Bribery is a Class 2 felony in Illinois. It's also a federal offense, punishable by up to ten years in prison. Neither of those laws stopped former State Representative Luis Arroyo (D-Chicago) from allegedly attempting to bribe a state Senator, who turned out to be an FBI mole.

The first day of the 2019 veto session on Monday, October 28, was unlike any other that most people have ever seen.

Governor JB Pritzker has lately won plaudits from some conservative opinion-makers for making the right moves on corruption. But I am going to register an objection in a bit.

The political muscle of ComEd/Exelon aced its last major test in 2016, when the energy companies finally passed what one Illinois House member referred to at the time as a "multi-billion-dollar corporate-bailout" by electricity rate-payers to keep two of its nuclear power-plants open.

One of the provisions of the sweeping state pension-reform law passed in 2010 has always stuck in the craw of first-responders.

Police and (especially) firefighter unions fought the local government lobby for decades to increase survivor benefits, and then they watched many of those hard-fought wins get wiped away when the General Assembly decided it had to lower pension benefits for new hires to avoid a fiscal catastrophe.

The Illinois Senate recently released a heavily-redacted copy of the federal search-warrant served during the raid of State Senator Martin Sandoval's Statehouse office last month. And the Village of McCook also released a heavily-redacted search-warrant from the federal raid of its town hall.

At about the same time last week, Chicago-based investigators with the FBI and the IRS swooped into Democratic State Senator Marty Sandoval's district office, Statehouse office, and home residence, removing boxes of documents and seizing computers.

Whatever else you may believe, you have to commend Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot for trying to live up to her campaign promise of making sure that new economic development isn't concentrated in her city's downtown business district.

The governor's top budget people sent a memo last week to agency directors giving them a heads-up about what will be required in their annual budget-request submissions. They are not easy-peasy asks.

Representative David McSweeney (R-Barrington Hills) announced last week that he will not seek reelection. Instead, he said he'll likely be making a 2022 statewide bid for either US Senate against Senator Tammy Duckworth or Secretary of State if Jesse White retires.

He may not be a household name, but Representative McSweeney has been a huge thorn in Republican leadership's side since he first ran for the Illinois House in the 2012 primary.

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