Travel & Tourism
LeClaire is Truly the Coolest Small Town in America PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Travel & Tourism
Written by Cindy Bruhn   
Monday, 04 February 2013 15:06
LeClaire, Iowa's town motto "It's all there... In LeClaire" appears to hold true. With increasing growth in retail, attractions and housing, LeClaire has gained national attention and become a model community for many other small towns throughout the Midwest. With an increase in visitors to LeClaire, hotel/motel tax collections increased approximately 18% from 2011 to 2012. With growth and diversity of many new retail stores, attractions and restaurants, retail sales tax increased approximately 25% during the same time frame. As a small town with no large industrial base for tax support, LeClaire has managed to be successful with tourism as their cornerstone of growth in a down economy.

City Administrator, Ed Choate, attributes this success to “creating a business friendly atmosphere that encourages entrepreneurship and risk taking.”

A new business that was launched during the down economy in 2010, Mississippi River Distilling Co., owned by brothers Ryan and Garrett Burchett is thriving and already expanding. Ryan says their growth has been spurred by “a genuine entrepreneurial spirit that is encouraged and supported by the community and its leaders.”

Former LeClaire Chamber President and revitalization expert, Dr. Rick Reed, attributes LeClaire's success to its spirit of community and strength in volunteers. “LeClaire’s rich history and recent downtown revitalization in 2007 helped lay the foundation for future growth and expansion. In many small communities, the downtown is the location for important human interaction, business development, culture, and history. The identity of a small community is closely tied to the sustained development of commercial area revitalization. This always stimulates the local economy through planned economic development and growth. In LeClaire, the success of the historic downtown area is a vital link to its future”.

For more information, please contact Cindy Bruhn at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 
LeClaire is Truly the Coolest Small Town in America PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Travel & Tourism
Written by Cindy Bruhn   
Monday, 04 February 2013 15:06
LeClaire, Iowa's town motto "It's all there... In LeClaire" appears to hold true. With increasing growth in retail, attractions and housing, LeClaire has gained national attention and become a model community for many other small towns throughout the Midwest. With an increase in visitors to LeClaire, hotel/motel tax collections increased approximately 18% from 2011 to 2012. With growth and diversity of many new retail stores, attractions and restaurants, retail sales tax increased approximately 25% during the same time frame. As a small town with no large industrial base for tax support, LeClaire has managed to be successful with tourism as their cornerstone of growth in a down economy.

City Administrator, Ed Choate, attributes this success to “creating a business friendly atmosphere that encourages entrepreneurship and risk taking.”

A new business that was launched during the down economy in 2010, Mississippi River Distilling Co., owned by brothers Ryan and Garrett Burchett is thriving and already expanding. Ryan says their growth has been spurred by “a genuine entrepreneurial spirit that is encouraged and supported by the community and its leaders.”

Former LeClaire Chamber President and revitalization expert, Dr. Rick Reed, attributes LeClaire's success to its spirit of community and strength in volunteers. “LeClaire’s rich history and recent downtown revitalization in 2007 helped lay the foundation for future growth and expansion. In many small communities, the downtown is the location for important human interaction, business development, culture, and history. The identity of a small community is closely tied to the sustained development of commercial area revitalization. This always stimulates the local economy through planned economic development and growth. In LeClaire, the success of the historic downtown area is a vital link to its future”.

For more information, please contact Cindy Bruhn at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 
Black History Month - Explore Missouri's Rich Heritage PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Travel & Tourism
Written by Tom Uhlenbrock   
Thursday, 31 January 2013 14:29
Jefferson City, Mo. — The Duck Room is a basement nightclub at Blueberry Hill restaurant in the Delmar Loop area of St. Louis. But one night each month, it becomes a living history museum with a performance by rock music pioneer Chuck Berry.

“He’s by far our most famous citizen,” says Joe Edwards, owner of the restaurant and music club that anchors the six-block entertainment and shopping district. “He was the first poet laureate of rock ‘n’ roll. Not only did he write his own songs, but he was a heckuva guitar player. Still is.”

February marks Black History Month, and Missouri has its share of important figures, from Dred Scott and George Washington Carver to jazz and ragtime musicians and Negro League baseball players. Their museums create an interesting itinerary for observing the special month. But you might also consider a stop at the Duck Room.

At age 86, Berry still performs his signature hits, and does the impromptu duck walk across the stage. His daughter, Ingrid, and son, Charles Berry Jr., perform in the band and help out when Dad sometimes misses a lick. The adoring audience doesn’t mind, greeting those senior moments with shouts of “We love you Chuck!”

While music critics disagree on the first rock ‘n’ roll record, Berry gets unanimous credit for being the entertainer who took the music worldwide, starting with “Maybellene,” his first single released in 1955. Berry was the first inductee into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland, and recently received its American Music Masters Award at a tribute concert.

