Suscribe to Weekly RiverCitiesReader.com Updates
* indicates required

View previous campaigns.

Best of the Quad Cities Fall 2009 Winners PDF Print E-mail
Feature Stories
Written by Administrator   
Wednesday, 30 September 2009 15:00

When we decided to break up our 2009 Best of the Quad Cities into two sections, the change had several benefits. For one, it allowed us to include more categories while making it easier for people to participate by cutting down on the number of categories on each ballot. And it allowed us to write articles about more winners.

This second half of balloting covers Arts, Culture, & Entertainment; Night Life; Shopping & Services; and People. (Food & Dining; Civics & Government; Media; and Recreation were covered in our April 1, 2009, issue. Those results can be found here.)

Over the course of two issues, our readers have voted on the best of the Quad Cities in roughly 120 categories, and we've written articles about almost 30 winners. In two rounds of voting, we had nearly 750 valid ballots. (This time, we required participants to provide reasonable responses in 20 categories.)

We also decided, with our summer balloting, to release the results online first, and readers have used the comments section over the past few weeks to debate the inclusion of certain categories (gay bar), the scope of certain categories (actor/actress), and the winners (band). That feedback is valuable in crafting future ballots, but we hope it also it encourages future participation. If you don't like some of the results this time around, make sure you and your friends vote the next time.

 
Deere Wins Preservation Award PDF Print E-mail
City Shorts
Written by Joe Collins   
Tuesday, 29 September 2009 08:00

On Saturday, October 3, the Deere & Company world headquarters in Moline will be one of nine historic sites honored by Landmarks Illinois as part of the 15th-annual Richard H. Driehaus Foundation Preservation Awards. Situated on 1,400 acres of land and spanning a man-made ravine, the Deere & Company headquarters was designed by architect Eero Saarinen and is an icon of the Modern movement. Completed in 1964, the original seven-story office complex was the first architectural design to use Cor-Ten steel as a primary building material. For more information on the awards, visit Landmarks.org/awards.htm.

 
A Textbook Case: Why Digital College Materials Haven’t Taken Off PDF Print E-mail
Feature Stories
Written by Megan Stephenson   
Wednesday, 23 September 2009 08:13

At the beginning the school year, in a chemistry class at St. Ambrose University, Professor Margaret Legg offered students the option to buy a less-expensive e-book instead of the usual physical textbook. No one opted for the digital version.

Kelsey Berg, a sophomore majoring in biology, said she had already bought the hardcover edition. Had the e-book been offered before she bought it, Berg said she still wouldn't have purchased it. "I don't like reading on a computer. It's hard to concentrate," she said, adding that it wasn't worth the cost, either, because one can't sell an e-book back.

Many college students are embracing digital and open-source textbooks, which are accessed through computers and digital readers such as Amazon's Kindle. For some, it provides a more convenient way to carry multiple textbooks. Beyond being easier on students' backs, e-books are also better for the environment, because no natural resources are used in the production or transportation of a physical book.

But the major selling point is a lower cost compared to new textbooks. Textbooks cost an average of $900 per semester, according to the federal Government Accountability Office. The U.S. Public Interest Research Group (PIRG) has been advocating for reducing the prices of textbooks, which they say have risen faster than the rate of inflation in the past several years.

Although e-books are often 50 percent less expensive than unused print editions of textbooks, the cost evaluation isn't quite so clear-cut. In many cases, there's little or no cost savings to students in the long run.

And some people, like Berg, resist e-books for other reasons.

 
Rock Island Identifies 100 Most Significant Unprotected Structures PDF Print E-mail
City Shorts
Written by Joe Collins   
Tuesday, 22 September 2009 07:43

The Rock Island Preservation Commission has spent the past nine months surveying post-World War II subdivisions, researching the homes of some of Rock Island's most prominent historical citizens and comparing the architectural merit of hundreds of buildings, all for the purpose of identifying Rock Island's "100 most significant unprotected structures." These 100 structures represent the best of Rock Island's historic buildings that aren't already designated a Rock Island landmark or located in the Highland Park Historic District. The complete list is organized by address and by name and can be downloaded at RIGov.org/pdf/headlines/2009/091709MoSUS.pdf.

 
The Blue Cat’s “Blue Bastard” on 15 Years in the Beer Business PDF Print E-mail
Feature Stories
Written by Jeff Ignatius   
Wednesday, 16 September 2009 12:19

Brewmaster/Blue Bastard Dan Cleaveland

The Blue Cat Brew Pub opened 15 years ago this year, and given its institutional status in the Quad Cities, it's hard to believe that starting out, its proprietors knew next to nothing about how to brew beer or run a brewpub.

As co-owner and brewmaster Dan Cleaveland tells it, his sister Martha wanted to open a bar/restaurant, and after she learned about the brewpub model, she saw a business opportunity: There were no brewpubs in the Quad Cities.

Dan had never brewed beer. "She thought I'd make a good brewer," he said last week. Why? "I was a scientist, I guess."

 
<< Start < Prev 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Next > End >>

Page 15 of 149