Taking place during Truth in Action's “24 Hours of Reality” program – a daylong global conversation on the climate crisis and how we might solve it – the 2018 documentary Paris to Pittsburgh will enjoy a screening and subsequent panel discussion at Davenport's Figge Art Museum on November 21, an event held as a companion program to the venue's current art exhibition Mia Feuer: Totems of Anthropocene.

In my apparently endless need to publicly prove I have no life, I caught eight films at four different venues between Thursday and Saturday. Some titles are worth more words than I've given them; a couple are undoubtedly worth less. Regardless, the following are listed in order of preference. If you're among those readers who enjoy my pans more than my praise, by all means work your way backward.

0-9 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z | Special Features

0-9 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z | Special Features

You can nearly always pinpoint the precise moment in which a formerly serious – or at least mildly rational – film franchise turns inexorably into camp.

Two new works celebrating American courage, character, and perseverance will debut at the Putnam Museum & Science Center, fittingly enough, on Veteran's Day weekend, with the Davenport venue hosting the premieres of Fourth Wall Films' A Bridge Too Far from Hero Street and Riding the Rails to Hero Street – the latest documentaries in the Hero Street series by area filmmakers Kelly and Tammy Rundle.

Even if the movie itself was only half as good as it is, the bio-comedy Dolemite Is My Name would be worth a watch – several watches, actually – just for the pleasure of seeing Eddie Murphy happier on-screen than he's seemed in ages.

At my recent screening of The Addams Family, the film was preceded by a trailer for Disney's fairytale sequel Maleficent: Mistress of Evil, and after the preview ended, a little girl in the row ahead of me turned to her mother (I presume) and asked, “Why is Maleficent a bad guy now?”

If you're a fan of globe-trotting action thrillers, and a fan of Will Smith, what could be more fun than Gemini Man, director Ang Lee's stunt-heavy entertainment that gives you two Smiths for the price of one? Just about anything, it turns out, because Lee's latest is a crushing bore: heavy-spirited when it needs to be light – which is pretty much all the time – and so serious about its objectively ridiculous plot that we're given little choice but to laugh at it. Speaking on behalf of my fellow Gemini males, we deserve better representation than this.

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