“He not only changed music, he helped change culture,” said Edwards, Berry’s long-time friend and part-time manager. “His music reached across the dividing line between blacks and whites. It also helped bring down the Iron Curtain. The Hungarian ambassador visited Blueberry Hill and said eastern and western Europeans listened to Chuck on their transistor radios. It did more to bring them together than any military threat.”

Scientist Carl Sagan paid homage to Berry in the late 1970s, when he chose the recorded sounds that would be aboard the Voyager space probes headed outside the solar system. “He included samplings of some of the best of what was on Earth,” Edwards said. “There were sounds of Brazilian jungles, some classical music and, for the 20th century, it was ‘Johnny B. Goode’ by Chuck Berry.”

Admission to the Berry concerts at Blueberry Hill is $35. Visit BlueberryHill.com for a schedule.

While a trip to Blueberry Hill to see Chuck Berry represents a pop-culture focused experience, there are plenty of sites in Missouri for more traditional exploration during Black History month (and year-round, for that matter). Here’s a quick sampling:

George Washington Carver National Monument, in Diamond: Tucked away in the southwest corner of the state, the national monument is at the site of the Moses Carver farm, where George Washington Carver was born to a slave girl in 1864. As an infant, he and his mother were kidnapped by Civil War guerillas. George was returned; his mother was never found.

The monument includes a state-of-the-art visitors center that tells the inspirational story of Carver’s arduous struggle to rise from his humble beginnings to become an artist, scientist, educator and humanitarian. His research showed that rotating crops of peanuts and soybeans with cotton could revive Southern soil. To encourage the practice, he developed more than 300 uses for peanuts.

The 240-acre site includes a short walk through woods near a spring-fed stream where young George discovered his love for botany. Later, George wrote of the experience: “Day after day, I spent in the woods alone in order to collect my floral beauties and put them in my little garden I had hidden in the brush not far from the house, as it was considered foolishness in that neighborhood to waste time on flowers.”

George Washington Carver National Monument is the first national monument to mark the birthplace of anyone other than a U.S. president, and the first to honor an African American. For details, visit www.nps.gov/gwca.

Battle of Island Mound State Historic Site, near Butler: Dedicated in October 2012, the plot of rolling prairie near the Kansas border is Missouri’s newest state historic site. It honors the African-American soldiers who fought a small but important Civil War battle.

The 240 soldiers, many of them escaped slaves, were members of the First Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry. In October 1862, they won a battle against a larger force of Confederate guerillas, marking the first time black troops were used in Civil War combat.

At the time, there was a national discussion about whether black soldiers would fight against whites. This skirmish, known as the Battle of Island Mound, answered that question, and made headlines as far away as New York City.

A white officer assigned to the unit wrote: “We have demonstrated that the Negro is anxious to serve his country, himself and race.”

The state historic site, south of Butler, has a circular gravel path that leads around some 40 acres of reclaimed prairie. Interpretative panels along the way explain what happened, and the significance of those events. Visit MoStateParks.com for more information.

The 18th and Vine Historic District, in Kansas City: A magical musical trip across Missouri could start at the Duck Room, in St. Louis, and end at the Blue Room, in Kansas City.

The 18th and Vine area was the center for black culture and life in Kansas City from the late 1800s to the 1960s. The Negro National League was founded near the district in 1920.

The Negro Leagues Baseball Museum opened in the early 1990s, and the complex was expanded in 1997 with the addition of the American Jazz Museum, which showcases the city’s musical heritage. The two first-class museums contain hundreds of photographs, artifacts and film exhibits that tell their stories.

The baseball museum profiles the league’s great players, including Satchel Paige, Buck O’Neil and Jackie Robinson, who played for the Kansas City Monarchs and was recruited in 1945 by the Brooklyn Dodgers to become the first African-American in the modern era to play in the major leagues.

The jazz museum describes the careers of such artists as Charlie Parker, Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington and Ella Fitzgerald. But the museum doesn’t stop at past greats. The Blue Room is an adjoining jazz club that showcases the best local and national jazz talent, in an intimate setting.

Visit AmericanJazzMuseum.com and NLBM.com for schedules and more information.

Scott Joplin House State Historic Site, in St. Louis: Like jazz, gospel, blues and rock, African Americans played a dominant role in creating yet another genre of music. Scott Joplin combined the structure of classical music with the free-flowing expression in jazz and gave the world the tinkling sounds of ragtime.

Born in Texas, Joplin took formal music classes in Sedalia, where he wrote “Maple Leaf Rag,” earning him the title of “King of Ragtime.”

