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items tagged with dramas

Mime on Wire: "The Walk," "Tiny Giants 3D," and "Hell & Back"
Written By: Mike Schulz
Section: Movies

Category: Reviews

2015-10-03 21:55:47

Joseph Gordon-Levitt in The WalkTHE WALK

There have been verified reports of patrons vomiting during the last half hour of The Walk, director Robert Zemeckis’ big-budget take on Philippe Petit’s famed 1974 high-wire trek between Manhattan’s Twin Towers, a tale previously recounted in James Marsh’s Oscar-winning documentary Man on Wire. The response of those patrons is understandable; as a lifelong sufferer of vertigo – especially when those vertiginous heights are around 1,368 feet above street level – I did have to look at the cineplex floor a few times to steady my nerves. But in the end, my senses of profound terror, anxiety, and euphoria at Zemeckis’ cinematic feat proved worth the discomfort. I only wish I could say the same for the movie’s first 90 minutes, which could easily provoke vomiting among those, like myself, who gag at the mere thought of revisiting Amélie.
Read More About Mime On Wire: "The Walk," "Tiny Giants 3D," And "Hell & Back"...


Social Climbers: "Everest," "Captive," and "Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials"
Written By: Mike Schulz
Section: Movies

Category: Reviews

2015-09-20 01:33:21

Jason Clarke in EverestEVEREST

At present, the only way to see director Baltasar Kormákur’s adventure drama Everest – the only legal way, at any rate – is in its IMAX 3D presentation, as the film won’t be released in other, less surcharge-filled formats until September 25. Yet even if, like me, you consider yourself a generally frugal (i.e., cheapskate) cineplex patron, I implore you to suck it up, shell out the extra dough, and treat yourself to the biggest, loudest Everest available. I’m not sure how well this thing will play on smaller screens, but the IMAX 3D version is a staggering, even humbling experience for the eyes and ears – a mountain that, on your TV or computer or iPhone, might more accurately suggest a molehill.
Read More About Social Climbers: "Everest," "Captive," And "Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials"...


Stalking, Shocking, Screeching, Preaching: "The Perfect Guy," "The Visit," "Un Gallo con Muchos Huevos," and "90 Minutes in Heaven"
Written By: Mike Schulz
Section: Movies

Category: Reviews

2015-09-14 00:51:55

Michael Ealy in The Perfect GuyFriday, September 11, 10:25 a.m.-ish: This millennium has already delivered 18 screen hours of J.R.R. Tolkien, our first female Oscar winner for Best Director, and, astoundingly, two Fantastic Four reboots. Why, given such miracles, can’t we be treated to even one stalker thriller that doesn’t suck?
Read More About Stalking, Shocking, Screeching, Preaching: "The Perfect Guy," "The Visit," "Un Gallo Con Muchos Huevos," And "90 Minutes In Heaven"...


The Wails of August: "War Room," "We Are Your Friends," "The Diary of a Teenage Girl," and "No Escape"
Written By: Mike Schulz
Section: Movies

Category: Reviews

2015-08-30 17:01:33

Karen Abercrombie and Priscilla C. Shirer in War RoomFriday, August 28, 10 a.m.-ish: The day begins with the pro-faith drama War Room, in which a harried working mom is guided – or more accurately bullied – into surrendering to God’s will and forgiving her husband for his inattentive, verbally abusive, potentially adulterous ways. It’s kind of exactly the movie you expect. It’s also one of the most revolutionary movies of its type yet produced, because even a few years ago, it would’ve been unimaginable for a film skewing to America’s religious right to feature an African-American family at its core.
Read More About The Wails Of August: "War Room," "We Are Your Friends," "The Diary Of A Teenage Girl," And "No Escape"...


A Supposedly Fun Thing He’ll Never Do Again: "The End of the Tour," "Tangerine," and "The Tribe"
Written By: Mike Schulz
Section: Movies

Category: Reviews

2015-08-24 01:03:04

Jesse Eisenberg and Jason Segel in The End of the TourTHE END OF THE TOUR

An interviewer for Rolling Stone travels to Bloomington, Illinois, to meet his subject: an author embarking on the last leg of his book tour. They make small talk at the author’s house. They smoke incessantly. They gorge on junk food. They travel to Minnesota for a reading and radio segment. They visit the Mall of America. They catch a multiplex movie. They hang out with a couple of young women. They consume more junk food. They return to Bloomington. They part ways.

In broad outline, that is the entire plot of director James Ponsoldt’s and screenwriter Donald Margulies’ The End of the Tour. And with the possible exception of Mad Max: Fury Road, no other 2015 release, to date, has entertained, thrilled, and devastated me quite as much as this one. (The film is currently playing at Iowa City’s Marcus Sycamore Cinema.) I’ll concede that much of the reason for my enjoyment might be strictly personal, or at least intensely specific. But I also don’t think anyone needs to have been an interviewer, or an interviewee, to be dazzled by the film’s intelligence, emotional complexity, and deep empathy, or by the insight it demonstrates regarding the oddly fraught practice of the celebrity profile. You probably also don’t need to be an admirer of David Foster Wallace to find yourself frequently moved to tears, but if you are one, consider yourself warned.
Read More About A Supposedly Fun Thing He’Ll Never Do Again: "The End Of The Tour," "Tangerine," And "The Tribe"...





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