Stage & Theatre
Don’t miss the area premiere of the Broadway thriller A Steady Rain at Riverside Theatre PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Stage & Theatre
Written by Sarah Burnett   
Friday, 23 March 2012 13:53

Iowa City, IA – Don’t miss the area premiere of the gritty and complex Broadway thriller, A Steady Rain by Keith Huff, directed by Joseph Price at Riverside Theatre.

A Steady Rain opens Friday, March 30 and runs through Sunday, April 15 and features local actors Martin Andrews and Jim Van Valen.

Chicago cops Joey and Denny are lifelong best friends and partners on the beat until a chain of events spirals out of control and threatens to change not only their lives, but their friendship forever.

“It's a story about a relationship under threat -- and how brotherhood and loyalty are brought into question when the battle lines between ‘us’ and ‘them’ become blurred,” said Van Valen, who plays Denny.

A Steady Rain contains strong language and adult content.

Performances are Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m.

Tickets are $28 for adults, $25 for 60 and over/30 and under, $15 for youth (18 and under).

Tickets can be purchased online at www.riversidetheatre.org or by phone at (319) 338-7672. The Riverside Theatre Box Office is located at 213 N Gilbert St, Iowa City. Box office hours are: 12 – 4 p.m. Monday – Friday and 1 hour before performances.

###

 
Is "Pink Slime" safe? Do animals need antibiotics? Experts respond. PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Stage & Theatre
Written by Best Food Facts   
Friday, 23 March 2012 12:40

Latest Poll

Food Fight Poll: "Pink Slime"

What are your thoughts on lean finely textured beef (“pink slime”)?

Take our latest poll!

***

What's Cookin'?

Recently we’ve talked with University-based food experts/researchers about these topics

Does Size Matter in Sustainable Food?
Our experts debate the correlation between the size of a farm and whether it sustainably produces food.

The Truth About “Pink Slime”
Dr. James Dickson explains the process behind Lean Finely Textured Beef and whether our beef is safe.

Do Fatty Foods Cause Brain Damage?
Dr. Melinda Sothern explains why it's important to watch what you and your children eat.

Consumer Questions: White Goo on Chicken - What Is It?
Dr. Casey Owens and Dr. Don Conner answer a reader's question about chicken breasts.

Antibiotics For Animals: Dangerous for Humans?
Dr. Peter Davies and Dr. Scott Hurd explain why antibiotics are fed to livestock and whether that causes human health risks.

"Pink Slime" in Chicken Nuggets?
Dr. Casey Owens explains what mechanically separated chicken is and why it is used.

We Bet You Didn't Know... Interesting Food Facts
We've gathered some interesting facts from our food system experts.

Check out all the Food for Thought posts!

***

Meet Our Featured Expert!

Dr. Ethan Bergman, PhD, RD, CD, FADA, is the associate dean in the College of Education and Professional Studies and professor of food science and nutrition at Central Washington University. He was named CWU Distinguished University Professor in 2001-02 and was named by the Washington State Dietetic Association as Outstanding Registered Dietitian of the Year in 2000. He is the president-elect of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. He is a past delegate and the immediate past-speaker of the Academy's House of Delegates. Bergman is a former high school biology, physics, mathematics and computer science teacher and a former volleyball and wrestling coach. He has served on the Academy's Educator's Task Force on Education Reform in Dietetics Education and on the Evidence-Based Practice Committee. A graduate of Linn-Benton Community College and Eastern Oregon State College, Bergman received master's degrees in biology from the University of Oregon and in interdisciplinary studies in biology, general studies and education from Western Oregon State College. Bergman earned his doctorate from Washington State University. He has helped Best Food Facts answer the question, Salt: How Much Is Too Much?.

***
***

Coming Right Up!

Best Food Facts readers asked questions – and our experts will be providing answers! Look for these topics to be covered soon!

  • What are farmers doing to grow healthier food? What technologies are being used?
  • Water: What's the magic number? How much water should you drink per day?
  • Do beef cattle secrete synthetic hormones?

Have a food question you'd like answered? Click here to ask our experts!

***

Want to sign up for our newsletter? Fill out our sign up form!

 
Hire U.S. Workers First, Restore Integrity of U.S. Visa System PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Stage & Theatre
Written by Grassley Press   
Thursday, 22 March 2012 12:53

by U.S. Senator Chuck Grassley

 

With spring just around the corner, many Iowans look forward to seasonal rites of passage this time of year.  Farmers are itching to get in the fields. Home gardeners anticipate the first shoots of peas and lettuce.  Spring cleaning tops the to-do list for many families.  School students give thanks for Spring Break.  And, soon-to-be-college graduates have their sights set on landing a job.

 

It’s no secret the Class of 2012 needs to break into a job market struggling to rebound from Wall Street’s financial meltdown and mortgage industry mess.  The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports the unemployment rate is idling at 8.3 percent. This year’s crop of graduates also will be competing with more than five million jobless Americans who have been looking for work for longer than six months.