He moved to St. Louis in the spring of 1900 to become a teacher and composer. His time in the city was his most productive and successful period. He wrote his first opera, “A Guest of Honor,” and “The Entertainer,” which was used as the theme song for the 1973 movie, “The Sting.” The classic piano rag is still played on ice-cream trucks throughout the area.

Joplin later moved to New York, where a string of personal disappointments took its toll. He died April 1, 1917. He was 49.

The second-story flat in a large brick house at 2658A Delmar Blvd., where Joplin lived in St. Louis, was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976. In 1984, the house and adjacent row buildings were acquired by the Department of Natural Resources and underwent an extensive restoration to become the first state historic site dedicated to an African American.

The second floor has been furnished with the décor and artifacts of Joplin’s era. Exhibits on the first floor interpret his life and work and include a music room where ragtime is played on a player piano. For more information, visit MoStateParks.com.

The Old Courthouse, in St. Louis: Now part of the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial that includes the Gateway Arch, the majestic Old Courthouse has a 150-year history, highlighted by the landmark Dred Scott case.

The courthouse was the site of the first two trials of the pivotal case in 1847 and 1850. Scott and his wife, Harriett, were slaves who sued for their freedom, arguing that they had lived in free territory with their owners.

The Scotts won in St. Louis, but their owner, Irene Harrison, appealed to the Missouri Supreme Court, which overturned the lower-court decision. The case was appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court, which agreed Scott and his family should remain in slavery. Although the Scotts later were freed, the decision hastened the divided country into the Civil War.

“The Legacy of Courage: Dred Scott & the Quest for Freedom” is a display in the courthouse on the first floor in the area where the original cases were heard. A bronze statute outside depicts Dred and Harriett Scott. Dred Scott’s grave is in Calvary Cemetery, in north St. Louis. For more information, visit nps.gov/jeff.

If you’re ready for a history-themed road trip, VisitMO has plotted your course, with the multi-day Trip Idea found here.

Tom Uhlenbrock is a staff writer for the Division of Tourism.

About the Missouri Division of Tourism
The Missouri Division of Tourism (MDT) is the official tourism office for the state of Missouri dedicated to marketing Missouri as a premier travel destination. Established in 1967, the Missouri Division of Tourism has worked hard to develop the tourism industry in Missouri to what it is today, an $11.2 billion industry supporting more than 279,000 jobs and generating $627 million in state taxes in Fiscal Year 2011. For every dollar spent on marketing Missouri as a travel destination in FY11, $57.76 was returned in visitor expenditures. For more information on Missouri tourism, go to http://www.visitmo.com/.


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Galena/Jo Daviess County CVB - Galena Wine Lovers' Weekend set for March 22-24, 2013 PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Travel & Tourism
Written by Celestino Ruffini   
Monday, 28 January 2013 16:34

GALENA, Ill. – Tickets are available online now for Galena’s extremely popular Grand Tastings during Galena Wine Lovers’ Weekend. This year’s event is slated for March 22-24, with Grand Tastings being offered on Friday, March 22 from 5:30 to 8:00 p.m. and Saturday, March 23 from 3:30 to 6:00 p.m. at the Galena Convention Center, 900 Galena Square Dr., in Galena, Illinois.

“This year’s Galena Wine Lovers’ Weekend promises to be even more fun-filled,” said event sponsor Tim Althaus, owner of Family Beer & Liquor. “We do highly recommend early purchase for Grand Tasting tickets as we have sold out quickly in past years.”

After selling out three weeks before the event in 2009, the committee expanded to offering two Grand Tastings in 2010, both of which have also sold out in the past two years. Tickets are $35 in advance and must be purchased online at www.wineloversweekend.com. There will be no at-the-door ticket sales this year.

Why are the Grand Tastings so popular? They provide epicureans of all levels the opportunity to choose from more than 300 varieties of hand-picked wines and spirits to sample. Admission also provides you with a keepsake wine glass and an opportunity to win a wine-themed trip to San Francisco (including round trip airfare for two through American Airlines in the continental 48 states). Additional trip chances may be purchased for $15 each. The wine silent auction includes items such as vintage wines, artwork, large format wine bottles and related items of interest.

Now in its eighth year running, Galena Wine Lovers’ Weekend is a community-wide celebration of good wine, good food and good friends. Wine lovers of all sorts are invited to enjoy three event-filled days of fine wine, culinary delight, celebrity chefs, wine makers, pampering packages and all of the stops Galena can possibly pull out.

Galena Wine Lovers’ Weekend is a spirited way to warm the winter and add romance—whether it is for vino, gourmet cuisine or the love for a town with history and charm all on its own. Wine-inspired dinners, spirit tastings, spa experiences, history tours, cooking demonstrations and shopping welcome and enchant visitors.

Lodging specials and package deals fuel the passion. From dining packages to pampering in luxurious accommodations and the warmest of hospitality, Galena’s finest provide a variety of options to cater to every taste and budget.

