-energy into high-voltage direct current (HVDC).

Traditionally relying on agri-business, O’Brien County’s economic interests have embraced the potential of renewable energy. Like many rural areas in the upper Midwest, O’Brien County has stellar wind-resources, but lacks a way to send that harvested energy anywhere. This bottleneck often stalls wind-farm development, costing jobs, tax revenues and renewable energy potential.

O’Brien County’s Economic Development Corporation supports the line and understands it offers tremendous economic development opportunity.

With a direct path for harvested wind-energy, wind-farms will quickly sprout within 100 miles of the converter station. This will mean manufacturing jobs (producing wind turbines), skilled labor (installing turbines and transmission infrastructure), and permanent positions to monitor and maintain the line after it’s built.

Delivering 3,500 megawatts of electricity from the Great Plains eastward, the Rock Island line will create an estimated 5,000 construction jobs during the building phase, and over 500 operations jobs once the line is complete.

The Center for Rural Affairs supports clean transmission that bolsters wind energy development, bringing economic and environmental benefits to rural America. The Rock Island Line is a step in the right direction--just ask O’Brien County.

Follow Rock Islands’ progress and learn more about transmission: http://www.cfra.org/clean-energy-transmission-map.

###

 
Green Certification to Quad Cities Launderer PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Science & Technology
Written by Ken Koepper   
Monday, 02 April 2012 08:03
Crescent Healthcare Laundry Earns TRSA Clean Green Certification

ALEXANDRIA, Va., March 30, 2012—Crescent Laundry, Davenport, IA, has been certified Clean Green by TRSA, which is leading the textile services industry to new heights in sustainability and environmental protection by establishing this international standard. Crescent has met TRSA’s requirements for achieving efficiencies in water and energy conservation and adopting best management practices for reusing, reclaiming and recycling resources.

Crescent Laundry is one of the first five laundry processing companies in the country to qualify for the certification.

The certification gives Crescent’s business-to-business customers third-party verification that the sheets, towels, uniforms, and other reusable textiles they procure from the company are laundered in an environmentally friendly manner.

“Contracting with Crescent for textile services is a statement of conscientiousness about natural resources and a commitment to sustainability,” stated Joseph Ricci, TRSA president and CEO. “Choosing a Clean Green laundry is part of managing a supply chain with maximum environmental protection in mind.”

More business owners and operators are modifying their production technologies, processes and work habits to improve efficiency and conserve supplies, Ricci observed. “Clean Green prompts them to consider how their choices of outsourced functions such as laundry affect their total environmental impact,” he added.

Businesses that opt for work uniform rental service and linen supply from textile services companies—as opposed to assigning staff to wash work clothes at home or using smaller on-premises or commercial laundries for linens—have chosen the superior route for minimizing natural resources depletion.

TRSA’s new certification helps organizations find the best choices in this respect. Laundry facilities such as Crescent’s with the highest-speed, largest-capacity equipment are most likely to exceed Clean Green standards due to such machinery’s energy and water efficiencies. Just as important, because these industrial-scale laundries have hundreds or even thousands of customers, these facilities are large enough to economically deploy the latest technologies for removing pollutants, recovering heat, reusing rinse water and other resource-saving functions.

Based in Davenport, Crescent serves Eastern Iowa and Western and Central Illinois health care providers, including acute care, outpatient care and long-term care facilities. Crescent processes more than 8 million pounds of laundry each year.

"Crescent is proud to be recognized for a commitment we have made to reduce our environmental impact and to create efficiencies in our use of water, energy and cleaning materials. These strategies will benefit our customers and residents of Davenport in the long term,'' said Rick Kislia, manager of Crescent Laundry.

Crescent was founded in 1917.  The company became part of Genesis Health System in 1994 when the system was created by the merger of St. Luke's and Mercy hospitals.

About TRSA and the Textile Services Industry

Based in Alexandria, Va., TRSA represents the $16-billion textile services industry that employs nearly 200,000 people at more than 2,000 facilities nationwide. These companies provide laundered textiles and other products and services that help businesses project a clean and attractive public image. The industry reaches every major business and industrial region, Congressional district and city in the country. Most Americans benefit at least once a week from the cleanliness and safety provided by the industry—through its laundering and delivery of reusable linens, uniforms, towels, mats and other products for the healthcare, hospitality and industrial/manufacturing sectors. TRSA member companies’ services minimize environmental impacts on air, water and solid waste disposal while reducing costs for millions of customers.

 
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