Simon-supported math bill approved by Senate committee Print
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Written by Kara Beach   
Tuesday, 27 March 2012 12:51

Statewide curriculum aims to increase college completion

 

SPRINGFIELD – March 27, 2012. Illinois middle and high schools could use a state recommended math curriculum come 2013, if a bill that passed a state Senate committee today with Lt. Governor Sheila Simon’s support is adopted.

 

SB 3244, sponsored by Sen. Michael Frerichs (D-Champaign), authorizes the Illinois State Board of Education to design curriculum models that illustrate how to teach state standards in middle and high school math. Schools could opt to follow the state-recommended scope and sequence of study for math and math equivalent courses through a student’s final year of high school, or continue to follow local curricula.

 

Within four years of the bill’s effective date, the state board and P-20 Council will measure the effectiveness of the statewide curriculum based on test scores and math remediation needs at colleges. The aim is to recommend a standard curriculum that is proven to boost college readiness and reduce the expensive and time-consuming remedial math needs at colleges and universities.

 

“Students learn locally, but they compete globally,” Simon said. “Colleges and employers are telling us that too many of our students are not competing in math. Our goal is to recommend math content and teaching techniques that educators across the state, in all zip codes, can build on so that more of their students graduate from high school ready for college and careers.”

 

In 2011, 42 percent of high school graduates met the math college readiness benchmark, according to ACT. More than one-third of recent high school graduates who transitioned as full-time community college freshmen between 2006-08 enrolled in at least one remedial math course (17,527 out of 48,328 students), according to the Illinois Community College Board. Students who enroll in remedial courses are more likely to drop out or graduate late.

 

Simon said the optional statewide curriculum moves away from simply requiring “seat time” to promoting use of that time wisely. It could be most helpful to teachers in districts that cannot afford curriculum directors or curriculum committees. It will also provide guidance to districts that otherwise rely on textbook manufacturers that claim their materials are aligned with state standards.

 

SB 3244 passed 10-0 and awaits a vote by the full Senate. Simon’s written testimony can be found here.

 

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