I am constantly frustrated at the lack of due diligence when it comes to the Davenport city council's proceedings protocol. As I understand it, the council is given green sheets that are brief overviews, item by item, of the coming week's city business.

The Economic Development Department of the City of Davenport held a workshop on Economic Development Tools and TIF on December 9, 2000, at City Hall. City leaders, aldermen and local activists attended to learn, discuss and debate the merits of TIF and development principles in general.

When DavenportOne was formed, in part, out of the consolidation of the several separate but similar downtown groups earlier this year, I was skeptical of how decisions were going to be made on future spending, vision, and the organization of our city's core.

One of the interesting things about alternative weekly papers is that, no matter how old they get, they still carry the spirits, interests, and concerns of their founders.
The River Cities' Reader celebrates its 300th issue this week, and although I've only been around for 20 or so issues, it's evident that the paper is an accurate reflection of Publisher Todd McGreevy and Editor Kathleen McCarthy, who started it more than seven years ago.

300 issues is an accomplishment to crow about, especially in the media-heavy Quad Cities. We wish to convey our deep gratitude to our loyal readers and advertisers for the past eight years of unwavering support.

Dick Cheney Censors the Media During Battle
I recently read a most interesting article in the American Journalism Review ("Collective Amnesia" by Jaqueline Sharkey; October 2000) about then-Defense Secretary Dick Cheney's censorship policy during the Panama invasion and the Persian Gulf War.

No matter how you cut the cards, the presidential election was a statistical dead heat nationwide. So the ballot problems in Florida are but a microcosm of what has occurred in many other states.
The real question becomes what can Americans expect from either candidate once he takes office.

You would think the minute the Davenport City Council heard the word TIF (tax increment financing), their little ears would perk up and their brains would start quaking. When the recent news of the proposed TIF to subsidize Sentry Insurance's move to Davenport came to their attention, the City Council should have been on it like ducks on June bugs.

Last week the Davenport City Council voted 7-3 in favor of an additional $3.5 million in funding for the proposed relocation of the Davenport Museum of Art into downtown. This brings the city's contribution to $6.

For nearly four months, a mayor's ad hoc committee made up of several members of the Davenport community (including myself), along with various aldermen and city staff, has struggled with what to do with 220 acres the City owns as part of the failed 53rd Street Mixed-Use Development project.

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