Best of ... ?

I
understand that money talks. I understand voters need to be heard.
(See "Best of the Quad Cities," River
Cities' Reader
Issue 671,
February 13-19, 2008.)

I
feel I must speak up. The Quad Cities area is blessed with a few
individuals who take it upon themselves to bring talent from all over
the world to our small neck of the woods, yet remain unmentioned. The
folks at Daytrotter have provided us with hundreds of songs recorded
in Rock Island (not to mention live shows).

The
people at Mixtapes in East Moline try to bring in weekly acts from
around the world. I've watched the Redstone Room degrade its self
over the time it's been open. Money is their concern, not music.
The Quad Cities is full of original talent and wonderful people
trying to bring more to our area, regardless of monetary gain. I feel
I am not alone in these opinions.

 

Marc
Hans Showalter

 

A
Republic, Not a Democracy

It
is tragic that so many citizens believe that we live in a democracy
instead of the republic that our founders established. The word
"democracy" does not appear in the Declaration of Independence,
the U.S. Constitution, or any of our state constitutions. It does
appear in The Federalist Papers,
where the founders wrote about their fear of it. We pledge allegiance
to our flag and to the "republic" for which it stands. A republic
is rule by law. A democracy is rule by majority, which can lead to
mob rule.

Our
republic is organized to protect our natural or God-given rights. To
protect these rights, we have a U.S. Constitution that both citizens
and government officials are required to obey. Futhermore, our U.S.
Constitution states: "The United States shall guarantee to every
state in this union, a republican form of government." Any other
system - democracy, dictatorship, monarchy, or oligarchy - is
organized to restrict individual rights to the degree determined by
the whims of those in charge. Go to (http://www.thenewamerican.com)
for details. Search for "rights."

Unfortunately,
we citizens have allowed federal officials to violate their oath of
office so that about 80 percent of federal legislation today is
unconstitutional, and it has restricted our rights. Unless enough
citizens wake up and demand that federal officials obey our
Constitution, we soon will be living in one of the other four
systems.

 

Kathie
Diane Shaffer

Sylmar,
California

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