Two artists presently showing at Quad City Arts take familiar media and put their distinctive stamps on them. Lisa L. Mahar's Putting the "Fun" Back into Functional showcases 30 furniture sculptures, while Sara Toton's Found Objects features 36 photographic collages.

The Bi-State Biennial Art Exhibition now on display at the Davenport Museum of Art has grown significantly since its 1999 incarnation, with 73 artists compared to 52 two years ago. The artists come from nearly 40 communities throughout Iowa and Illinois, and the states are evenly represented, with 41 works from Iowa and 39 from Illinois.

Although Colleen Curry is working in a more novel medium than Jacki Olson and Dick Oberg, it is Curry whose art makes its impact beyond the materials in the Quad City ArtsCenter's current show.

Curry is a three-dimensional artist working in quilted fabrics with armature frames to provide the structure for her freestanding pieces, while Olson and Oberg are graphic artists working together with photographs and the computer program Photoshop.

The Japanese block prints in the Davenport Museum of Art's wonderful current exhibit took me back to the late '60s and early '70s, when I almost got kicked out of art school for suggesting that comic books were art.

Tom Newport's sculptures are a great counterpoint to Steven Anderson's paintings; the sculptures are completely abstract, while the paintings range from photo-realistic renderings of automobiles to Grant Wood-ish landscapes.

More than $2,000 in awards will be presented on Friday, April 6, at the opening reception of the 25th Annual Rock Island Fine Arts Exhibition, which will be on display in the Augustana College Art Gallery through April 29.

Two wildly different shows are currently on display at the Augustana College Art Gallery in Rock Island: From a Borderless World: Works of Enrique Chagoya (through March 28) and John Beckelman: Recent Works in Clay (through March 20).

For a show in spring 1998, the artist statement of Cyndy Gilroy was heavy and serious. The statement is a bit more upbeat for her current show with Jeanne Tamisiea at the MidCoast Fine Arts Gallery, a reflection of the brightness of the work.

If you go to the Davenport Museum of Art's current exhibition of Haitian art from its permanent collection - and you should - be sure to read the notes posted by the works. They offer background on the culture of Haiti that adds to the enjoyment of the show, which features more than 70 works from the museum's collection.

Artists Bill Hannan and Bill Wohlford have more than their first names in common. Both deal realistically with the human figure - Hannan in two dimensions and Wohlford in three. Both artists have worked other jobs to provide income, while doing their artwork when they could.

Pages