The City of Davenport doesn't own the land on which it would like to build a new west-end library, and the owner of the farmstead - an elderly couple - has said it is unwilling to sell.
But city leaders haven't given up on the property yet and are still considering condemning a portion of it.

There might be nothing more difficult in rock music than crafting a good pop song. Except to make a couple albums full of them.
Pop songs are so tricky because they need to sound effortless and ebullient while being catchy and tight – and that requires hard work, which makes effortless and ebullient all that more difficult.

I ask Carter Brown where he wants to take his Lazer Vaudeville troupe.
"Australia," he says.
I clarify the question: artistically. He thinks for a moment and says that he and his two collaborators have been working on a piece that is as much about percussion as it is juggling, "actually creating music" with the objects being juggled and a sound processor.

You remember rock, don’t you? That arena sound that required no hair spray, no leather, no preening, no showy solos, no attitude? The only things you needed were guitar, drums, bass, and a singer.
That’s exactly what the local band Blue Ash Ink has on its self-titled, self-released album.

Last week's Davenport City Council approval of an agreement with the Isle of Capri Casino sets the stage for a new riverboat casino opening next year - and possibly more money for community projects.
"We're just happy we can move forward," said Mary Ellen Chamberlin, president of the Riverboat Development Authority (RDA).

It was meant to be a bonus for consumers - faster Internet connections at the same price - but some people got significantly less than they were promised, and a few local Internet providers aren't happy about it, either.

Is Crime Back?

The refrain has gotten pretty old, to the point that most people react with indifference. Crime is down. Crime falls even more. Crime drops again.
That's true nationwide, in Illinois and Iowa, and in the Quad Cities.

The Davenport City Council last week tentatively approved a $3.7 million incentive package for Sentry Insurance to relocate from Moline, claiming that without the deal the company might have left the Quad Cities altogether.

Progressive rock has never been cool. It has sometimes been respected, but those periods have been fleeting and hastily apologized for.
The genre had many practitioners in the early 1970s, bands unafraid of releasing 30-minute pieces (they can’t properly be called songs) rife with self-indulgence and pomposity.

Four community meetings last week revealed a strong public sentiment: The City of Davenport should sell the property it owns at 53rd and Eastern but ensure that the new owners develop the land responsibly and create green space.

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