High-energy blues often come off as a touch disingenuous; if one’s truly stuck in the blues, one’s more likely to be in a torpor than firing off lightning-quick licks.
The Quad Cities’ own Whatever Blues Band seems to understand this.

The Money Pit

Part one of two

On August 13, Greg Hoover, the director of housing and neighborhood development for the City of Davenport, presented a powerful report to the city council painting a disturbing picture of how people with poor credit are being exploited.

When she began dancing with CMBT two years ago, Erica Christensen found that the company was not well-known in the Quad Cities. "No one even knew there was a ballet company around," she said.

At the time, CMBT: Quad Cities Professional Ballet Company had four dancers.

Prints from the Great Day in the Quad Cities portrait taken at this month's ArtStroll are now available. The photo, the second in a planned cycle of four documenting different facets of the arts, is a snapshot of the area's music community.

In their third year, the Celtic Highland Games of the Quad Cities
have reached a certain stature. The one-day festival and competition, which will be held Saturday at the Mississippi Valley Fairgrounds, has attracted top-flight performers rare for an event so young.

Say the word "scooter" to most people, admits Dean Wright, and "they picture you on a Honda moped."

But that's not quite what Wright and his friends are into, and when they're on the road, they draw attention.

What Now?

Last week's announcement that the Vision Iowa board will contribute $20
million to Davenport's $113 million riverfront-revitalization project was, with good reason, greeted with smiles all around the Quad Cities.

With big beats, a care-free, soulful groove, and a big-ass smile on every song, Minneapolis’ Iffy couldn’t be more different than its name when it comes to its status as a party band. What is uncertain is whether the trio will get credit for being supreme craftsmen and smart songwriters.

When Mike and Amy Finders began playing music together four years ago, they were playing folk rock in the bars around Dubuque and Galena, where they lived.

But they decided to change direction. "Let's not just try to be loud and entertaining to people who aren't exactly paying attention," Finder said of the thought process behind the decision.

• This Thursday will feature a couple of homecomings at some local taverns. The Ernie Peniston Band reunites for an August 9 show at O'Meara's Pub in Bettendorf. Bo Butler, Joe Collins, and Tony Carton will join Peniston (front man for the Chicago Rhythm & Blues Kings) to perform blues tunes from his Quad Cities days.

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