The public has an opportunity to submit its individual and collective thoughts about its expectations for a new police and fire chief via this survey and two public meetings scheduled for this week. The survey is equally important because it gives direction to the City as to who, what, why and how to measure the various applicants for these two critically important positions.

Zoning In

Since early May 2000, I have participated as a member of the Mayor's Ad Hoc Committee for 53rd Street in Davenport. The purpose of the committee is to ascertain what to do with 218 acres the City prematurely purchased last year within the 53rd Street/Eastern Avenue Mixed-Use Development project area prior to the project's demise.
Maybe there is something in the water at Davenport's City Hall. The new council, men and a woman who were elected on platforms of doing the people's business, resemble their predecessors more closely than ever.
There is no question that there exists much discontent in the air relative to Davenport's new city council. And confidence in city government appears to be at an all time low. But how can this be after electing seven new aldermen, practically the entire council, who appeared committed to bringing a new way of doing business to Davenport? What happened to this inspired bunch who promised to carry the people's baton? The first six months of any new job has a learning curve to be absorbed, no matter how experienced the applicant(s).
Last week, the 7th District Judicial Court upheld Davenport's Zoning Board of Adjustments' (ZBA) rulings (November/December 1999) that declared five of Revolutions' billboard placements out of compliance with Davenport's zoning ordinances.

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