 

Yet, the Obama administration has proposed federal rules to “attract and retain highly skilled immigrants” that arguably increase the competition for Americans who are looking for work.

 

Is this really the administration’s idea of priming the employment pump?

 

In Iowa, civic and business leaders work together in their communities to grease the wheels for economic development.  From Council Bluffs to Keokuk, local economic development leaders search for ways to attract and keep businesses.  They go to bat for their towns because they know their labor pool is ready and willing to work.

 

So, flooding the employment market with foreign workers, when high-skilled Americans are seeking jobs at unprecedented levels, just doesn’t square with improving the home team advantage, let alone fostering a level playing field.

 

From my leadership position on the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee, I have championed reforms to the nation’s immigration and visa laws to better protect the pool of highly-skilled, unemployed U.S. workers and graduates who struggle to find good-paying jobs here at home.

 

For example, the H1-B visa program was created in 1990 as a temporary measure to help companies in America find high-technology workers -- assuming specialized workers aren’t available in the United States to fill these jobs.  After more than two decades on the books, the program needs better controls and stronger oversight that will prevent qualified American workers from being passed over for good-paying jobs.

 

That’s why over the last several years I’ve introduced an H-1B visa reform bill that would require a good faith recruitment of American workers by all companies seeking to bring in foreign workers, change the wage requirements to ensure that visa holders are not undercutting American workers, give more authority to the Department of Labor to investigate allegations of fraud, prohibit employers from advertising only to H-1B visa holders, and increase penalties for those who violate the terms of the H-1B visa program.

 

Working with Sen. Dick Durbin of Illinois, I’ve also urged the administration to formally adopt the standards set by the U.S. Department of State and the Administrative Appeals Office of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services when adjudicating L-1B visas (a visa that allows employers to transfer its existing workers to the U.S. if they have “specialized” or “advanced” knowledge of the company).  Unfortunately, the Obama administration is considering changes to the L-1B visa program that could water down these standards and allow the L-1B visa program to be used as a back door to evade restrictions of the H-1B visa program, putting American workers at a disadvantage.

 

Out-of-work Americans and graduates of the Class of 2012 have enough hurdles to overcome.  The nation’s visa system should not undermine their chances of landing a good-paying job.

 

March 19, 2012


 
Culver-Stockton College theatre presents "Assassins" PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Stage & Theatre
Written by Culver-Stockton College Communications   
Tuesday, 20 March 2012 12:04

CANTON, MO. (03/16/2012)(readMedia)-- Culver-Stockton College theatre students will take the stage March 29, 30 and April 1 for their production of "Assassins." This bold, original, surreal, disturbing, thought-provoking and alarmingly funny production is perhaps the most controversial musical ever written and is rated R for language and adult content. This most American of musicals lays bare the lives of nine individuals who assassinated or tried to assassinate the President of the United States, in a one-act historical "revusical" that explores the dark side of the American experience. From John Wilkes Booth to Lee Harvey Oswald, Stephen Sondheim and John Weidman bend the rules of time and space, taking us on a nightmarish rollercoaster ride in which assassins and would-be assassins from different historical periods meet, interact and in an intense final scene inspire each other to harrowing acts in the name of the American Dream.

Cast members for the production include:

Ian Sodawasser, a sophomore musical theatre major from Davenport, Iowa.

Kirsten Sindelar, a junior musical theatre major from Sherrard, Ill..

The production will open March 29 7:30 p.m. in the Mabee Little Theatre inside the Robert W. Brown Performing Arts Center. Additional performances will be held March 30-31 at 7:30 p.m. and April 1 at 3 p.m.

Tickets are $6 for adults. Admission is free with Culver-Stockton College identification.

 
Take a Child to Theatre Day is today March 20th PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Stage & Theatre
Written by TYA USA   
Tuesday, 20 March 2012 09:40

ASSITEJ theatres (TYA/USA) celebrate World Day for Theatre for Children and Young People on March 20

February 14, 2012--Every year, ASSITEJ, the international association of theatre for children and young people (which works in 85 countries across the world), celebrates the World Day for Theatre for Children and Young People on 20 March. The United States ASSITEJ center is called TYA/USA. For the next three years, the global association will be uniting theatres across the world in conveying one message: "Take a child to the theatre today".

"ASSITEJ SA is bringing corporates on board to sponsor children to attend theatre, and we ask companies and receiving houses to open their doors on 20 March to children, young people, and their families," says Yvette Hardie, director of ASSITEJ SA and president of ASSITEJ International. "The 'Take a child to the theatre today' campaign goes to the heart of what ASSITEJ is all about, working to ensure that all children and young people have access to the arts."

Each year, a world leader or artist in theatre for young people is asked to write the message for the ASSITEJ World Day. This year, it will be French-Canadian playwright Suzanne Lebeau. Gcina Mhlope, as well as the Ministers of Arts and Culture, Basic Education and Women, Children and Persons with Disabilities will also be invited to add their voices to the campaign.

 
<< Start < Prev 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 Next > End >>

Page 115 of 145