Nominated for five 2001 Tony Awards and currently the ninth-longest-running Broadway musical of all time, the internationally beloved Mamma Mia! enjoys a Countryside Community Theatre and Lancer Productions staging at Eldridge's North Scott High School July 19 through 28, the show's collection of timeless tunes from the Swedish pop group ABBA leading the New York Post to call the experience “one of those nights when you sit back and let a nutty kind of joy just sweep over you.”

Described by the New York Times as “an astonishingly durable interactive murder mystery” with an “inclusive spirit of fun,” the slapstick comedy Shear Madness makes its eagerly awaited return to Rock Island's Circa '21 Dinner Playhouse July 24 through September 7, the theatre's 2016 presentation of the show inspiring the River Cities' Reader's Jeff Ashcraft to deem it “uproarious, farcical, and fabulous,” as well as “one wild and colorful ride.”

Artists from the Quad City region are, through September 2, transforming the Quad City Arts International Airport Gallery with works incorporating neon and video, along with other lighting effects, in the exhibition Electrified – a fascinating showcase boasting vintage automobile signs on loan from K.V. Dahl of Dahl Ford, as well as an interactive exhibit requiring viewers to climb onto a vintage bicycle and pedal in order to illuminate a display courtesy of Bill Wohlford and Ron Kessel.

Local and national writing talents will combine their literary gifts for one special night at Rock Island's Rozz-Tox on July 18, with the evening's SPECTRA readings – co-presented by the Midwest Writing Center – treating attendees to spoken-word performances by emerging area authors as well as critically acclaimed poets Adam Fell, MC Hyland, Christine Kanownik, and Becca Klaver.

Lauded by Paste magazine for their “emotional urgency” and by the Chicago Tribune for “the sheer force of the trio's aching, tight-knit harmonies,” the Americana and alt-country musicians of The Lone Bellow perform a July 18 Moeller Nights concert at Maquoketa's Codfish Hollow Barn, demonstrating why NPR raved about “the group's earnest, ingratiating charm, dispensed via charisma-drenched songs that amble and soar.”

Performing from a repertoire that includes such classics as “Uncle John's Band,” “Truckin,” “Alabama Getaway,” and the chart-topping “Touch of Grey,” the rockers of The Schwag return to the Rock Island Brewing Company on July 19, appearing locally in their 28th year as professional Grateful Dead tribute artists.

An early pioneer of the 1960s' British Invasion and a bona-fide rock-and-roll legend plays Davenport's Redstone Room on July 20, with the venue hosting the area arrival of singer/songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Denny Laine, the 74-year-old Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee who co-founded The Moody Blues and the Paul McCartney-led outfit Wings.

On July 21, a quartet of gifted musicians serve as the latest guests in Polyrhythms' Third Sunday Jazz Workshop and Matinée Series, with Davenport's Redstone Room hosting an evening of jazz originals and standards with the 3 Dawgs & a Bone ensemble of Scott Barnum on bass, Jim Dreier on drums, Steve Grismore on guitar, and Rich Medd on bone – trombone, that is.

Described by Broadway World as “bursting with show-stopping number after show-stopping number” and by the New York Theatre Guide as “a tap-dancing extravaganza of pure delight,” the exhilarating show-biz salute 42nd Street enjoys a Quad City Music Guild staging at Moline's Prospect Park Auditorium, its July 12 through 21 run demonstrating why this modern stage classic, in its 1980s debut, ran 3,486 Broadway performances and earned Tony Awards for Best Musical and Best Choreography.

With Talkin' Broadway calling it “a lighthearted look at the struggle between art and commerce” as well as “a play that you can't help but love,” the Hollywood period comedy Something Intangible serves as the latest production at Moline's Playcrafters Barn Theatre, with the show's July 12 through 21 run sure to prove why the Philadelphia City Paper deemed it an “:insightful exploration of artists and the people who love – and suffer – them.”

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