Visit www.wineloversweekend.com for a detailed listing of extended-weekend activities, links to lodging, and an opportunity to purchase tickets online. For information about room availability, shopping, dining, attractions, events and more, please go to galena.org, the Web site of the Galena/Jo Daviess County Convention & Visitors Bureau, or call toll-free 877.464.2536.

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U.S. Department of Transportation Gives Final Approval for Elgin O’Hare Western Access Project PDF Print E-mail
News Releases - Travel & Tourism
Written by Leslie Wertheimer   
Friday, 25 January 2013 15:42

‘Move Illinois’ Project will Reduce Traffic Congestion, Create 65,000 New Jobs by 2040 

CHICAGO – January 24, 2013. Governor Pat Quinn and the Illinois Tollway today announced that the U.S. Department of Transportation has approved the final agreement that will allow the Illinois Tollway to construct the Elgin O’Hare Western Access Project.  This sign off completes the last step in the federal review and approval process.

At the direction of Governor Quinn, the Illinois Tollway and Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) have been working with federal officials to secure the final authorization for the $3.4 billion project as part of the Illinois Tollway’s 15-year, $12 billion capital program, Move Illinois: The Illinois Tollway Driving the Future.  The project will boost long-term economic development in northeastern Illinois and provide congestion relief that is projected to save drivers $145 million a year in time and fuel costs.

“This critical step towards construction of the Elgin O’Hare Western Access Project is a testament to the strong support from Illinois to Washington D.C. to improve mobility throughout the region,” Governor Pat Quinn said. “I spoke with Secretary LaHood last night about the tremendous economic benefits that will result from this project, which will put thousands of Illinois men and women to work.”

The Elgin O'Hare Western Access Project has been in the works for decades and is considered a “Project of National and Regional Significance” by the U.S. Department of Transportation.

"I am pleased that we found a solution, so that when built, this project can provide mobility for the people of Illinois for generations to come,” said U.S Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood. “I look forward to continuing to work with Governor Quinn on this critical project."

“With this milestone, Illinois is well-positioned to implement this historic project, setting the stage for economic growth for decades to come,” said Illinois Tollway Executive Director Kristi Lafleur.

The Elgin O’Hare Western Access Project will include construction of a new, all-electronic toll road around the western border of O'Hare International Airport linking the Jane Addams Memorial Tollway (I-90) and the Tri-State Tollway (I-294), the extension of the Elgin O'Hare Expressway east along Thorndale Avenue to O'Hare and the rehabilitation and widening of the existing Elgin O'Hare Expressway.  The project is also expected to create as many as 65,000 direct and indirect jobs by 2040 when combined with completion of the western terminal at O’Hare Airport.

"The quick federal approval for this critically important project is a testament to the leadership of Governor Quinn and the close partnership of the Illinois Tollway and IDOT," said IDOT Secretary Ann Schneider. "It will create thousands of good jobs, strengthen the state's position as the transportation hub for the nation and lay the foundation for the continued long-term economic development of northeastern Illinois."

The Tollway is planning to spend $95.6 million in 2013 for work on the Elgin O’Hare Western Access Project.  Potential 2013 construction includes noise walls along the existing Elgin O’Hare Expressway, Rohlwing Road (Illinois Route 53) grade separation and the southbound Elmhurst Road over I-90 bridge. The actual location and schedule of construction will depend on land acquisition, permits, agreements and utility relocations.

The 2013-2025 implementation plan is broadly supported by local governments and represents a fiscally responsible approach to address the area's diverse travel needs - improving travel efficiency, providing western access to O'Hare, enhancing multi-modal connections and reducing congestion.

About Move Illinois

The Illinois Tollway’s $12 billion capital program, Move Illinois: The Illinois Tollway Driving the Future, will improve mobility, relieve congestion, reduce pollution, create as many as 120,000 jobs and link economies across the Midwest region. Move Illinois will address the remaining needs of the existing Tollway system; rebuild and widen the Jane Addams Memorial Tollway (I-90) as a state-of-the-art 21st century corridor; construct a new interchange to connect the Tri-State Tollway (I-294) to I-57; build a new, all-electronic Elgin O’Hare Western Access and fund planning studies for the Illinois Route 53/120 Extension and the Illiana Expressway.

About the Illinois Tollway

The Illinois Tollway is a user-fee system that receives no state or federal funds for maintenance and operations. The agency maintains and operates 286 miles of interstate tollways in 12 counties in Northern Illinois, including the Reagan Memorial Tollway (I-88), the Veterans Memorial Tollway (I-355), the Jane Addams Memorial Tollway (I-90) and the Tri-State Tollway (I-94/I-294/I-80).

 

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