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The Top 25 Censored Stories of 2008-9 PDF Print E-mail
Feature Stories
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 12 November 2009 06:32

Each year, Project Censored selects 25 "important national news stories that are underreported, ignored, misrepresented, or censored by the U.S. corporate media."

For the full summary for each of this year's selections, including the original sources and Web resources, visit ProjectCensored.org/top-stories/category/two-thousand-and-ten-book/.

1. U.S. Congress Sells Out to Wall Street

Federal lawmakers responsible for overseeing the U.S. economy have received millions of dollars from Wall Street firms. Since 2001, eight of the most troubled firms have donated $64.2 million to congressional candidates, presidential candidates, and the Republican and Democratic parties. As senators, Barack Obama and John McCain received a combined $3.1 million. The donors include investment bankers Bear Stearns, Goldman Sachs, Lehman Brothers, Merrill Lynch, and Morgan Stanley, insurer American International Group, and mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.

Some of the top recipients of contributions from companies receiving Troubled Assets Relief Program (TARP) money are the same members of Congress who chair committees charged with regulating the financial sector and overseeing the effectiveness of this unprecedented government program. In total, members of the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, & Urban Affairs, Senate Finance Committee, and House Financial Services Committee received $5.2 million from TARP recipients in the 2007-8 election cycle. President Obama collected at least $4.3 million from employees at these companies for his presidential campaign.

Nearly every member of the House Financial Services Committee, which in February 2009 oversaw hearings on how the $700 billion of TARP bailout was being spent, received contributions associated with these financial institutions during the 2008 election cycle. "You could say that the finance industry got their money's worth by supporting members of Congress who were inclined to look the other way," said Lawrence Jacobs, the director of the University of Minnesota's Center for the Study of Politics & Governance.

For instance, in 2004 when the Securities & Exchange Commission adopted a major rule change that freed investment banks to plunge tens of billions of dollars in borrowed money into subprime mortgages and other risky plays, congressional banking committees held no oversight hearings. Congressional inaction also allowed mortgage agents to earn high fees for peddling loans to unqualified homebuyers and prevented states from toughening regulations on predatory lending practices.

Author Matt Taibbi writes that some of the most egregious selling of the U.S. government to Wall Street happened in the late 1990s, when "Democrats, tired of getting slaughtered in the fundraising arena by Republicans, decided to throw off their old reliance on unions and interest groups and become more 'business-friendly.' Wall Street responded by flooding Washington with money, buying allies in both parties." In the 10-year period beginning in 1998, financial companies spent $1.7 billion on federal campaign contributions and another $3.4 billion on lobbyists. Wise political investments enabled the nation's top bankers to effectively scrap any meaningful oversight of the financial industry.

 
Palmer Picks New Chancellor PDF Print E-mail
City Shorts
Written by Joe Collins   
Tuesday, 10 November 2009 11:19

The Palmer College of Chiropractic Board of Trustees has announced the unanimous selection of Dennis Marchiori as chancellor of the school. His appointment will take effect December 15. Marchiori will succeed William Wilke, a Quad Cities-area businessman and a member of the Palmer board since 1998. In December 2008, following the departure of Chancellor Larry Patten, the board asked Wilke to serve until a thorough search could be conducted. An investiture ceremony is being planned for early next year.

 
Rock Island Begins Citizen Survey PDF Print E-mail
City Shorts
Written by Joe Collins   
Tuesday, 03 November 2009 06:02

A citizen survey will be conducted starting this week in Rock Island. Residents may receive a phone call from PMR Personal Marketing Research asking questions about the community. Every two years Renaissance Rock Island conducts citizen phone surveys to learn more about community perceptions of the city, along with how to attract and retain residents, businesses, and visitors. Eight hundred Quad Cities-area residents will be surveyed, creating a margin of error of 3.5 percent at a 95-percent level of confidence.

 
Quad Cities' Dining Guide, Fall/Winter 2009 PDF Print E-mail
Feature Stories
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 29 October 2009 12:13

Fall/Winter 2009 Dining Guide. Click to download.The fall/winter 2009 Quad Cities' Dining Guide is now available, featuring listings for more than 700 area restaurants.

You can get the Dining Guide three ways:

  • Pick it up in the October 29 issue of the River Cities' Reader.
  • Download a .pdf of it here.
  • Browse and search the listings online at RCReader.com/dining, at which listings are regularly updated.

 
A Night for Zombie Rights: ZWatch and the Zombie Pride Parade PDF Print E-mail
Feature Stories
Written by Jeff Ignatius   
Thursday, 29 October 2009 07:41

Zacharia Furio before ..."This is a big risk even talking to you," said Alexander Iaccarino. "I'm afraid of being prosecuted for this. 'Cause I'm not absolutely sure that any of this is legal."

It was October 16, more than three months after it all started and two weeks before its finale: the Zombie Pride Parade on Halloween night in downtown Davenport.

Looking back with that information, it's easy to see what Iaccarino was up to, and easy to laugh at it.

But when he told me that he was concerned about getting arrested, he sounded sincere and serious. And when he launched ZWatch.org on July 10, things were less cheeky. The Web site talked about a man named Zacharia Furio who was missing, and it alluded to a secretive organization called the QC Department of Biological Sciences.

Iaccarino and a small group of friends then produced videos, photos, and faked documents to tell the story of the H1Z1 virus and a local cover-up, slowly revealing a zombie narrative. The story was supported by some conspirators, such as local author Brian Krans (http://bit.ly/4erGco), and missing-persons posters. (Incidentally, the "H1Z1" idea was not original with Iaccarino; the name and concept of an H1N1-related zombie plague showed up several months before ZWatch: Google.com/search?q=h1z1, http://bit.ly/eiZhp.)

How convincing was it? On August 7, the Rock Island Argus/Moline Dispatch ran a front-page article titled "In Search of Zach: Is Story of Missing Man Just an Internet Hoax?" The story (http://bit.ly/1kq4nV) certainly suggested that ZWatch and Furio weren't real, but it also allowed for the possibility that they were authentic. There remained a seed of doubt, which is all it takes.

 
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